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Ok, I'm new to tractor ownership (took me 36yrs of whining & saving to get my first N) I'm primarily moving dirt leveling about an acre and digging it from the back 2 acres. I don't have filled tires. Or weights.

My questions are: Is Calcium (which evidently destroys rims over time) installed as a powder? Or is it a saltwater type solution that fills about 4/5 of the tire?

I heard someone talking about using beet juice....

TSC sells a kit from Slime where you can use a garden hose to fill your rims with water (Again I'm assuming you wouldn't fill them completely) but then you've got that freezing issue - that'd make for an erratic ride over the winter.

Is there a reason I don't use a 50/50 antifreeze mix and partially fill the rim?

Are Rim weights the way to go for traction?

Should I get suitcases and fill them with concrete to hang on a mount at the back - KIDDING, but what about suitcase weights?

Or, do I just keep using the thing and tell the kids not to report wheelies to my wife? Yes, I know weight for traction and weight on the front end are different animals, when I get the front bumper on it may help with that wheelie thing.

Someone set me straight!
 

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Calcium is a liquid. It is heavier than water.
Beet juice is also heavier than water.
50/50 antifreeze is lighter than water.
Water can freeze.
Suitcase weights are cantilevered behind the axle (or in front) and serve a slightly different purpose.
 

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I have calcium choride solution in the rears on my 8N. really helps when grading up hill on my drive way. It is corrosive if the tubes leak, but a lot cheaper than beet juice or other solutions. some people use windshield wiper fluid also. local tire company came out and installed the calcium cloride.. Wheel weights are fine if you can find them. Sounds like you need weight on the front more than the back. front bumber will add some weight but not all that much. If you are poping the front wheels off the ground, I would be very careful and keep it safe.
 

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:ditto: to what's already been said...

Weight on the rear of the tractor (whether it's wheel weights or loaded tires) will improve your traction. If you have a problem, while moving dirt, etc, where the rear wheels slip a lot... then you need rear weight. If it's your front end getting light... well weight on the rear won't help much. If you've got 16" wheels on the front... you could load your front tires, BUT that's going to make your steering that much harder... and really even a 16" tire isn't going to hold enough liquid to make a huge difference. If your hydraulics are strong enough that you're lifting the front end off the ground... well, unfortunately you've reached the limits of an 8N (lift-wise)... and quit bragging on your hydraulics (kidding).
 

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The others have covered the weights but I think we need to address the reason you are doing wheelies. Are you in hilly country or is it bad operating technique over sized equipment?
 

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Rim Guard is available for tractors (beet juice) and they claim it is 33% heavier than water, won't freeze until -35 degrees, won't rust your rims, is non-toxic to humans and pets and won't damage the ground if it leaks! You would have to find a Rim Guard dealer close to you though. I understand a lot of tractor tire companies have it available!
 

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Wheel weights and loaded tires can also be added to the front tires. Note that if nothing heavy on the back it will make it harder to steer. also 19's will cut more into the ground. If you are cutting across you lawn to get where you're going it might make the wife unhappy.
I am putting a set of axle weights for sale in the ad section if you are interested. Can be delivered to the penns cave show on friday.

Kirk

Kirk
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the info guys. The wheelies were driving out of a rut with a full load in the slipscoop. The ground I'm digging in is fairly level though it is unturned - lot's of roots and prarie type grass. I'm getting a single bottom plow - they tell me I should plow before scooping. As it is now, I get half a load in the scoop and then the tires break loose; granted that's when I had the scoop reversed for backing up - so the tires weren't biting as well as they should.

I've got 16" front wheels and I just put a set of 265/75 truck tires on it - it looks like a kids toy...... now it's hard to steer. What's the largest (tallest) 3-rib I could put on there (for ground clearance) and still steer easily.
 

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You could put a 600 or 650-16 but if you are not plowing or plowing very little you could use implement tires to help your hard steering. I have 5.50-16 implements on my 850 and it steers almost like it had power and I do everything with it. Look at the pics I have posted of it and you can see the tires.
 

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You could put a 600 or 650-16 but if you are not plowing or plowing very little you could use implement tires to help your hard steering. I have 5.50-16 implements on my 850 and it steers almost like it had power and I do everything with it. Look at the pics I have posted of it and you can see the tires.

Also consider loading your front tires with windshield anti freeze. It is cheap and safe and easy to find, plus you can do it yourself.
 
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