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What was the point of that xray? Everything you had to see was there!
 

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Great thread.. It's sad that most new-bees never have seen My Tractor Forum and won't , most likely, read beyond " engaging blower" in the owners
manual.
:lalala: Safety equipment, we don't need no stinken Safety equipment :tsk: This is how a snow blower works = :trink23:.
Then the Government will try to make them "more idiot proof" when actually it's "proof of more idiots". :1106:
 

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How about a Youtube video for the noobs out there? I am teaching my 12 and 13 year old sons to use the garden tractor snowblower; I know, snowblowers are dangerous but soon they will be 16 and only interested in cars and girls.

I would think a well done video would sure make my job easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
How about a Youtube video for the noobs out there? I am teaching my 12 and 13 year old sons to use the garden tractor snowblower; I know, snowblowers are dangerous but soon they will be 16 and only interested in cars and girls.

I would think a well done video would sure make my job easier.
Here is a video that my wife and I shot. It is pretty popular on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6h2kjvWF2uU
 

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I'm going to get one of those blinking red lights that bicyclists' place on the back of their seat and pin it to the back of my coat. I always keep looking behind me (will still do it anyway) when I'm down clearing the EOD, part of the street and mailbox. At least someone driving down the road will hopefully see the blinking light and slow down or least know that I am there. The plow trucks have a nasty habit of sneaking up on you when you don't expect it...
 

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I'm going to get one of those blinking red lights that bicyclists' place on the back of their seat and pin it to the back of my coat. I always keep looking behind me (will still do it anyway) when I'm down clearing the EOD, part of the street and mailbox. At least someone driving down the road will hopefully see the blinking light and slow down or least know that I am there. The plow trucks have a nasty habit of sneaking up on you when you don't expect it...
I wired a turn signal flasher into my tractors rear marker lights so now they blink when I put the lights on. It doesn't help with the people who gun for you when you're near the road though.
 

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Why is it when the snow is falling and there is 3"+ on the ground, you can't see 2 feet in front of you a car has to go past your driveway just as you get there with the blower?
Lowe's now sells the little plastic shovel and retainer for snowblower separate. A cheap investment.
The first time I did my Mom's sidewalk I had the chute all the way up like when I do my place. When I was done I stopped in to see if she needed anything. She said she thought the snow as going to come in the front windows. I found that the blower was sending the snow over holly bushes, over her solid porch handrail and putting it against her windows. :O
Have a safe winter.
 

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Adding another tip:

It just occurred to me that I had never checked the Berco snowblower that I bought used to make sure that it actually has shear bolts installed for the augers and impeller (it does). It was certainly possible that the previous owner could have replaced a shear bolt with a regular bolt in the past. I checked them today and replaced the old, rusty shear bolts with new ones. It was worth checking, one bolt was bent and had to be punched out, also I'm glad I learned how to change the PITA impeller bolt in good weather rather than in the middle of a storm!
 

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Another suggestion to keep snow from sticking - Pam or non-stick cooking spray! It might not last as long as a silicone, but its environmentally safe, and most people probably always have a can of it in the kitchen in a pinch.

I've been told it even helps when moving around dirt/soil in the summer (especially if you're using a shovel!)
 

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I got a couple of cans of the wide spray WD40 last season and it worked well at keeping snow from building up in the bucket, augers, impeller and chute. The wide spray makes coating those surfaces quick and easy and prevents rust. We had so many storms that I had to buy a 3rd can before the end of the season.
 

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Great thread, always worth refreshing each season.

One thing I'd add is to remove the shear pins and coat them with grease or anti-sieze, along the entire length of the pin. This will make them much, much easier to remove when broken. This should be done before you use your machine (new or used) for the first time, and each time you replace a pin.

I also grease the mounting pins for the pulley drive housing since I had them rust in place one winter.

Mike
 

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Great tips. I learn more and more as I look into different areas of this site.
 

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This should be obvious, but...

Here's one I have to force myself to follow: When you're doing the driveway and get to the road, turn around and finish the driveway before heading off on other adventures, such as the sidewalk.

It sucks when the machine quits or you break a shear pin, before you've opened up the driveway enough for the cars...

Mike
 

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I've never seen it since but I had DuPont Teflon car wax once on sale I got three bottles and it's perfect for blowers and mower decks. Maybe it's found on the us. It was a whole kit. The tire shine Teflon works good as a spray anywhere you don't want water to stick. But the wax lasts the longest
 

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This should be obvious, but...

Here's one I have to force myself to follow: When you're doing the driveway and get to the road, turn around and finish the driveway before heading off on other adventures, such as the sidewalk.

It sucks when the machine quits or you break a shear pin, before you've opened up the driveway enough for the cars...

Mike
This is truth!...

I always plow the very end of my driveway first,where the DPW trucks pushed in a ton of snow from the road, into the driveway...it's usually twice as deep,wet, and harder to push,and loaded with salt too--doing it first ensures you wont be forced to shovel it by hand should the tractor,truck,plow or snowblower break down,and that is where it'll break most likely too,being the most difficult stuff to remove,and putting the most stress on them...also the salt gets taken off the plow or blower as you do the rest of the driveway...do it last,you'll be putting them away salted,and they'll rust..

Should they break after the worst "wall" of snow at the street is removed,its usually possible to get a running start with your vehicle,and make it out of your driveway,if you had to go out---if the "wall" is there though,chances are good you'll only get high centered on it,leaving your vehicle sticking out half way into the street..making for a tough extraction,and endangering yourself and others when traffic or DPW plows come by,and have to swerve around your stuck vehicle...

I always spray some PAM or use wax on the snowblower chute,and my shovels...dont forget and try doing that after you started using them,it wone be very effective..drain oil brushed on liberally works good also..

Another thing I like doing before starting a snowblowing or plowing event,is to get my wood stove ripping good in my garage--nothing better than having a toasty warm stove to thaw out in front of ,inside a warmer than outdoors garage..I use a wire rack above the stove to hang my hat & gloves on,so they can dry out...it also helps melt snow off the equipment and makes them easier to start too..you could put a pot of soup or water for coffee on to heat up too,it'll be ready by the time your done removing the snow..
 

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Time to bump this thread up again. Should be required reading for anyone planning to use a snowblower. Excellent information here!
 

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Wow, always great to look back through this one!

When I wrote this comment, I was referring to the belly-mounted pulley drive for a tractor attached blower. On my Craftsmans, there are pins holding that assembly in place, going through a bracket. I've had them rust in place.

I also grease the mounting pins for the pulley drive housing since I had them rust in place one winter.

Mike

I saw one prior comment about keeping a spare drive belt on hand. I also keep blower belts (auger and PTO) as well. They seem to be out of stock in the winter, not to mention that you may not even be able to get out of your driveway if one breaks before you finish.

Mike
 
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