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Just some crazy cat...
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm kicking around ideas on how to develop my land. Right now I have nothing built there (except a solar powered weather station). It's 15 acres m/l with approximately 1.5 - 2 acres of woods with an intermittent stream and the rest is a hay field. I already have an entrance from the road installed and a land bridge / culvert over the stream. In the photo below the entrance is barely visible in the lower right corner of the property which is outlined in yellow.

It's going to be a few years before I build a house although I've shown the proposed location on the drawing in black. The purple is the proposed driveway. The light blue shows the proposed yard boundary. The red rectangle is a proposed 60x40 barn.

The road and house location are at about the same elevation. The area with the stream is lower of course. The house location is also the highest point of the field with the elevation tapering off to the north (North is up).

I think most people would probably put the house and other structures south of the stream. In fact, just a bit south of the stream is a good location for a house with a walkout basement and perhaps a bit more privacy due to the surrounding trees. I'd prefer to be a bit farther from the road.

The longest side of the property (north-south) is 1280 ft. The proposed driveway would end up being about that length. Yeah, a lot of snow plowing.

I'd like to build the barn first for tractor, mower, etc. storage. Plus it'd be handy to have when the house is built a few years down the road.

Any thoughts on this layout? It meets setback requirements for my county. And it should be possible to get a permit to build the barn first since it will be used to store equipment associated with the hay production, although I haven't yet filed for a permit.

A related question: I'd be nice to hold off on the cost (and maintenance) of the driveway for now until the house is built but I'm not sure how the contractors who build the barn would feel about that. Driving through the field is no problem in a truck, although the area near the stream has some grass-free spots and is best not used immediately after a rain. Is not having a driveway going to make it difficult to find a contractor willing to take on the job?

 

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Come contractors will refuse the job.. some will take it.. If one gets stuck you will be paying the tow bill..

As for that length of driveway.. it could be hella spendy to build it right..

Myself.. I would want the north wind protection of those trees.

I also like to know who is coming on my property.. House at the back does not allow for that.

If your going to cut and bale hay.. you will be wasting a bunch of it by putting your house at the back with that long driveway..

Expense of putting utilities in could also come into play.. Running power and anything else that far back.. gets expensive in a hurry..
 

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外人Geezer MTF Member
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What's that little white road to the left, JT? About where that second round dot is from the bottom looks like a good driveway entrance to me. And, like Team said, driveways can get expensive quick, plus the utilities being run so far.

You are doing good though, in thinking about elevation, i.e., drainage. Man, you wouldn't believe the problems I have seen because people built a building too low to the ground (not meaning basements). Keep 'er high and dry.
 

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Just some crazy cat...
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What's that little white road to the left, JT? About where that second round dot is from the bottom looks like a good driveway entrance to me."
That's the neighbor's driveway. Similar terrain, but somewhat shorter driveway since their house is slightly farther south and the road curves to the north a bit right there. Their house is just left of that middle dot.
 

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OK just a few things... Most have been listed all ready.. I do realy like the idea of being back far... but also its going to be a lot of extra cost as been listed. One thing to look into.... does you local codes allow any structures to be built infront of your house? Some areas dont.... and that will give you a ton of unuseable space. Now onto that stream.... does it flood? stagnet, with a lot of bugs? How about sepic system? How does the stream effect that? Guessing that you cant put the house just infront of the woods [ My first thought would be to pop it right before the woods right where the drive curves into the woods... there is a faint brown patch there.... ] but I bet sepic will be a issue... I would put it just past the woods and give that whole open area behind as open space.
 

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Driving through the field is no problem in a truck, although the area near the stream has some grass-free spots and is best not used immediately after a rain.
The problem won't be the contractors, it will be delivery trucks. You need to have a road that is heavy enough to get a semi through it. Not to mention equipment haulers for the site excavation.

Your culvert in the stream, how long is it? You need to have a road minimum 12' wide for trucks. If the road needs to be built higher over the culvert to match into the road on each side to alleviate any dip in the road over the stream, that is also a consideration. Material on the edge of the road will not stand up steeper than a 1:1 slope without a retaining wall. So if the road over the culvert gets built up 3' to match, it will be a minimum of 7' narrower than the culvert. 3' of slope each side, plus 6" of pipe left exposed each side. The dirt on the upstream side will have to be covered with fabric, or large rock so it doesn't wash out during a significant rain. I suggest fabric and rock.

For the drive, what is the soil type? Black dirt over clay? Or is the subsoil something different? Normally, black dirt should be removed before building up a drive. The organic compounds found in the topsoil are decaying, and will continue to do so. It will continue to settle, even if covered. If the topsoil layer is thick, it will get expensive fast to correct it. If the property has a sandy subsoil, that can be used to build up the driveway. But that requires some equipment to get it done. You mention building there could be years away. You could continue to chip away at a driveway as money permits during that time span.

As Gerald mentioned, check with the local utilities to get a rough estimate of the cost to run the power and other utilities back that far. And keep in mind they will bury it right next to your drive, and they have to maintain a minimum depth through the stream, over your culvert.

Also, you mention privacy. Now is the time to start any trees or privacy hedges you might want to add.

I'm not going to say that your house location is undo-able. Anything is possible, especially with a large budget. But if expense is an issue, moving closer to the road might be worth considering. The area just North of the trees, past the stream, would also be an option. It would shield you from the road, yet leave the field behind largely unmolested.
 

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Just some crazy cat...
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Your culvert in the stream, how long is it?
It's 60 feet long (30" diameter) with ~6 inches exposed on either side. I don't recall how high up it is from the stream, but a heck of a lot of dirt was brought in to build it up, in addition to some rock that was already on site. It's less than a 1:1 slope. It's actually in pretty good shape and has plenty of grass on it right now -- no bare soil or clay. The spot that may get a bit slippery when wet is the approach to the crossing from the south were some excavation was done when the crossing was put in.

For the drive, what is the soil type? Black dirt over clay? Or is the subsoil something different? Normally, black dirt should be removed before building up a drive...
That's good to know, thanks. There is a thick later of black dirt over clay, except as you get close to the stream at which point you hit rock.

Going through that rock is going to add cost to running utilities, too. I already have a water meter and one hydrant installed. The scar from that can be seen in the photo just to the left of the proposed driveway. The hydrant is at the tree just before the second bend in the driveway which is as far as the water line currently runs. It was sized large enough to be the main water line for a residence. That run was pretty clean with a few rocks being hit in the last 50 or so feet.
 
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