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Sorry not a Tractor question but a chipper question. I have a Yardmax chipper and just replaced the blades and I was wondering about the difference between using a regular nut / split washer / flat washer or just a lock nut and a flat washer? I replaced the flat head bolts while replacing the blades because the hex socket on the head was getting worn but I kept the original nut/split washer.

When do you use a lock nut instead of a split washer? Is there too much heat and torque in a chipper to use a nylon locking washer?

thank you
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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I can't speak for the YardMax, and did not even attempt to look it up. But, I offer a few thoughts based on recent replacement of knife on my DR chipper. DR sent new bolts and nuts with the new knife and made a bold and red direction in the instructions to use the bolts and nuts paired with the knife. I assume it was based on the weighed and balanced pairing. As far as the hex head, I assume it was designed for a counter-sunk head and that you matched the angle and depth of the counter sink. I do not believe there would be significant heat build up on the flywheel. So, bottom line, I'd replace with whichever was on originally, either split lock washer and nut or nylok nut.
 

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I would replace what I took off with the same set up...there is a reason for it to be like that......it is possible that something else would work...but I would not take a chance with a moving part like that
 

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I replaced the flat head bolts while replacing the blades because the hex socket on the head was getting worn but I kept the original nut/split washer.
Also replace the nuts. Nuts that have been used once do not have the same holding power when torqued a second time, and even less on subsequent applications.

The technical term used at the seminar that I attended was 'thread conformity'. The nut threads conform to the bolt threads upon initial torque application and cannot conform on subsequent applications. The demonstration of the phenomenon was eye opening, to say the least.
 
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