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Discussion Starter #1
OK, Iv'e had my X530 less than a week. A few days ago I noticed my right rear was low so I filled and checked the others and all was fine. Tue night I noticed the right rear was totally flat. Aired it up and mowed for about an hr. and checked again and it was good. Tonight it was totally flat again. Aired it up once more then took it off and stuck it in the tub, it is to wide to lay it flat and submerge it so I stood it straight up and screwed around with it but could not get one air bubble to come out.
I plan on dropping it off at the dealer but wondered if anyone had any ideas to check for leaks and I don't want to slime it just yet. I was suspecting a bead or valve stem as I could not see anything in the treads or sidewalls. HDAPs if that makes any difference. Thanks.
 

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I will spray some water mixed with detergent on them and watch to see if it blows bubbles. But I would think that putting it in a water bath would result in the same indication!
 

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dirtgeezer
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jack up the wheel that is flat, so that it don't break the bead from the rim, and slowly roll it as you run a small stream of water over the tire, also check for a rim leak, bubbles and the valve stem and change the inner valve in the stem. It may be a thorn , a nail or a dry wall screw (mine was) I found the screw and bought a plugging kit to keep from having to remove the tire and wheel and take it in to town. The plug worked fine, I got the kit at Tractor Supply. I found my tractor with the flat, and the rim bead was broken. I cleaned the rim and bead, wrapped a 1" nylon ratchet strap around the jacked up tire in the center of the tread and cranked it up tight and used a rubber hammer on the tire to get the bead to hold air and after a while it took air and popped the bead back in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It did dawn on me as I was loading the tire in the truck that I had't taken off the valve stem cover. After doing that I put a few drops of water over the top of stem and LOW and BEHOLD, air bubbles. Tried to tighten it but that made it worse. I screwed in a new core and no more bubbles. We'll see tomorrow when I get home if that is all it was.
 

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I've always found that a paint brush and a container of dish detergent and water works best for finding slow leaks. The soapier the water is, the better it works because it flows into small areas (like tread) better and it sticks around better than plain water while you're looking for the leaks. Just rinse it all off when done.
 

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Well, we're changing your screen name to "Tiny Bubbles" so that we can remember this thread! :ROF :ROF
 

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Enginerd - DieselDork
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777 Posts
Windex is my favorite leak detector.

Bubbles easily, is already in an "easy apply" bottle, and doesn't really make a mess.

I also drink it whenever I have the urge to run naked down the street. (It prevents streaking.)

Aside: Does anyone here run tire sealant? (Like this stuff) I use it in my mountan bike and it's great. But I haven't needed it in my tractor tires yet.
 

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I used tire sealant product that come in a spray can (forget the name??) with a small hose you attach to the valve stem. I have added a little to the front tire of my 345 and it worked great. That was more than 2 years ago.
 
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