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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I've got a 1998 Murray Garden Tractor. Here's a shot of the rear:
http://s461.photobucket.com/albums/qq334/jbeall/Tractors/?action=view&current=IMG_7147.jpg

I've already had some issue with the clevis hitch bending, it's just a sheet of steel with a hole in it. I'd like to strengthen that hitch up a little bit.

I'll be honest, I have no idea what I'm talking about :) But it seems like I should be able to weld on another metal plate there to give it some added strength and keep it from deforming. What's been happening is that when the tractor is pulling something that's really resisting (e.g., a grader that's in tough material), the hitch pulls back and is bending the clevis hitch down towards the ground. You can imagine an exaggerated version of what's happening by picturing how it would deform if you took a long piece of rebar, stuck it through the clevis hitch, and then pulled backwards on the top of the rebar.

So, what are some ways I could strengthen my hitch to correct this?

I don't know a thing about welding. It's something I'd like to learn about, if I can find the equipment to start in on it. I don't have the electrical service for one of those 100+ amp MIG/TIG welders. So I guess if I'm going to weld something on myself, I'd have to go oxy-acetylene--right?

Am I crazy to try and get into the welding thing, should I just leave this to professionals?

-Josh
 

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Hi All,

I've got a 1998 Murray Garden Tractor. Here's a shot of the rear:
http://s461.photobucket.com/albums/qq334/jbeall/Tractors/?action=view&current=IMG_7147.jpg

I've already had some issue with the clevis hitch bending, it's just a sheet of steel with a hole in it. I'd like to strengthen that hitch up a little bit.

I'll be honest, I have no idea what I'm talking about :) But it seems like I should be able to weld on another metal plate there to give it some added strength and keep it from deforming. What's been happening is that when the tractor is pulling something that's really resisting (e.g., a grader that's in tough material), the hitch pulls back and is bending the clevis hitch down towards the ground. You can imagine an exaggerated version of what's happening by picturing how it would deform if you took a long piece of rebar, stuck it through the clevis hitch, and then pulled backwards on the top of the rebar.

So, what are some ways I could strengthen my hitch to correct this?

I don't know a thing about welding. It's something I'd like to learn about, if I can find the equipment to start in on it. I don't have the electrical service for one of those 100+ amp MIG/TIG welders. So I guess if I'm going to weld something on myself, I'd have to go oxy-acetylene--right?

Am I crazy to try and get into the welding thing, should I just leave this to professionals?

-Josh


you can buy a arc welder or a wire feed welder that runes on 120 volt ..I think my old arc is 70 amp its just a basic arc welder it works mint ...As for your hitch there is a lot of ways you can do this ..I made a plate for my old sears it went over the stock hitch i welded it worked fine ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
you can buy a arc welder or a wire feed welder that runes on 120 volt ..I think my old arc is 70 amp its just a basic arc welder it works mint ...As for your hitch there is a lot of ways you can do this ..I made a plate for my old sears it went over the stock hitch i welded it worked fine ...
I don't have any circuits in my outbuildings over 30 amps, and I've only got 100 amps of service to all the barns. I guess I could put in a 70 amp circuit so long as I made sure nothing else was in use when I was welding, right? :)

It arc welding preferable to oxy-acetylene welding?
 

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I don't have any circuits in my outbuildings over 30 amps, and I've only got 100 amps of service to all the barns. I guess I could put in a 70 amp circuit so long as I made sure nothing else was in use when I was welding, right? :)

It arc welding preferable to oxy-acetylene welding?
70 Amps would be the output. I'm sure it wouldn't draw 30 Amps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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Welding is addictive and having the ability to fabricate the parts you want and need is very satisfying. I used a weld-pak 100 hd with flux core wire and it runs off a 20 amp circuit and is capable of welding 1/4" plate. It is for sale if you are interested ?
 

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here's how i did mine. of course i added the reciever tube before i bought all my attachments. now i have to fab a different hitch or buy a bunch of couplers for the attachments. i didn't plan that one out too well. i like LLigetfa's design. i may do something like that but add a receiver tube. or simply add a clevis hole to the mower just above the existing reciever tube.
 

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I'd get the LLigetfa hitch if one was available. Its self reinforcing and multi-purpose...that's that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The thing I'm finding as I search on this is that, at least for a beginnering, arc welding (MIG, specifically) is the way to go.

I am not sure, however, why I would want to go MIG over a flux-core welder, where the consumable electrode is wrapped in flux. That sounds easier, because then I wouldn't have a bottle of inert gas to worry about flowing over the electrode... right?
 

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Interesting--how can it output more current than it draws? Can you only weld in "bursts" and you have to wait for it to recharge capacitors?
Electricity can be manipulated in many ways without violating Newton's laws of conservation of energy. The input of the welder would be 110 volts and less than 30 amps of current, but the output would be 70 amps of current at some lower voltage. The energy (watts) used in a circuit is the result of multiplying the voltage in volts times the current in amps. So as long as the output in watts does not exceed the input in watts, there is no magic going on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ah, that was the bit of information I was missing, I didn't know the voltage was being lowered.

When I say "flux-core welder", I mean a self-shielded consumable electrode, so there's no inert gas that must be flowed over the wire. I may not have all my terminology correct, I'm still learning :)
 

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Here is how I strengthened mine.

I would say something like would be the best route to go with.

Here's what I did to mine.

http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=139312

What hole wherethe ball goes in the frame it's self,I got a 5/8'' bolt in it bottomed out with a nut resting against the bottom of the tube to help strengthen it.I'll try to remember to take a pic and post it.
 

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you can buy a arc welder or a wire feed welder that runes on 120 volt ..I think my old arc is 70 amp its just a basic arc welder it works mint ...As for your hitch there is a lot of ways you can do this ..I made a plate for my old sears it went over the stock hitch i welded it worked fine ...
I'll second that. I have one and it would work well for this.
 

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Ohm's law gives you the relationship between Voltage, current and resistance. in a single circuit, but the relationship between volts, amps and watts is needed to explain the transfer of power across a transformer.
 
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