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Discussion Starter #1
It is hard to keep the grill at 275* when there is a breeze, which means setting the two outside burners all the way down and they usually get blown out. I have tried a wind break with some success. This time I rolled the grill into the shop. The only down side was my stomach growling because of the smell.
Ribs turned out great! and the grill stayed right at 275 and didn't go out once.
 

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The problem overall is that the mass produced grills leave quite a bit to be desired as far as quality. Just from looking at the first picture of what I assume is a Coleman propane grill, you have large gaps where the hood meets the edge which allows wind to blow right through. Any metal to metal joining should have a high temp RTV sealant (red or copper) along with the nuts & screws to hold it together. Along the edge of the hood, a gasket would help immensely.
Even with my Oklahoma Joe's Highland offset smoker, I had to do quite a bit to seal it all up which made it work much, much better. Take a look at this website (there are others) where you can get all kinds of things to make your grilling & smoking experience that much more repeatable and easier.

 

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Do whatever works, I'd be fine with a grill in my garage. I could tinker about, while going low and slow.

In fact a have a Kamado BBQ in the garage. I have to roll out to use, as wife thinks its a fire hazard. Somehow welding and open flame torches are OK; I don't want to tell her they're worse.
 

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I worry about the wisdom of putting a lit grill in the garage,even with the door open. Disregarding the fire risk, CO build up can occur pretty easily.
 

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I worry about the wisdom of putting a lit grill in the garage,even with the door open. Disregarding the fire risk, CO build up can occur pretty easily.
The risk of fire is nothing compared to the risk of getting overcome by the CO gas...I am pretty sure that if you read the instructions that came with it ...it specifically advises against using indoors...garage door open...is not an "open area"
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The ribs came out great! I didn't need to keep re-lighting the grill. As for running the grill in the shop, this is only needed when as stated above "I need low and slow". Not sure what the difference is with running a propane heater with the doors closed, or the grill with doors open vOv . The grill has a large opening to allow venting if it goes out and you hit the lighter, prevents blowing the hood open, but also causes the problem of needing to re light often.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
1. Why do they sell them?
2. Would Wood or coal be better? I think not in Central TX.
3. Electric Furnace would require a major electrical upgrade.
4. Been using Propane in the shop for over 5 years and even camped out over night many times over night in here.
5. No I didn't read the link as we have been over this many times.
6. There is a 1" gap over the roll up door, and two window A/C provide ventilation (ie drafty).
7. Running a tractor, or brazing with the doors open set off the smoke detector quickly.
8. Grill or heater has not.
9. I'm still alive!
10. I'll get a CO2 detector if that will make every one happy.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok, I read the link. My heater is rated for in-doors but recommends a window be opened 1/2" The roll up door covers that. Never have had an issue. Back to the grill. Defiantly not in door safe, but it was set just inside the roll up door with the walk in door open just to shield the wind. no issues were noted other than a good aroma from the ribs.
 

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I doubt it will.
We have a propane kitchen stove with gas polits and no vents to the outside. Its been here for 28 years and no ones died yet on count of it. Unless your shop is darn small I think your save as long as no food catches on fire.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks, shop is 24 X 18 and if the food / grease catches fire on the grill, I just push the grill out side. Brazing and welding seems more dangerous in here. I prefer to do those outside.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
garage door open...is not an "open area" In my neck of the woods it is. Wind can be a constant 15 - 20 mph in this area (been thinking on a wind mill generator) With the doors open they have to be blocked or they slam shut.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the thoughts! I do my best to stay safe and comfortable. I wont mention how to disable the safties on these but that was mentioned previously in this thread.
 

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I suppose all you worriers have your gas stoves/ovens outside too... jeez.

What Larry is doing is perfectly safe.

Except for real ribs needing smoke... ;) but in a pinch I'll do 'em in the gas oven too, and they come out real nice.

🍻
 
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