My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,362 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever filled a lawn roller with sand?.... any pro's and con's you'd like to share?... if sand is not good - what are other options?

I'm thinking of doing this in order to make the roller more effective...water is just not heavy enough for the relatively firm soil I have. It's "soil"... not sand or rock... but it's still hard - even after a rainfall....

cheers......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
How big is your roller? I suspect it's the size doesn't allow enough weight per sq. in. The other factor is timing...if one waits too long a steam roller won't do much good...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,307 Posts
My dad filled a lawn roller with Limestone, as he didn't want to have to fill and drain it every year. It's a little noisy, but it works. According to my pocket ref book, water is 62.4 lbs/cu ft. Limestone is about 97 lbs/cu ft. loose sand is about 90 lbs/cu ft. By those numbers, filling a roller with sand will give you almost half again as much weight, if filled fully. You could leave it slightly underfilled, if needed.

Before you do this, you better make sure you have enough tractive effort to pull the loaded roller. You also better make sure you have a good parking plan, as you will have that much more trouble shifting it to hitch it up. I know that wrestling my water filled roller is tough enough.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
I got my Agri-Fad plastic-drum roller cheap from work. It was a piece of rental equipment that developed a hole somewhere around the axle. I've only used it once, about half full, and it didn't leak half-full ofcourse.

I've considered recently, filling it with no-mix deck-post concrete, and adding water.
 

·
I Love All Color Tractors
Joined
·
22,321 Posts
The concrete would work pretty good as well. Just keep in mind that concrete weighs between 130 and 150 lbs/cu.ft. That is a lot of load to keep traction and also a lot of load on your transmission if you have hills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
so forget the concrete idea then.
 

·
USMC
Joined
·
19,146 Posts
I've got a 42" poly filled with sand and I don't know how much it weighs. slkpk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,362 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The roller is a 48" steel one.

The tractor is a 2305, so the roller weight and load is peanuts.

All I want is to be able to get smooth out the ruts my tractors put in the lawn in the spring..... so I would need pressure (weight / area) equivalent to that which my tractor exerts....

I think I'll go ahead and do it.

thanks!
 

·
I Love All Color Tractors
Joined
·
22,321 Posts
Since you posted this in the backyard, I though that you might be using a GT. A 2305 should have no problem with the roller filled with whatever you want. Go with the concrete if that is what you want. I wouldn't worry about the load on the machine at all since its a 2305.
 

·
Just passing through
Joined
·
8,419 Posts
Has anyone ever filled a lawn roller with sand?.... any pro's and con's you'd like to share?... if sand is not good - what are other options?

I'm thinking of doing this in order to make the roller more effective...water is just not heavy enough for the relatively firm soil I have. It's "soil"... not sand or rock... but it's still hard - even after a rainfall....

cheers......
Obviously it's not that firm...or you wouldn't be dealing with ruts your tractor made...:D

You have just experienced why farmers have a LAWN MOWER as well as our tractors...;)

Using water allows you to vary the weight you are applying, but in your case, I believe you may find that your tractor will exert more psi at its tire print than anything you put in the typical small lawn roller...:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,648 Posts
Concern........if you use sand, make sure that it is DRY sand. If you fill your roller completely, and the sand freezes, you might split the roller vessel. Also, wet sand doesn't pour out of the roller vessel as easy as it went in.
You could always mount a box on top of the roller to hold additional weight, similiarto the weight boxes used on lawn tractor pullen attachments.
 

·
I'll do that next.....
Joined
·
154 Posts
Wally2q,
Did you try the sand? I acquired a rusted out 36 x 24 yard roller a few years back and since it wouldn't hold liquid, I filled it with sand, to the top. I pulled it with my 91 Craftsman GT6000 and the only time I got in trouble was early in the spring when the ground was really soft.

Man would that thing flatten the ground! It finally rusted out and I got another roller (48 x 24) and I'm kind of afraid to fill it with sand since it's bigger and would weigh even more, but I might one of these days.

Let us know if you decide to try it.

Dave
 

·
Tech Nerd Tractor Convert
Joined
·
1,388 Posts
[...] in your case, I believe you may find that your tractor will exert more psi at its tire print than anything you put in the typical small lawn roller...:(
This sounds like a catch-22... but it must work, right? Or else people wouldn't roll in the first place... There must be some other mitigating factor at work, like maybe greater pressure doesn't necessarily move the earth proportionally more and even a lesser pressure roller following behind a tire still can reflatten the tire rut satisfactorily. Hmm.. this one's a bit of a puzzler.
 

·
Janitor at Large
Joined
·
5,620 Posts
One of the tractors I bought had sand in the tires....The guy told me it was a pulling tractor.....I took the sand out, but am considering trying some again.
 

·
Just passing through
Joined
·
8,419 Posts
This sounds like a catch-22... but it must work, right? Or else people wouldn't roll in the first place... There must be some other mitigating factor at work, like maybe greater pressure doesn't necessarily move the earth proportionally more and even a lesser pressure roller following behind a tire still can reflatten the tire rut satisfactorily. Hmm.. this one's a bit of a puzzler.
Actually...this is merely another example of the vehicle footprint exerting higher pounds per square inch not necessarily reflecting higher total weight...

You need to calculate the footprint of the tractor vs the footprint of the roller

The classic one was when the aisle of early airliners was being deformed...and then the engineers figured out that the psi exerted by the stiletto heels, (i.e. 1/4 sq in) of the flight attendants, with a weight of 110 lbs exerted a pressure of 440 psi which exceeded the psi of the large males, with a weight of 300 lbs spread over a heel of 2 sq in exerting a pressure of only 150 psi...;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Has anyone ever filled a lawn roller with sand?.... any pro's and con's you'd like to share?... if sand is not good - what are other options?

I'm thinking of doing this in order to make the roller more effective...water is just not heavy enough for the relatively firm soil I have. It's "soil"... not sand or rock... but it's still hard - even after a rainfall....

cheers......
I dug this old thread up while searching for filling lawn rollers. I am thinking of filling my roller with sand or concrete so I can use it in the winter to roll my gravel driveway to pack the snow so I can then use the blower after that. Wally, did you ever do this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
I have a poly roller, I think it handles ~ 350 + or so pounds with water. I recently put sand in it, along with water (mostly sand though). I'd say with the sand and water it weighs at least 600lbs and I would think more around 750?... maybe. The problem with adding sand is it's really hard to move it around and transport. For example, I have some family members that like to use it and taking it to their place used to be a breeze, now with the sand it's going to be difficult because of the weight.

If I were to do things differently, I'd go to Craiglist and buy a used steel 1000 lb + roller and keep my poly/water roller for easy travel or easy use.

In addition, it was a b|+[h getting the sand in there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
I have a 48" poly roller, filled with sand, have no issues moving it with my YTH2454. Also if I have to transport it, I just use a winch to put up on a trailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts
just my opinion but i don't think a roller is used for removing vehicle ruts, the best way is to add fill to the rut, or dig it up and regrade it.

clipped from a lawn & garden site.

When you should use a lawn roller
by Maddie Morgan
Keeping your lawn smooth and flat helps when trying to maintain a healthy well manicured yard. Lawn rollers are used to level ground for more precise mowing, as well as for packing down new sod and seeds. It is not essential to have your lawn rolled every year, unless there are noticeable bumps and depressions in the yard, or you are planning on adding new sod or reseeding the lawn.

When rolling to get rid of large bulges in the lawn, dig three inches around each bump and roll back the turf, precede to remove excess soil. Place turf back and use lawn roller to reestablish soil. Be sure to water the area thoroughly afterwards. You may also need to roll the lawn several times after watering the area in order to establish a flat service.

Leveling depressions in the soil is similar to getting rid of bulges, except that you need to add more soil under the turf instead of removing it. Again, always water the disturbed turf thoroughly and then use your roller top create a smooth lawn. Continue to repeat watering and rolling until lawn is fully recovered and flat in appearance.

The use of a lawn roller is also helpful when sowing new grass seeds. Before spreading seeds, roll lawn and rake away dead grass helping the lawn to breathe. After you have sowed the seeds water thoroughly and then roll the lawn, which will help sin the germination process. Be sure to plant seeds during the beginning of the year and not during extreme weather conditions, when seeds will be less likely to grow properly.

When you are replacing sod it is vital to roll the area in order for the new grass to take root and integrate into the old soil. After laying the new sod roll immediately and then water thoroughly. It is also a good idea to repeat this process a week or two after sod has been laid down.

A good lawn roller can be expensive to buy, but if you only need it for a short period they can be rented rather cheaply at your local hardware store. You may also want to look around at garage sales and pick one up even if you don't think you will need it at the time. The health and appearance of your yard can benefit greatly from proper rolling procedures. Roll your way to a greener healthier lawn.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top