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Me want bigger tractor
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this is a bit odd, but I need to get an idea what the inside of the muffler on my X540 looks like. Like, where the baffles and packing are, if any. I am trying to rig up a mosquito fogger for my tractor on the cheap, and need to figure out where the best spot in the exhaust is to drip or spray the insecticide in.

:thanku:
--John
 

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Right in the top I have seen them in the past. And the fellow used Kerosene. Worked terrific. I'll be honest, I've thought about doing the same thing with my X500. Same muffler, I imagine. I just dont remember how much he had dripping into the muffler. Good luck with your bug control.
 

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Me want bigger tractor
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry I didn't see your response sooner. :fing20:

I took off the spark arrestor to try to get a better look inside, and that turned out to be a somewhat futile move. I broke the heads off of three out of the six screws holding it in place, and once it was off I didn't get much of a good look inside. The only thing I was able to determine is that there is about 1/2" of clear space at the bottom of the muffler, so I decided to drill a hole for my entry point at the bottom in this space, across from the outlet for the spark arrestor.

I ran 1/4" stainless steel tubing all the way into the muffler until it hit the back side, then I made a couple of bends and slipped the heat shield over the tubing. I had to make a few more good bends in the tubing to allow a metal bracket on the hood to clear so that it would close properly. Next, I ran it straight up to the front end of the radiator, then bent it 90 degrees so it ran alongside the radiator toward the back of the tractor. I then enlarged what I assume is a drain hole in the black plastic where it meets the top rear of the green hood, and ran the tubing out here. I used a brass valve with 1/4" compression fittings to control the flow of insecticide, and put a small stub of tubing on the top side. I clamped on a piece of fuel hose with a 1/4" inner diameter to the stub.

To test run it, I simply used a funnel with the fuel hose snugly pushed into the bottom. All I can say is WOW! Depending on how much I opened up the valve, I was able to get some REALLY thick, billowing clouds of fog. Tonight, I used a slightly higher-tech method. I connected the open end of the fuel hose to the wand of a pump sprayer I have. I poured the insecticide in here and pumped it up good, and then I was able to crack the brass valve about where I wanted it and just use the trigger on the pump sprayer wand to control the fog on/off.

I think I will take this another step further and purchase a 12VDC pump and a pressure regulator so that I can just hit a button to turn the fog on or off. I will probably use a vented plastic gas can mounted behind the seat as a tank for the insecticide, and run tubing from the tank to the pump.

For what I paid for the parts for this, I'm probably getting the same fog output as a $1200+ commercial fogger. I am definitely happy with the results!

:trink39:

--John
 

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Use a X520 or X540 they smoke enough on start-up to clear the area:fing20::banghead3:crybaby:
 

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Run ahead of the pack
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Sorry I didn't see your response sooner. :fing20:

I took off the spark arrestor to try to get a better look inside, and that turned out to be a somewhat futile move. I broke the heads off of three out of the six screws holding it in place, and once it was off I didn't get much of a good look inside. The only thing I was able to determine is that there is about 1/2" of clear space at the bottom of the muffler, so I decided to drill a hole for my entry point at the bottom in this space, across from the outlet for the spark arrestor.

I ran 1/4" stainless steel tubing all the way into the muffler until it hit the back side, then I made a couple of bends and slipped the heat shield over the tubing. I had to make a few more good bends in the tubing to allow a metal bracket on the hood to clear so that it would close properly. Next, I ran it straight up to the front end of the radiator, then bent it 90 degrees so it ran alongside the radiator toward the back of the tractor. I then enlarged what I assume is a drain hole in the black plastic where it meets the top rear of the green hood, and ran the tubing out here. I used a brass valve with 1/4" compression fittings to control the flow of insecticide, and put a small stub of tubing on the top side. I clamped on a piece of fuel hose with a 1/4" inner diameter to the stub.

To test run it, I simply used a funnel with the fuel hose snugly pushed into the bottom. All I can say is WOW! Depending on how much I opened up the valve, I was able to get some REALLY thick, billowing clouds of fog. Tonight, I used a slightly higher-tech method. I connected the open end of the fuel hose to the wand of a pump sprayer I have. I poured the insecticide in here and pumped it up good, and then I was able to crack the brass valve about where I wanted it and just use the trigger on the pump sprayer wand to control the fog on/off.

I think I will take this another step further and purchase a 12VDC pump and a pressure regulator so that I can just hit a button to turn the fog on or off. I will probably use a vented plastic gas can mounted behind the seat as a tank for the insecticide, and run tubing from the tank to the pump.

For what I paid for the parts for this, I'm probably getting the same fog output as a $1200+ commercial fogger. I am definitely happy with the results!

:trink39:

--John
Picture of your set up would be nice. :D
 

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Me want bigger tractor
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
For the insecticide, I used a commercial product called Pyrocide 100 that is designed for use in thermal foggers. You can purchase it online easily at a number of pest control sites. I had previously been using this in a handheld Burgess fogger, but that gave up the ghost recently, and was never that practical for 1/2 acre anyway, so I decided to find another option. Commercial units are $1200 minimum, and I had a hard time stomaching that price tag.

The commercial insecticide is pretty expensive, considering how much is used to create a decent fog. What I may do is purchase a 5-gallon container of clean-burning kerosene from Home Depot, and use concentrated insecticide mixed with this to create my own mix.

As far as safety goes, I use a full-face 3M respirator when I am fogging. The cartridges are P100/OV, which means they are rated for organic vapors and are the most resistant to oil particulates, filtering near 100% of particulates. I would not recommend that anyone use a thermal fogger without at least a half-mask respirator with an organic vapor cartridge.

I will get some pics posted up later today. :fing32:

--John
 

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Me want bigger tractor
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As promised, here are some pictures of the setup. No wise cracks about how dirty my tractor is. It's pretty dry here right now, and I have less grass than I'd like in a lot of spots. :banghead3


Here's where I drilled the hole in the bottom of the muffler and stuck the 1/4 tubing in. I pushed this all the way in to the bottom. The hole I drilled is on the opposite side of where the muffler exhausts into the spark arrestor.



I then slipped the heat shield over the top of the tubing. There is a hole on the left and right side of the heat shield that was already the perfect size to fit the 1/4" tubing through.





I had to make some pretty good bends in the tubing to allow a steel bar on the back side of the hood grille to clear. This was necessary to be able to shut the hood all the way.





I ran the tubing alongside the radiator toward the driver's seat.



I had to slightly enlarge the drain hole in this black plastic area to get the tubing to fit through.





For last night's fogging run, I hooked up my pump sprayer to the fuel line using a hose clamp, and then ran the other end to the tubing stub on top of the brass valve.






Kills bugs DEAD! I need to get some video of this thing in action. :thThumbsU

I get insane amounts of mosquitoes here when it's wet and humid in the summer. Every so often over the years I have tried researching ways to control them, but haven't found any really great information. This year, I found quite a lot of new info, and had the opportunity to talk to some people who work at professional mosquito control companies. Putting all these new pieces together, I think my strategy is going to be to use a backpack sprayer to treat the foliage around the house and also the siding around doors as a barrier. This should be very effective as a long-term control solution. The Stihl SR 420 sprayer that I am eyeing also has a ULV attachment for spraying a fine mist that will linger. I will probably use the fogger on the tractor primarily when there are large mosquito population explosions. The fog is awesome at flushing them out of their hiding spots and killing them, especially in the really dense foliage.


I hope all of this helps someone else with their mosquito problems. :fing32:

--John
 
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