My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,065 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have a lug nut freeze up while switching wheels on your tractor wheel that was on so tight you strip the head and couldn't turn it out?

I remember I did some years back and I called a friend that use to service small lawn mowers etc.

We used a mm size deep socket and hampered it over the lug nut head to work it loose.

I'll always remember what he told me that day that those lugs have tapered heads and don't need to be tighten that much.
 

·
Tractor nut, general nut
Joined
·
461 Posts
I take them off with an air impact wrench, but going back on is just with a ratchet so they don't get over-tightened. Then I check/retighten them after about 10 hours of use.

And don't forget... always use Never-sieze!!
:thThumbsU
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
If you've rounded the head really badly, a trip to the tool section at Sears may be in order. They carry special sockets, I keep a set in what I call my "Oh ****" drawer in the tool box. As you turn them to remove a bolt teeth dig in to the rounded head. They don't strip easily.

I remember stripping lug nuts on a 1970 Chrysler Newport once. Had absolutely no idea that one side of the car had left hand threads and the other side had right hand threads... LOL live and learn.
 

·
Run ahead of the pack
Joined
·
9,968 Posts
I take them off with an air impact wrench, but going back on is just with a ratchet so they don't get over-tightened. Then I check/retighten them after about 10 hours of use.

And don't forget... always use Never-sieze!!
:thThumbsU
Just be careful to not overtightened them, you not suppose to put any lubricant on wheel stud.

The problem with anti-seize compound is that it lubricates the threads, which can result in a very much higher tension in the bolt than the torque used to tighten it would provide with clean, dry threads.
I understand the desire to use anti-seize compound, make sure to have clean, dry, rust-free threads before putting a lug nut on and after if you want put some anti-seize to prevent the stud to rust.
 

·
Murray tractor owner
Joined
·
2,672 Posts
I take my lugs of with my air impact wrench and put back on with the air impact wrench with a torque stick so it isn't too tight.
 

·
Enginerd - DieselDork
Joined
·
784 Posts
Anyone have a lug nut freeze up while switching wheels on your tractor wheel that was on so tight you strip the head and couldn't turn it out?

I remember I did some years back and I called a friend that use to service small lawn mowers etc.

We used a mm size deep socket and hampered it over the lug nut head to work it loose.

I'll always remember what he told me that day that those lugs have tapered heads and don't need to be tighten that much.
"Stubborn Lug Nut" ... at first I thought this post might be an autobiography! :trink39:

There are lots of ways to undo a stubborn nut/bolt, depending on what you've got around.

1. Vice-grips, a hammer, and some penetrating oil.

2. One of those special sockets with reverse threads inside that will "grab" the head of the bolt/nut and help you get it off.

3. A dremel and chisel. (cut through one side of the nut and then chisel it off the stud.)

4. "heat wrench" (a torch to expand the nut)

5. A trebuchet. This will fling the offending piece of equipment out of your sight. Out of sight, out of mind.
 

·
Make Better Mowers
Joined
·
2,075 Posts
In my book, PB Blaster is the very best penetrating juice on the market! I gave up on WD-40 years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Derek, I also had a 1970 Chrysler product. A 1970 Dodge Sweptline Pickup with the slant six. Yep, the left side had left hand threads. I took off the drums and knocked out the lugs, and replaced them with right hand threads..

But I do the same, Remove lug nuts with an air gun, and tighten with a 4-way..
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top