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Argh! Need the advice of smarter JD owners! My L130, with ca. 365 hours, has a worsening steering problem, and I hope someone has figured out a fix for it. Problem: too much toe-out on front wheels--way too much. I've studied the thing with care and see no way to adjust any part of the steering. Asked dealer: said only "cure" was to replace all front end and steering parts at once. Looked at new parts: no help there--the new ones are just new, not shaped or configured in any way differently. This problem causes troubling steering glitches on any uneven surface, and is wearing out front tires very rapidly. I looked at new versions of same tractor--and many of them also show excessive toe-out right from the start! John Deere ain't what it used to be, it seems.
Thanks in advance for any help anyone can give. chuckm
 

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:MTF_wel2: Glad you are here. JD guys should be along soon. I think some of them repaired theirs by reworking the linkage so that it is adjustable. :goodl:
 

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Unfortunately, the L series do not have adjustable front axles. They are designed to be price competitive and don't have the deluxe features of the more expensive models. It would not be difficult to modify existing tie rods or find adjustable tie rods from another model to remedy this problem. One question though, did this problem always exist, or did it develop over time? Maybe you have something bent?
 

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This is from the 2007 LA-series Technical Manual. It sounds like a really elaborate way to calculate the toe-in, but it's how they came up with a spec.
Toe-In Adjustment
Purpose:
Correct excessive front wheel toe-in.
Procedure:
1. Park machine safely.
2. Measure the distance from the floor to the center of the wheel hub on one of the front tires.
3. Use the measurement and mark the center rib on the front and rear of each front tire at that distance from the floor.
4. Push the front of the tires outward.
5. Measure the distance between the marks on the front of the tires. Measure the distance between the marks on the rear of the tires.
6. Subtract the front measurement from the rear measurement. Record this number.
7. Push the front of the tires inward (together).
8. Measure the distance between the marks on the front of the tires. Measure the distance between the marks on the rear of the tires.
9. Subtract the front measurement from the rear measurement. Record this number.
10.Add the two recorded measurements. This is the amount of toe-in.
Results:
• If the toe-in is within specification, toe-in is correct.
Note: Adjustable tie rods can be ordered as replacements.
• If the toe-in is out of specification, replace the tie-rods.
Specifications:
Toe-In (Acceptable). . . . . . . . 40 ± 20 mm (1.5 ± 0.75 in.)
Toe-In (Target). . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 - 60 mm (1.5 - 2.25 in.)
I haven't noticed any toe-in issues on mine, but I do have so much positive camber on both front wheels that it's noticable without a measurement. (The wheel is on an angle such that the top of the wheel sticks out away from the tractor farther than the bottom of the wheel.) It's been like that since day one, and doesn't seem to be a problem. All of the other LA's I have seen appear to be made the same way.
 

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Have you checked the front wheel bushings and spindles recently. At 300 hrs I had to replace all of them on my old L series.. See how much play your wheels have when the front end is jacked up.

Good news is if they are shot they are cheap and very easy to replace. If I remember right it was probably $50 or less for everything.
 

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Argh! Need the advice of smarter JD owners! My L130, with ca. 365 hours, has a worsening steering problem, and I hope someone has figured out a fix for it. Problem: too much toe-out on front wheels--way too much. I've studied the thing with care and see no way to adjust any part of the steering. Asked dealer: said only "cure" was to replace all front end and steering parts at once. Looked at new parts: no help there--the new ones are just new, not shaped or configured in any way differently. This problem causes troubling steering glitches on any uneven surface, and is wearing out front tires very rapidly. I looked at new versions of same tractor--and many of them also show excessive toe-out right from the start! John Deere ain't what it used to be, it seems.
Thanks in advance for any help anyone can give. chuckm
Part numbers

1 GY20492 ROD, RH DRAGLINK ASSY. ADJUSTABLE
1 GY20491 ROD, LH DRAGLINK ASSY, ADJUSTABLE

Are what you need, Plus any worn parts, bushings, or others to allow you to set proper toe in.

My L130 was so 'slew footed' the wife couldn't drive it, it was too hard to steer.

$66 later and about 1/2 hour of my time with a tape measure and my metric wrenches, proper toe in and great steering was achieved. I can now steer with 2 fingers.
 

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the replacement arms are adjustable and you cna fix the issue. i only replaced my left one when the axle broke 2 years ago and that made it worse. i was planing on replacing the other one this summer. then the axle broke again a week or so ago, and now i don't even know if i want to fix it. i keep going back and forth on teh matter.

anyway, :Welcome1:
 
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