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So I finally put the rotary plow on the C8. Though I don't have it adjusted perfectly, pulls slight left, it does move some dirt. I needed to plant some comfrey for the Mrs., And I didn't want to dig by hand again. So I didn't, the rotary plow did. In one pass I made a trench about 8" deep 32' long at idle. Low/low, and it piled the clay/loam on the right hand edge of the trench. Where have these things been all of my life? This gravely guy was a genius.

I do have one question though, with the plow at it's highest setting, lowest hole in the shaft, the plow hits the gearbox tubes. I put a bearing collar on the shaft to prevent it, but that can't be right. While I did disassemble it, I put it back together exactly the way it was. Minus the too long bolts. Any ideas, or do I need to look at the ipl and !ake sure it is right?

Thanks again,
You people are great...
 

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Slide the bracket holding the guide wheels down a bit. That picks up the gearbox, so you can drop the blade assembly down without trying to dig a deep trench.

Agreed that the rotary plow is another hugely useful attachment. It's a simple, unique design, which really works.

These machines are good for a niche which isn't that common any more, but I think was prevalent in the 30s and 40s: The family which isn't running a full-scale large farm, but still needs power equipment enough to manage a small agricultural operation on their land. The rotary plow is an example: You'd never use it for turning over your 10 acre cornfield, but for a medium-large garden, where you're not interested in all that hand work, it does a great job.
 

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Speaking of rotary plows, I want to run a power line from my house to the shed. How deep will the plow cut a trench in one pass? I understand soil conditions matter, but don't think my ground is that hard. Would the plow work? I had one guy tell me he used a rototiller with one set of tines. There is no codes I need to follow, but I would like to bury the wire as deep as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Speaking of rotary plows, I want to run a power line from my house to the shed. How deep will the plow cut a trench in one pass? I understand soil conditions matter, but don't think my ground is that hard. Would the plow work? I had one guy tell me he used a rototiller with one set of tines. There is no codes I need to follow, but I would like to bury the wire as deep as possible.
Does it freeze where you are? I wouldn't bury a type uf wire less then 12", I don't think you could go that deep even in multiple passes. Code is 24" or 18" with concrete over it. Be careful.
 

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Speaking of rotary plows, I want to run a power line from my house to the shed. How deep will the plow cut a trench in one pass? I understand soil conditions matter, but don't think my ground is that hard. Would the plow work? I had one guy tell me he used a rototiller with one set of tines. There is no codes I need to follow, but I would like to bury the wire as deep as possible.
Been there done that; rent a Ditch Witch. It'll cut a nice drainage ditch though, but it's not good for trenching. I tried using mine for the same thing, but it was a huge hassle. Digging by hand wound up being faster/easier.
 

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I have done it with the plow. I made two passes lowering the shaft on the plow for the second pass. The ditch ends up being a little shallow, but was good enough for what I was doing. I don't see why you could not buy a longer piece of hex, and keep lowering it and lowering it to get the depth you want. I am sure there is some sort of limitation, it may not throw the dirt out of the ditch, but at least it would loosen it up so you could shovel it out.

Gravely also made a different plow head with a long hex shaft to dig holes didn't they?

I don't know what size the hex shaft is, but here is a link where you can buy some.

https://www.mcmaster.com/hex-shafts
 

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Yes. Gravely made what they called the planter drill, for making holes for saplings. A rotary plow head on a shaft about 30" long. I made my own with a chunk of hex stock.

I don't think it would work very well for trenching, as there's no way to get the loose dirt up and out. Even when punching holes for trees, you have that problem once you're down a foot or so.

What you really want is the gravely trencher attachment.


Rare and expensive :(
 

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Wow! Never seen that attachment before. I guess it would be a good day to use it, and still have four limbs, ten fingers and ten toes. Did Gravely make a stump grinder?
 

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Yes. Gravely made what they called the planter drill, for making holes for saplings. A rotary plow head on a shaft about 30" long. I made my own with a chunk of hex stock.

I don't think it would work very well for trenching, as there's no way to get the loose dirt up and out. Even when punching holes for trees, you have that problem once you're down a foot or so.

What you really want is the gravely trencher attachment.


Rare and expensive <img src="http://www.mytractorforum.com/images/smilies/frown.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Frown" class="inlineimg" />
Gravely didn't make that. Back in the 70's a couple other companies made implements that worked on gravely tractors. If you look closely it is powered by a rotary plow gearbox the same company made a stump grinder it is run off a bushhog gearbox. I saw one tonight. There was a mountaineer tractor built by former gravely employees that implements are interchangeable and even a backhoe attachment. Gravely dealers sold the third party attachments
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I put a pipe coupler on the hex shaft on mine. To keep plow from hitting bottom casting.
So it is normal for the plow to be able to hit the casing? At least I don't have to look at it any further. Thanks for the confirmation.
 

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There was a mountaineer tractor built by former gravely employees that implements are interchangeable
I have a mountaineer 88E. It's clearly the next generation of gravely thinking. The transmission has been rethought so you don't need to make as many tradeoffs between tractor speed and attachment speed. If anything, it's even more overbuilt than a gravely!

I wish I could find more of them, but they're awfully scarce. I don't know the production numbers, but it can't have been high. Even here in new england, where it's been said that gravely L models litter the streets, I've only seen 2 or 3 mountaineers come up for sale.

You can see a "race" between my mountaineer in low/low/low and one of my gravely LS's with GRWs in low :)

https://www.mytractorforum.com/24-gravely/876425-great-race.html
 

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Slide the bracket holding the guide wheels down a bit. That picks up the gearbox, so you can drop the blade assembly down without trying to dig a deep trench.

Agreed that the rotary plow is another hugely useful attachment. It's a simple, unique design, which really works.

These machines are good for a niche which isn't that common any more, but I think was prevalent in the 30s and 40s: The family which isn't running a full-scale large farm, but still needs power equipment enough to manage a small agricultural operation on their land. The rotary plow is an example: You'd never use it for turning over your 10 acre cornfield, but for a medium-large garden, where you're not interested in all that hand work, it does a great job.
Ive got the single blade type with the steel wheels that weighs a good hernia when I move it, I plan on cleaning it up one day. Got it with the LI and a sickle (sp?) also, it weighs a ton to.
 

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I haven't read or posted here in an age and find this thread waiting for me. Was just thinking about my rotary plow today - because I haven't used it in forever and enjoy watching it work. I only have a 4-wheel ride-on tractor. If I had a walk-behind I'd keep the plow mounted on it.

I also got a long piece of hex stock a few years ago to make a shrub planter or a post hole digger. Worked better for shrubs but you have to shovel the dirt out by hand once get a foot or so deep. I found in the Georgia clay that it didn't pull itself down very far either. We banged on the top of the shaft with a sledge to get it to bite. Still more fun than digging by hand!

But totally my favorite thing for garden prep or row making.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I haven't read or posted here in an age and find this thread waiting for me. Was just thinking about my rotary plow today - because I haven't used it in forever and enjoy watching it work. I only have a 4-wheel ride-on tractor. If I had a walk-behind I'd keep the plow mounted on it.

I also got a long piece of hex stock a few years ago to make a shrub planter or a post hole digger. Worked better for shrubs but you have to shovel the dirt out by hand once get a foot or so deep. I found in the Georgia clay that it didn't pull itself down very far either. We banged on the top of the shaft with a sledge to get it to bite. Still more fun than digging by hand!

But totally my favorite thing for garden prep or row making.
Where did you get the hex stock? I would love to get a planter head, but the plow hex is too short to dig deep enough. I would like to find some around 4-5' long. I guess I should measure it so I know what size to look for.
 

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Where did you get the hex stock? I would love to get a planter head, but the plow hex is too short to dig deep enough. I would like to find some around 4-5' long. I guess I should measure it so I know what size to look for.
https://www.onlinemetals.com/en/buy/cold-roll/1-25-cold-roll-hex-bar-12l14-cold-drawn/pid/19779

I bought a 3' length of this material and bored holes in it for the head and depth-stop holes.

It works fairly well, but as noted, you need to pull the loose dirt out by hand once you get down a ways.
 

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But totally my favorite thing for garden prep or row making.
They look crude and straight-forward but thats all something needs to be to work, Oh and its heavy as heck to lol.

Ive never used one like that and when I got it we was getting it out of my truck and I said " lets get rid of this anchor" and my son said " no I want it" so I kept it. Glad I did.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Where did you get the hex stock? I would love to get a planter head, but the plow hex is too short to dig deep enough. I would like to find some around 4-5' long. I guess I should measure it so I know what size to look for.
https://www.onlinemetals.com/en/buy/cold-roll/1-25-cold-roll-hex-bar-12l14-cold-drawn/pid/19779

I bought a 3' length of this material and bored holes in it for the head and depth-stop holes.

It works fairly well, but as noted, you need to pull the loose dirt out by hand once you get down a ways.
Thank you for that. I will check them out. Did you use the plow head or did you find a planting head?
 

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There was a mountaineer tractor built by former gravely employees that implements are interchangeable
I have a mountaineer 88E. It's clearly the next generation of gravely thinking. The transmission has been rethought so you don't need to make as many tradeoffs between tractor speed and attachment speed. If anything, it's even more overbuilt than a gravely!

I wish I could find more of them, but they're awfully scarce. I don't know the production numbers, but it can't have been high. Even here in new england, where it's been said that gravely L models litter the streets, I've only seen 2 or 3 mountaineers come up for sale.

You can see a "race" between my mountaineer in low/low/low and one of my gravely LS's with GRWs in low <img src="http://www.mytractorforum.com/images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" />

https://www.mytractorforum.com/24-gravely/876425-great-race.html
I think I read some where that production numbers for mountaineer brand machines is around 1100 but don't hold me to it .
I have a Zanon 28 inch mower deck for my Grillo G85D that Joel from Earthtools BCS tells me that he imported 10 of.
 
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