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W5CPT
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When I use the tractor (JD2305) to clean up around the yard, I usually turn it off if I am going to be off it for more than 10 minutes or so, using the chain saw or something like that. When I jump off to pick up something and throw it on the carryall, I leave it running (parking brake set). I have noticed that in truck stops the drivers leave their diesel engines running for long periods of time. I know that a lot of wear happens during starting as the oil pump is building pressure. So is 10 minutes a reasonable amount of time or should I lengthen it and if so, how long?
 

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Seems I've seen this question here before... can't remember the general opinion, but I'll say that that's just about how I do it too. My BX2350 is supposed to be allowed to idle for roughly 5 minutes after working it hard to cool down prior to shutdown as I recall. How hard its been running is another thing to consider in this debate.

If you switch to a full synthetic oil I'd think that the start-up wear would be even less of an issue.
 

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AKA Moses Lawnagan
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The owner's manual on my X748 (same engine) says extended idling "will waste fuel and cause carbon buildup". That said, I idle mine a fair amount when I'm out in the yard and have to get off frequently to pick up sticks, or while attaching an implement, etc. I generally run it a bit higher than the lowest it will go, just to maintain higher oil pressure. I'd rather do that than constantly have to restart, save some wear and tear on the starter. I usually shut off if I'm going to be more than 5 minutes, though.

Large diesel trucks generally idle their engines to run the cab a/c or heat and provide electricity, if the driver is using the sleeper, or to provide power to the trailer to run its a/c (reefers, if they don't have an auxiliary power source). I was always told a big truck used more fuel to start than it did to idle for an hour, but 'tain't so. It's one of the largest wastes of fuel in the US, estimates run to several million gallons a year in the US alone. There are truck stops now that have "pods" that the trucker can hook up to that provides "shore power" and a/c, and they charge less for the service than the fuel costs for the trucker to provide his own.
 

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When I use the tractor (JD2305) to clean up around the yard, I usually turn it off if I am going to be off it for more than 10 minutes or so, using the chain saw or something like that. When I jump off to pick up something and throw it on the carryall, I leave it running (parking brake set). I have noticed that in truck stops the drivers leave their diesel engines running for long periods of time. I know that a lot of wear happens during starting as the oil pump is building pressure. So is 10 minutes a reasonable amount of time or should I lengthen it and if so, how long?
Sounds like a safe and sane way to operate. Letting an engine idle once in a while is beneficial to the longevity of the machine. It lets it cool off after a good work out. :trink40:
 

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Todays diesel engines need very little warm up or cool down periods. Idling is a waste of fuel & money. 3-5 minutes of warm or cool down is the max you would need. slkpk
 

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I'm with SLKPK.. 3 to 5 minutes.. UNTILL you get into the bigger units with a turbo.. 5 to 10 minutes depending on how hard you worked it..


For the big rigs they leave em run to keep air in the air brake system..
 

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According the engine diagnostic computer on the hoe I run, the engine uses the same amount of fuel in two minutes of idling as it does to start it warm.
 

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I'm with SLKPK.. 3 to 5 minutes.. UNTILL you get into the bigger units with a turbo.. 5 to 10 minutes depending on how hard you worked it..


For the big rigs they leave em run to keep air in the air brake system..
Our road tractors 435hp CATS with turbos only require 3-5 minutes cool down. slkpk
 

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Turbo diesels exhaust runs around 1200 degree or more. The idle time after a run, brings the temp. of the turbo center section down to around 300 degrees. This keeps the oil from cooking, or coaking up the two bearings. Road tractors are being equiped with frame mounted generators to run all of the cab / sleeper accessaries. they use about a gallon of fuel all night.
As for the air brakes. The parking brakes are spring loaded. The parking brakes are on or locked, when the brake canisters,have no air. The air pressure is used to hold the brakes off.
I let my tractor run, and I also shut it off. So, I can't help you there.:fing20:
 

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I don't know if the OP's tractor is diesel or gas but I've heard it both ways. I don't know whats the right thing to do. I guess I'd say any more than a couple of minutes, just turn it off. I know that at idle a lot more wear occurs because an engine vibrates more at idle than at fast RPM. For instance, my 400cc scoot idles at 1450rpm and vibrates badly, shaking the windshield visibly. At cruise, 5000rpm, it's smooth as silk.

I don't know what to tell you. I've let mine run, and shut it off. I don't think there is a definite answer to this. Do what you feel is comfy. The only thing I would say is just remember, if you do time based maintenance, extended idle will result in more maintenance being done.
 

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Turbo diesels exhaust runs around 1200 degree or more. The idle time after a run, brings the temp. of the turbo center section down to around 300 degrees. This keeps the oil from cooking, or coaking up the two bearings. Road tractors are being equiped with frame mounted generators to run all of the cab / sleeper accessaries. they use about a gallon of fuel all night.
As for the air brakes. The parking brakes are spring loaded. The parking brakes are on or locked, when the brake canisters,have no air. The air pressure is used to hold the brakes off.
I let my tractor run, and I also shut it off. So, I can't help you there.:fing20:
i meant for the guys just stopping for lunch and such.. not for the over night guys.. sorry if i left my reply confusing or miss leading.
 

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I am a shut it off.

This doesn't apply to CUTS but many places where I live, schools and such, it is against the law to leave a vehicle running and the fines are stiff.

I always found it a shame at truck stops all these trucks would be running in some cases extended periods, a real waste of fuel.
 

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As an old farmer next to me says, diesels were made for pulling, not idling. If i get off my tractor for more than a few minutes, i'll bump the idle speed up to around 1200RPM.
When i mow or pull a plow or disc, i'll run it in a higher gear back to the barn at lower RPM's to let it cool off some & idle for a minute or two at the barn before shutting it off.
I'm not saying this is the right thing to do, i've never had any fuel problems(injectors or pumps) though.

Ronnie
 

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I am a shut it off.

This doesn't apply to CUTS but many places where I live, schools and such, it is against the law to leave a vehicle running and the fines are stiff.

I always found it a shame at truck stops all these trucks would be running in some cases extended periods, a real waste of fuel.
Well, to defend truckers, I wouldn't ask them to sit in a cab overnight in south Louisiana heat and humidity without an AC. I'm so glad some truck stops are including pods now that they can plug into. The amp draw of a truck cab is low, as everything is 12 volts and designed to draw minimum current because not a tremendous amount is available while out on the open road. This would make truck stops less noisy, less polluting, etc etc.

Kudos to the truck stops.
 

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Well, to defend truckers, I wouldn't ask them to sit in a cab overnight in south Louisiana heat and humidity without an AC. I'm so glad some truck stops are including pods now that they can plug into. The amp draw of a truck cab is low, as everything is 12 volts and designed to draw minimum current because not a tremendous amount is available while out on the open road. This would make truck stops less noisy, less polluting, etc etc.

Kudos to the truck stops.
Perhaps, my sister has a trucking company in the southern states, around 52 Freightliners in her fleet, she tracks everything with GPS and if a truck is parked and running, she shuts it off. I know what they use in fuel, it would be cheaper and probably just as comfortable to rent a room for a few hours at the truck stop.
 
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