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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I am in the process of restoring a 1968 Power King. Ive finally entered the painting stage. I have decided to go with Rustoleum Restoration Series Allis-Charmers orange and won't be using a hardener. I have found Mark777's painting tips very informative and helpful and have a few questions.

1. What would the proper paint mix ratio be, how many parts paint to parts thinner/reducer?

2.Will Naphtha work chemically with Rustoleum as a thinner/reducer or should I use regular paint thinner?

3. Just wondering if anybody used Rustoleum and how they liked it?

I will be painting this with a suction/canister type gun and it will be in 70 degree weather with 55-70% humidity.

Thank you all for your help:thanku:
 

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Hi Redcap,

I'm glad you found the paint tips 'stickey' helpful.

With a siphon fed gun you may have to experiment with the paint reduction. It will probably be near 65%-70% thinner, but I would start at 60% and shoot a couple passes on a test panel.

Naphtha works excellent....in cooler temperatures because it evaporates quickly. And slower in cold weather, but still, quicker than thinner which helps prevent sags and runs. Using Naphtha above 72° causes the paint film to dry too fast and not allow the paint to flow out evenly. Often this also causes solvent pop and small fish-eyes so 'colder' is better' when using naphtha.

Rustoleum is top of the line, oil base industrial paint. Shooting it with a paint gun will be slow going. Take your time, have coffee and take long breaks between coats and you'll be fine. It WILL take several hours (OK, days) for the finish to cure to touch...and a month to fully cure.

Using an Acrylic hardener in your ratio paint mix drops the cure rate dramatically. Minutes instead of hours between coats, hours instead of days to dry to the touch, and a day or two to completely cure. It is, however, extremely hazardous to your health if you don't use proper respiratory protection and gloves, eye protection too.

Good luck and keep us updated OK?

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mark,

Thank you for your reply. After reading your answer and a few other posts I'm debating about the paint. After researching a little more about Rustoleum it seems there are a lot of complaints are of its slow cure rate, even with hardener. I've read some about Valspar Tractor and Implement finishes and other than fading a lot of people seem to like it. The impression I get is Valspar seems a little easier to work with. This will be the first time painting with a spray gun so in your opinion would Valspar be easier to work with than the Rustoleum? Also hows the durability with Valspar? :thanku:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
One More thing I was wondering, Is there any difference between Valspars Tractor and Implement paint and Valspar Restoration Series?
 

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One More thing I was wondering, Is there any difference between Valspars Tractor and Implement paint and Valspar Restoration Series?
I was provided an opportunity to use and then critique' the product - Valspar Restoration Series paint. Here is a link that you may find interesting: http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=12203&highlight=Valspar+Restoration+Series+paint

As you can see this link is from late 2005...and I have used it quite extensively since then. I would say the difference is substantial in the paint content. The RS Series is heavier, which means more titanium and talc in the base. This qualifies it as a 'High Solids' enamel....comparable to automotive finishes. So, simple answer is Yes...it's better than the tractor and implement Valspar sells.

Mark
 

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Mark,

Thank you for your reply. After reading your answer and a few other posts I'm debating about the paint. After researching a little more about Rustoleum it seems there are a lot of complaints are of its slow cure rate, even with hardener. I've read some about Valspar Tractor and Implement finishes and other than fading a lot of people seem to like it. The impression I get is Valspar seems a little easier to work with. This will be the first time painting with a spray gun so in your opinion would Valspar be easier to work with than the Rustoleum? Also hows the durability with Valspar? :thanku:

No...not really, I wouldn't say one versus the other is easier. We just have several painters that use the Valspar because their lineup caters to tractor paint codes. The difference between the two paint brands is Valspar uses a synthetic oil base and Rustoleum uses raw fish oil. Both are compatible to high end catalysts (hardeners). True Value and Ace Hardware also have their own in house brand of oil base paint as well. They work identical to the Valspar. I suspect they are made for, and sold to each hardware store but probably come from the same paint manufacturer...

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mark,

Thanks for all the info, I found the link pretty interesting. I decided to go with the Valspar went to TSC this weekend picked up a quart and some naphtha, I didn't get any hardener just because of the heath risks and I don't have a full face air supplied resperator( I just have a half face NORTH resperator)Ill have to deal with a longer dry time. Ill keep ya posted and post some pics of the tractor once its painted.

Once again thanks:thThumbsU
 

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Mark,

Also hows the durability with Valspar? :thanku:

Sorry,

I, somehow, missed the last question.

Durability of Valspar, and most other enamel base paints is only as good as your preparation. If the substrate (primer or painted surfaces) are well scuffed and clean of all debris and trace solvents the paint is extremely durable. If your mixing ratios of thinner, hardener and paint are right on, the paint can withstand light impacts and pressure washing. If you use too much hardener it will most certainly dry faster but, the paint will become brittle and prone to chipping.

Mark
 

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Durability of Valspar, and most other enamel base paints is only as good as your preparation. If the substrate (primer or painted surfaces) are well scuffed and clean of all debris and trace solvents the paint is extremely durable. If your mixing ratios of thinner, hardener and paint are right on, the paint can withstand light impacts and pressure washing. If you use too much hardener it will most certainly dry faster but, the paint will become brittle and prone to chipping.
That kinda sounds like a politician's answer ;). I assume that you've been pleased with the results.

I hear complaints about fading with Restoration Series. I understand that with no clear coat it's going to fade in the sun, but would you say that it's generally not an issue or ?
 

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It fades badly.

How's that for a brutally honest, non-politically and unbiased answer?? :biglaugh:

Valspar's Restoration Series paint fades a little slower but it still doesn't have the necessary ultra violet screeners to stop it. Valspar's own chemists can't recommend a clear coat that they manufacture, nor a compatible clear that works with their system of oil base paints. And I Know they can do this...but most probably don't because it would compete with their high end automotive finish industry. One has to remember that they own and manufacture "House of Kolor" custom paints, pearls and candies...along with their Plasti-Kote, De Beer's and "Z-Base" binders.
 
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