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Father of 8!LordHelp'sMe!
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Discussion Starter #1
Well, once again I'm out of oxygen on my torch...so I broke out the 'ol skinny wheel on the 4 1/2" grinder.

Guess I was thinking the skin on a 20 gallon oil drum would have been thicker, but it was fairly thin, and the wheel sliced through it with no problem at all, quite a bit faster than I first thought.

I'm building a packing stove for elk hunting next year, for those that care to know, just figured I'd mention the many uses of cut-off wheels. Wasn't as noisy as I thought it would be too.

Take care all!
 

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Collector of many tractors
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I buy them by the hundreds.... I use the 6" wheels... Much better... I put a bigger guard on my grinder...
 

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Father of 8!LordHelp'sMe!
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Been using Pferd (spelling?), also like just about everything from Norton, their Gemini and Norzon brand are killer.

Flapper wheels are da' bomb too, for those "finer" things.

Speaking of angle grinders, mine is an old Black & Decker. I keep expecting it to 'burn', but so far it hasn't, as a matter of fact, its been a darn good tool. Best part it is the 5/8ths arbor, which is the most common one. Used the Milwaukee ones that are something like a 3/8ths arbor, and a real pain to find disc's for.

Think if I'm ever to replace mine, it'll be with a DeWalt or something. Milwaukee makes some great tools, but their angle grinders just don't seem to hold up. Their hole-shooters are the mack-daddy of drills. Sure can take one **** of a beating, but I've burned up too many of their smaller grinders. Not so with the 9" grinder though, its tough as nails too. I don't like using their "hole-hawg", like my teeth too much. That's one hand tool that has too much power.
 

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I had a B&D 6 amp grinder that I used for several years. I finally burned it up (the first time) when grinding notches into a 1/4" thick small trailer deck so that stake-sides could be added.

Upon tearing it apart (little gets thrown away without a thorough autopsy) I discovered that it had burned out the field winding right at the connection. I was able to solder in a short piece of wire to repair the break; used it for at least six months after that repair, then dropped it right after pushing it too hard (again) and it died again. I assume that the solder on my repair gave loose, but as yet haven't bothered tearing it apart again to fix it. I now have a 7 amp DeWalt grinder.
 

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Father of 8!LordHelp'sMe!
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738 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
What do you guys like for cutting "circles" in heavy gauge sheet metal?
Skinny wheel seems a bit "big" even in a 4" grinder.
 

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What size circles? I use the worn out skinny wheels in my angle grinder. The smaller the circle, the more worn out wheel I use.

I sometimes will use skinny wheels in my Skilsaw as well but not for small circles.
 

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Deceased October 2017
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21,767 Posts
I use one of these, its not a grinder but works well for up to 10 gauge .. I have a few dies and cutters that will do stainless steel also. The biggest hole I can do is 5-5/8"
 

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Father of 8!LordHelp'sMe!
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738 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Well, I've got to make a Door on the end of the barrel for the stove. Thinking of making it flat on top, with a round bottom which would make the circle part about 9" in diameter, perhaps a bit bigger.

Because I want to save the existing metal (using the 2" pipe threaded hole for the vent), that means I can't go crazy with cutting it out, otherwise I'd just use aviation snips. That's how I cut the 4" hole for the flue/vent.

I'll then take some 1/4" pipe with some 3/8" rod for the hinge at the top.


I've used "knock-outs" before, I think they were Greenlee's too.

Don't know if a die grinder would work or not, have been thinking along the same lines myself though.....

Thanks Guys! ;)
 

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If you need to save the piece you cut out to fit back in place, then I would use a metal cutting blade in a Sawzall. What I've done before is drill a series of small holes, then I shallow grind with the angle grinder to connect-the-dots and finish it off with the Sawzall.
 

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Father of 8!LordHelp'sMe!
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Discussion Starter #12
Might just be a good idea!

I'll try the die grinder with the sawzall, then look around for a piece of metal for the top!
 

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I made the cut out for my first barrel stove with a sabre saw and metal cutting blades,I broke a few blades,but did the door opening and stove pipe hole with it without too much difficulty ,once I learned screwing a peice of 1/4" plywood onto the barrel with the template drawn on it for the door cutout helped immensly, to prevent it from chattering and bouncing like crazy..doing the stove pipe hole was a bit harder,being curved I couldn't use any plywood..
I used my smallest cutting torch tip to cut the pipe hole on my second barrel stove I built..came out a bit ragged ,but not too bad..

I used a 6" hole saw to cut the hole out of my quonset garage's metal wall on one pipe,the one for an oil furnace I used a circle cutter,it worked,but it was a lot more difficult than the hole saw was..

If your making a barrel stove from scratch,you can use a cast iron clean out door for a chimmney,I used one on one of my home brewed ones and it works perfect..its a bit smaller than the door I got in the barrel stove "kit" I made my first one from,but just as rugged..only cost 18 bucks at an old hardware store locally..I just drilled holes in its flange and used 1/4" bolts to install it..
 

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2,203 Posts
I have 2 makitas with cords and an 18volt dewalt. I love the cut off wheels, seem to be just right for cutting off bolt heads and such. I keep a knotted wire wheel in the cordless one to clean weld slag and it is awesome for rust removal. I keep the other in my service van, the cutoff wheels are great for rusted circulator bolts, and the wire wheel is great for cleaning threads on pipe nipples. I still have my recip. saws but tend to use the cut off wheels more often. /ED
 

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Father of 8!LordHelp'sMe!
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Discussion Starter #17
How much power does the cordless have?

Grinding seems to take quite a bit of power, so I couldn't imagine a cordless having much power to get the big jobs done.
 

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I love mine, it works great. Obviously the batteries will wear down, but not bad. As stated I love it when I'm welding (w/ a knotted wire wheel)to make a bare spot for a ground or to clean slag. It is also great to take to the junk yard with a cut-off wheel in it. It is great for cutting off bolt heads and nuts. I find it more useful than the recip saw and the batteries last about the same in both tools. Since I switched to the yellow and black batteries labeled xrp I've been happy with all the cordless tools. Mine are the 18 volt Dewalt. Ed
 
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