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Spare ribs are generally cheaper than loin back ribs, but for quality they sure don't give up anything to the baby backs. In fact, alot of restaurants and competition BBQ cooks prefer them for their meatiness and more uniform, large size. Here's how I do 'em!

What you'll need:

Fresh pork spare ribs, as many racks as you think you need

Old WoodFire Grill KK's 10 BBQ Rub

Honey

BBQ Sauce

Hickory, pecan, apple of cherry wood or chunks

I have a variety of cookers around the house, but I did this particular cook on my Masterbuilt vertical water smoker. No matter what type smoker you are going to use, you want to maintain a fire so that your cooking temperature hovers around 250 degrees. I don't mind dipping down to 225 degrees, and I dont' mind shooting up to 275 degrees, but I would keep it no hotter nor cooler than these temps. So for the vertical smoker, start out with a full chimney of lump charcoal, only half lit when poured into the charcoal pan. Add a chunk of wood to the coals for the smoke. I prefer hickory or pecan, but apple or cherry would also be good choices. Add the water pan if needed to keep the temperature within your targeted range.



While the fire is coming up to temp, prepare the spare ribs by trimming to St. Louis style, using my method outlined here http://www.oldwoodfiregrill.com/?page_id=779. Once you have the ribs trimmed, apply a liberal amount of Old WoodFire Grill KK's 10 BBQ Rub to both sides of the rack (or racks). When the smoker has come up to temp and has leveled off, put the racks on the smoker and close the lid. Let them cook at 250 degrees for about 3 1/2 hours, or until the ends of the bones start to show and they droop on both sides if picked up in the middle with a pair of tongs. When they have reached this point, hit them with a thick glaze of honey and let them simmer on the smoker for another 30 minutes.



After 30 minutes with the honey glaze, you can glaze them with your favorite BBQ sauce if you like, or you can bring them in and serve them "dry". I like them both ways, so I took a few pics of both styles.





The consistency and texture of these ribs is tender, but not fall of the bone, which is the way I personally like my ribs. You have to tug a little when you bite into them to get the meat off of the bone. If you want them fall off the bone tender, there is a method that I will outline in a later post.

 

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Gosh that looks delicious!!! They would go so nice with the Patriots game Sunday evening.
 

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i was trying to find info on that rub on your website but didn't find anything, keep up the good cooking as always
 

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That looks great CDN, I agree w/ BOSOX maybe if the Sox had this @ the club house instead of KFC maybe they would have won more games and it does go good with the cold beer during practice!
 

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Nice que-view.

I prefer the St. Loius myself for the reasons you state. I can get a big double pack of them (2 full racks) at Costco for about $20, much better value than baby backs. I use the 3-2-1 method. Still leaves the meat-tug with the St. Louis I've found.

It's almost Turkey day, I'll be smoking my annual bird. Yields a tender, juicy, delicious gobbler. The smokey drippings make good gravy too. Can't wait.

There's a good site with lots of info at www.amazingribs.com, including rubs and marinades.

I'll have to try the honey glaze, that sounds good.
 

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:not_worth:not_worth:eck21::eck21::eck21::eck21:They look so awesome.I will have to try them this way sometime.what are the other food items with them,they look like jalapeno pepper poppers which are also very tasty .Turkey sounds good too on the smoker.A guy raised some wild black turkeys near here and let them go,hunting season just started so maybe I'll try one lol.
 

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MMMMM mMMMM some good eatin there!!! St. Louis style is the ONLY way I do ribs. I think I have only done 1 rack "wet". I tend to smoke a little lower and slower, which puts more bark on them, but they stand on their own, very rarely have I seen anyone put sauce on my ribs, brisket, or chicken. I do have a nice home made Carolina style sauce for my pulled pork though. Only used a water smoker once and it didnt turn out as well as I wanted, probably because I am not familiar with bullet type techniques. My side box chargriller does fine, but I am building a side box big enough to do a whole hog, not that I ever plan to but you never know. If I can get the heat plates dialed in I will be able to do ribs, chicken, brisket and pork all at the same time on one smoker, AND be able to enter my first sanctioned cook off next spring!
And just what is in the basket beside the ribs in the bottom pic?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
MMMMM mMMMM some good eatin there!!! St. Louis style is the ONLY way I do ribs. I think I have only done 1 rack "wet". I tend to smoke a little lower and slower, which puts more bark on them, but they stand on their own, very rarely have I seen anyone put sauce on my ribs, brisket, or chicken. I do have a nice home made Carolina style sauce for my pulled pork though. Only used a water smoker once and it didnt turn out as well as I wanted, probably because I am not familiar with bullet type techniques. My side box chargriller does fine, but I am building a side box big enough to do a whole hog, not that I ever plan to but you never know. If I can get the heat plates dialed in I will be able to do ribs, chicken, brisket and pork all at the same time on one smoker, AND be able to enter my first sanctioned cook off next spring!
And just what is in the basket beside the ribs in the bottom pic?
Yep, agree with you on the sauce, I like them dry myself, but when I have a crowd, I make a few of both to please everyone. The rub that you use has alot to do with the bark. I use my offset firebox smoker alot too, and will extend the cooking time on it as you mentioned, as they ribs are not directly over the coals. I can also easily maintain 235 degrees on my big smoker, which is what I prefer for ribs. But I like for folks to see that you don't have to have a $2000 rig to turn out great 'que!! Good luck with that new smoker and the cook off, let us know how you do!! And yes, there are some stuffed jalapeno poppers in the basket that my wife makes up that are great, I'll get that on here asap.
 

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That looks great CDN, I agree w/ BOSOX maybe if the Sox had this @ the club house instead of KFC maybe they would have won more games and it does go good with the cold beer during practice!
Nice que-view.

I prefer the St. Loius myself for the reasons you state. I can get a big double pack of them (2 full racks) at Costco for about $20, much better value than baby backs. I use the 3-2-1 method. Still leaves the meat-tug with the St. Louis I've found.

It's almost Turkey day, I'll be smoking my annual bird. Yields a tender, juicy, delicious gobbler. The smokey drippings make good gravy too. Can't wait.

There's a good site with lots of info at www.amazingribs.com, including rubs and marinades.

I'll have to try the honey glaze, that sounds good.
:not_worth:not_worth:eck21::eck21::eck21::eck21:They look so awesome.I will have to try them this way sometime.what are the other food items with them,they look like jalapeno pepper poppers which are also very tasty .Turkey sounds good too on the smoker.A guy raised some wild black turkeys near here and let them go,hunting season just started so maybe I'll try one lol.
Thanks guys, I appreciate it. I will get the popper recipe up here asap, it is awesome!
 

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Took a peek at oldwoodfiregrill.com......gonna have to try the smoked bacon and egg sandwich either tomorrow or Sunday morning!! I always cover my pork with bacon, until the bacon is done when i smoke (helps add some juice and flavor, at least in my imagination), so adding eggs just sweetens the deal.
Not a whole lot of free standing true butcher shops In So California, so it's usually Sams for my meat, and the usually have a decent product. I had some Wagu Brisket from Harry Soo (of Slap Yo Daddy BBQ team) a couple years ago and it's tempting to sell a Tractor just to buy me one of them to 'Q!!!
 
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