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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I picked up a 6600 with a seized engine. Looks like the stack rotted out and they had a tin can covering the exhaust and it blew off and filled the cylinders with water and rusted out the cylinder walls.
I picked up this machine for 1k canadian did I get a good fair deal or just I buy a boat ancher ? Does anyone know if these engines have sleeves from the factory?

Thanks,
Wes
 

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The engine should have come from the factory without sleeves, unless there was some issue with it in which case it could have been bored and sleeved rather than scrapping the engine on the assembly line. There are sleeves available for rebuilding the engines and there are a couple of types available these days, thick and thin walled sleeves. The thick walled sleeves are generally what a machine shop prefers, as they bore a slightly larger hole in the block, insert the sleeve and then bore the sleeve out to the desired size. Thin wall sleeves require a much more exacting bore of the block to fit the sleeve and then the sleeve itself can only be honed to finalize the inside of the bore, and the thin wall sleeves can be distorted out of shape by someone who doesn't know what they're doing or doesn't care.

A full engine rebuild, including sleeves, new pistons, rods, bearings, a valve job, etc. shouldn't cost more than a couple thousand dollars, so if the engine is the only thing wrong with it then it is still a good deal. You won't know the condition of the transmission or hydraulics until you get the engine running, so I can't say right now whether you got a good deal or not, but it is definitely not a boat anchor.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The engine should have come from the factory without sleeves, unless there was some issue with it in which case it could have been bored and sleeved rather than scrapping the engine on the assembly line. There are sleeves available for rebuilding the engines and there are a couple of types available these days, thick and thin walled sleeves. The thick walled sleeves are generally what a machine shop prefers, as they bore a slightly larger hole in the block, insert the sleeve and then bore the sleeve out to the desired size. Thin wall sleeves require a much more exacting bore of the block to fit the sleeve and then the sleeve itself can only be honed to finalize the inside of the bore, and the thin wall sleeves can be distorted out of shape by someone who doesn't know what they're doing or doesn't care.

A full engine rebuild, including sleeves, new pistons, rods, bearings, a valve job, etc. shouldn't cost more than a couple thousand dollars, so if the engine is the only thing wrong with it then it is still a good deal. You won't know the condition of the transmission or hydraulics until you get the engine running, so I can't say right now whether you got a good deal or not, but it is definitely not a boat anchor.
Awesome. Thats what my plan was to try and free up the pistons and just take it down to the machine shop and get them to clean and inspect the block for cracks and re sleeve.

Any suggestions on freeing up the pistons from the cylinder walls ?

Thanks
 

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Mix up a combination of ATF and acetone at a 50/50 ratio, add it to the cylinders and wait a day and try to turn the engine with a breaker bar on the crankshaft pulley or pull the starter and use a pry bar on the ring gear teeth to turn it. If the engine still won't move, top off the fluid in the cylinders and wait a day and try again. It should eventually free up over the next one to two weeks. If you have the head off you can try using a piece of hardwood as a driver and pound on it with a 2 lb. hammer on top of each piston repeatedly.
 

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Mix up a combination of ATF and acetone at a 50/50 ratio, add it to the cylinders and wait a day and try to turn the engine with a breaker bar on the crankshaft pulley or pull the starter and use a pry bar on the ring gear teeth to turn it. If the engine still won't move, top off the fluid in the cylinders and wait a day and try again. It should eventually free up over the next one to two weeks. If you have the head off you can try using a piece of hardwood as a driver and pound on it with a 2 lb. hammer on top of each piston repeatedly.
Crazy D Equipment has a video on YouTube showing freeing up a seized motor using Iodine. Don't know how that works, just does.
 

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That's interesting. TIncture of iodine is between 2% and 7% iodine and the majority is a mixture of water and ethanol. I would not want ot add water and ethanol to an engine that's rusted stuck. It would likely cause more rust.
 

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That's interesting. TIncture of iodine is between 2% and 7% iodine and the majority is a mixture of water and ethanol. I would not want ot add water and ethanol to an engine that's rusted stuck. It would likely cause more rust.
I agree with you. I have always used an ATF mixture and vibration to free up stuck parts. That was the first time I had ever heard of Iodine and I would be scared to try it. Just thought it was an interesting read. I prefer the ATF/acetone mix, but have also used ATF/WD-40 effectively when acetone can empty.
 
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