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I am finally building a shed for my X590. By the way you need 64” doors to accommodate a X590 with a 48” deck and PowerFlow and an inch on either side.

It’s built with a pier and beam construction and as a result is about 18” off the ground. 1” subfloor, 6” floor joists, 8” beams, 4” pier. In retrospect I’d have put the pier a bit lower. Hindsight is 20:20.



Is there any guidance on design or maximum ramp angle for the X590? It’s all very nice having a shed, but not much use if I can’t get the tractor in


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I'd put a piece of pressure treat in front of the opening and extending a few feet on either side...this will protect your siding. I'd then back fill to create a ramp. A few "test runs" will tell you if it's too steep and can be lengthened or shortened as needed. Bob
 

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As far as guidance or design, you could look at the ADA designs for wheelchair ramps. That will provide a nice gentle slope allowing the tractor & mowing deck to clear easily. Generally, it is a 1:12 ratio, or for a 1 foot rise the ramp would be 12 feet long. Adjust to your own needs.
 

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Good start on your shed. I chose a pre-built shed about 15 years ago, but had it set on a 12" high stone pad. So, coupled with the floor substructure of the shed, I needed a ramp about the same height you do. Here is an old thread of my construction, pre-built setting, and ramp design/construction:

https://www.mytractorforum.com/52-workshops-garage-shed-discussions/198695-setting-pre-built-shed-building-access-ramp.html

Two things I chose to do that may be useful:

1 - I sawed off the top of my ramp joist to make a better final approach angle to my shed (see the pictures)
2 - I did not connect the ramp to the shed - allowing them to settle and shift (due to frost heave in my area) independently. This has worked well, 15 years later, and no maintenance needed on either.

Good luck, hope you wrap up construction before the snow flies!
 

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Consider making the ramp curved so that you don't bottom out at the threshold. What material do you plan to make the ramp out of?
 

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There are 3 different critical angles depending on the attachment.

Snow thrower/blower - The angle formed from the ground when a straightedge is touching the ground contact patch of the front tire and the lowest point of the thrower/blower in its raised position. This is the maximum front departure angle at the bottom of the ramp

Mid mount mower deck - The angle formed between the front and rear tire ground contact patches and the middle of the deck shell edge when fully raised. This is the maximum angle between the ramp and the shed floor.

Rear implement - The angle formed between the rear tire ground contact patch and the bottom of the implement in its raised position. This is the rear departure angle at the bottom of the ramp.

Hint: Use something less that the maximum angle just in case a tire develops a slow leak.

A berm in front of the door as suggested by rwmeyer would be a good starting point. You will likely need at least 7-9' of ramp from the edge of the floor to grade to cover all three angles.

An inclinometer would be a handy tool, or a digital level. Otherwise your left with calculating the geometry of a triangle, or trial and error.
 

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Depending on your location and usage, will it be damp, winter usage, etc.

There is nothing slicker than a board when it's wet.

The deck needs to clear the apex going in and out.

My 16' trailer with fold down ramp is somewhat steep and gets petty close to the deck at transition from ramp to trailer, it has a four foot fold down ramp and the trailer sits about 16" of the ground. I try to find a low spot to load and unload my 455.

I would go at least 8 feet, more if you can.

CCMoe
 

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How about a pair of arched aluminum loading ramps. You could build a set of stars to walk in and the ramp will go right over them to get the tractor in and out.
 

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I put a small deck at the doors and a gradual ramp to the grass then landscaped around the ramp, will look pretty nice in a few years when the trees grow up. Decking is composite over pressure treated framing. I was worried that it might be slick when wet but the texture of the composite boards provides good traction even with smooth sole shoes.
 

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I would have suggested making the door a little wider, so you have more clearance on the sides, both for any trim you may decide to add around the doorway, if you use doors, they may reduce the available width a bit, and to make it easier to get in/out of the shed with the tractor.
 

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I'd put a piece of pressure treat in front of the opening and extending a few feet on either side...this will protect your siding. I'd then back fill to create a ramp. A few "test runs" will tell you if it's too steep and can be lengthened or shortened as needed. Bob
This approach worked for the shed (similar height and design as this one) I built at my last house. I used #2 to dust crushed stone that naturally packed well and was impervious to about everything.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wow, thanks for all the thoughtful replies! There’s a lot more to a simple ramp than I thought.

Probably for now I’m going to hit The Home Depot for some aluminum ramps. This will keep me going whilst I do an actual design.

I’m very tempted to do some grading to bring the level up a bit so the ramp doesn’t need to be so long. Also considering a much steeper ramp than a 1/12,

My barn has a 6” concrete lip on the way in and it’s still quite possible to get the tractor in (though the doors are only 40” wide so the mower deck won’t go through), so a step by the door is something I should consider. Maybe not 6”!


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This approach worked for the shed (similar height and design as this one) I built at my last house. I used #2 to dust crushed stone that naturally packed well and was impervious to about everything.

So you got crushed stone delivered and then dumped it in a pile? That sounds like an attractive option.


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Discussion Starter #14
I would have suggested making the door a little wider, so you have more clearance on the sides, both for any trim you may decide to add around the doorway, if you use doors, they may reduce the available width a bit, and to make it easier to get in/out of the shed with the tractor.

I didn’t route the door jambs yet, this should give the clearance I need. I found my other 64” gate is plenty wide enough so fingers crossed!

Definitely not straightforward to widen the door now :)


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Just a thought about the door or doors. An overhead garage door is my preference, since a swinging door will run into any snow-ice that may be outside. But then again, you didn’t say when you planned to use it. Spring, Summer, Fall use only eliminates the snow issue, but then, when you find out how much you enjoy the X590, you will want to use it year round. Then comes the question of what happens when you run a blower over grass, since you may not be able to just drive through the snow. Besides if you have a blower on the tractor, you might as well use it. My driveway is concrete from the house to the road, but gravel from the detached garage to the concrete driveway. The runners can be adjusted, but I chose to make some extenders that quickly attach to the runners with a couple of wingnuts. I posted a link for them on MTF. They also work very well on grass, leaving about an inch of snow and eliminated my scrapping the the grass. I also find a garage door opener very handy. After leaving the garage,, I can just push the button to close the garage door so snow doesn’t blow in the whole time I’m out blowing and then open it before putting the tractor away.
 

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I know it's too late for the PO, but for others, RT3360 is right, a 9x7' garage door is the way to go. Even on the 12' end of my 12x16 shed I can get my X585 and x748 in and out pretty easily and stored side by side. My ramp is 5' long but the rise is about 8". The material is "horizontal" PT 2x6's. In winter the tractors sometimes need 4wd to back in, especially with the 47 snowblower hanging off the front, and the 318 needs chains, but a handful of sand goes a long way.

20190220_141833.jpg
 

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I know it's too late for the PO, but for others, RT3360 is right, a 9x7' garage door is the way to go. Even on the 12' end of my 12x16 shed I can get my X585 and x748 in and out pretty easily and stored side by side. My ramp is 5' long but the rise is about 8". The material is "horizontal" PT 2x6's. In winter the tractors sometimes need 4wd to back in, especially with the 47 snowblower hanging off the front, and the 318 needs chains, but a handful of sand goes a long way.
I did a garage door like this in the end of the shed (12'x18') at my current house. In my opinion a garage door is the best option. Next time, if there is one, I'm doing a roll-up door as the normal one impacts access to storage above when the door is up.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just a thought about the door or doors. An overhead garage door is my preference, since a swinging door will run into any snow-ice that may be outside. But then again, you didn’t say when you planned to use it. Spring, Summer, Fall use only eliminates the snow issue, but then, when you find out how much you enjoy the X590, you will want to use it year round. Then comes the question of what happens when you run a blower over grass, since you may not be able to just drive through the snow. Besides if you have a blower on the tractor, you might as well use it. My driveway is concrete from the house to the road, but gravel from the detached garage to the concrete driveway. The runners can be adjusted, but I chose to make some extenders that quickly attach to the runners with a couple of wingnuts. I posted a link for them on MTF. They also work very well on grass, leaving about an inch of snow and eliminated my scrapping the the grass. I also find a garage door opener very handy. After leaving the garage,, I can just push the button to close the garage door so snow doesn’t blow in the whole time I’m out blowing and then open it before putting the tractor away.

I use it year-round, in deep winter I will park it behind the convertible in the garage. I have a Johnny Bucket Plow which is plenty enough for the light snow we get in PA. Snow blower is overkill.

In summer it just doesn’t fit in the garage with the convertible... well it does, just.


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So you got crushed stone delivered and then dumped it in a pile? That sounds like an attractive option.

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I had leftover from a driveway project. It was more of a ramp than a pile and being in the woods it looked and functioned fine.
 
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I am finally building a shed for my X590. By the way you need 64” doors to accommodate a X590 with a 48” deck and PowerFlow and an inch on either side.

It’s built with a pier and beam construction and as a result is about 18” off the ground. 1” subfloor, 6” floor joists, 8” beams, 4” pier. In retrospect I’d have put the pier a bit lower. Hindsight is 20:20.



Is there any guidance on design or maximum ramp angle for the X590? It’s all very nice having a shed, but not much use if I can’t get the tractor in


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This calculator may help you. For every inch above the ground to the floor level you need 12 inches of a ramp length. So, if you have 18 inches above the ground, you need a 18 foot long ramp. If you build the ground up in front of the shed and tamp it down real good where as you have 6 inches or 8 inches above the ground to the floor level then you need a 6 foot ramp length or 8 foot ramp length. Just input your rise and press calculate. Its a good calculator for building wheel chair ramps to front doors.

https://www.ezaccess.com/residential/tools/incline-calculator?productResults=1




My shed is 4 inches above the ground. My ramp is 4 feet long. You may want to limit the amount of windows because you may need wall space to hang shelves. One of two small windows are okay. Good luck on your build. Show us the finished product. Here 's mine 12'x16'. My doors overlap the bottom edge of the floor by 2 inches, so I have to move the ramp boards to open and close it. The doors are rodent entry proof and rain entry proof. If the doors are cut flush with the floor then snakes, mice, and rain can enter.
 

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