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Citizen of Earth
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been scrounging materials for a couple of years for a "free" shed. I originally was going to use plywood and asphault shingles for the roof, but those are hard to find free, and plywood prices have skyrocketed. So I've been considering a metal roof. I can scrounge the material for the framing, but I have no experience with metal roofing. What is a good choice to use and how do I fasten it down? Can I mix metal and fiberglass panels to allow in light? And how well does this type of roof do in snow country? We get a typical snow storm dumping 6"-12" 5 or more times a winter with the occassional 12"-24" storm and the rare 24"-36" monster storm that occurs every 5 or 10 years. Plus we get the occassional 40-50 MPH wind thunderstorms in the summer. Any suggestions are welcome!
 

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Member Extraordinaire - Deceased March 2017
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bontai Joe said:
I've been scrounging materials for a couple of years for a "free" shed. I originally was going to use plywood and asphault shingles for the roof, but those are hard to find free, and plywood prices have skyrocketed. So I've been considering a metal roof. I can scrounge the material for the framing, but I have no experience with metal roofing. What is a good choice to use and how do I fasten it down? Can I mix metal and fiberglass panels to allow in light? And how well does this type of roof do in snow country? We get a typical snow storm dumping 6"-12" 5 or more times a winter with the occassional 12"-24" storm and the rare 24"-36" monster storm that occurs every 5 or 10 years. Plus we get the occassional 40-50 MPH wind thunderstorms in the summer. Any suggestions are welcome!
I would make sure that i used the screws with the rubber washers on them. Nails have a way of backing out and leaking. :dogrun:

Durwood
 

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Durwood is dead on in regards to using the screws with washers and not nails. Screws are the only way to go.

Sure you can mix fiberglass panels with metal panels to allow for light transmission. Its done on commercial buildings all the time. I have some on my foundry shed as well.........Only problem is here in the hot south the fiberglass seems to get its goody cooked out in the sun so they get weathered pretty bad in a short time, but mine has been on over 18 years and still leave light through and do not leak....In additon to who far apart you place your furring strips, or "strapping" as Norm Abrhams calls it, or Purlons if it was steel,or lathe if it was a slate or cedar shingle roof, the roof rafters spacing and pitch are also important. I see the images above show the rafters running at a 90 to the panels, but you can also run them the same direction as the rafters, if you use furring strips. Using furring strips will put more of a load across more than one rafter at a time without putting as much stress on the fasteners used to secure the metal panels. and it also helps in makeing the overal roof / structure more ridgid as winds etc will not work against the fasteners in the metal, as the furring strips is sort of like roof sheathing in regards to adding ridgidity.
 

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Crazy about Green and Red
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65 Posts
I live in Western Kentucky. I just put a new metal roof on my block building. Where I play with my tractors. I am having trouble with the metal roof leaking. I don't think I got the pitch of the roof high enough. I put tar paper down and then the metal roof. Then I used the special screws with the rubber gasket and the darn thing is still leaking. I am going to put a seal type paint on the roof when it dries up some. This paint has some texture to it. I would say a metal roof is good just make sure you have good pitch.

Tau
 

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Anything With Wheels
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Metal roofs are very popular in snow country. You can have a couple of feet build up on it and the first sunny day it releases. Just be careful what you place under the eaves. :)
 

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Argee said:
Metal roofs are very popular in snow country. You can have a couple of feet build up on it and the first sunny day it releases. Just be careful what you place under the eaves. :)
That's for sure! At the Conoco station in town they have a metal roof with a very steep pitch and it's always a hoot to watch customers play Russian (rushin'?) roulette trying to get in and out of the doors without getting dumped on!
 

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Citizen of Earth
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the tips guys! I've got just about everything I need except the roof, and a metal roof is gonna be a lot cheaper than a shingled plywood roof. I hope to get it done this spring/summer. Gonna need the loving wife's help, and I don't know how good her carpentry skills are, could be quite an adventure! :00000060:
 

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Anything With Wheels
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When you get ready to do it Joe, get in touch and I'll walk you through the construction process :fing32:
 

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Bontani, I am seeing more and more metal roofs here in Western N.Y. especially out in the country and on buisness in the city area. I notice they add little clips that retain the snow from falling down in sheets.
My son just had an archtechtural type metal roof put on his house out in the country and it looks great. He had it done though and it was expensive but will outlast regular shingles by a long way. I am certain that metal is the way to go. Keep asking questions and if you want do a google search, I think you will be surprised at the volume of information out there. When we had that monster snow fall a few yrs. ago I had 2 friends with collapsed garage roofs from the weight of the snow. Metal is lighter and the snow tends to slide off as the other poster said, unless you put the clips on.

Mike
 
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