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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm at 45 hours on the BX1860 and will be doing the 50 hour maintanence thing myself.

One question I have do you have to purge the air out of the fuel lines after replacing the fuel filters or will the system self purge?

30 years ago I had a kubota and the dealer warned about getting air in the fuel lines, back then he said you had to purge the system if you got air in it. I never got air in the lines, so never found out what happed if you did.
 

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One of the very nice things about our BX's is that that have a self bleeding fuel system feature due to the electric fuel pump. Changing out the fuel filters on a BX is actually quite simple.
1) clamp the rubber fuel line w/a pair of vise grips (or something similar) about 4 or so inches before the 1st fuel filter. This should cut off the fuel flow.

2) Kubota uses the squeeze type clamps so you'll need a pair of channel locks (or similar) to be able to squeeze them open enough to slip up on the fuel line away from the filter.

3) remove the filter. Be advised both filters are clamped in a bracket and once removed from the bracket may take some twisting and pulling to get the line off and theres an ounce or 2 of fuel in the filters also.
I recommend to replace those old squeeze type clamps w/new screw types. Theres been some reports where the older clamps did cvlamp as tight and the engine was able to suck air which caused performance issues. I purchased a pack of 4 or 5 for a couple $$$'s at an auto parts store.

4) Once both filters are replaced, secured in the brackets and clamped on the fuel lines, just turn the key to "on" and let it click away for 15 - 20 secs then try to start it. It should start right up.
The clicking you hear is actually the electric fuel pump working, and in that 15 - 20 secs you let it run, it is self bleeding the system enough to start and run. Any remaining air in the system is quickly bled through the injectors into the cylinder and becomes part of the combustion process.
It definitely beats the manual way of bleeding which is usually required for gravity feed / mechanical type fuel pumps :D

I just changed mine out for the very 1st time on my 500 hr service just a couple weeks ago and once you factor in removal/reinstall of the bonnet and MMM you'll probably have an hr or so in it. And since you'll have those off and will be in the area, a quick inspection wouldn't hurt either.
Good luck
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dave, Thanks for the thorough response, good idea on replacing the clamps I'll do that. Yea, when i have the bonnet off I'll be able to check inspect the rest of the engine. I have a grill gard so haven't taken off the bonnet to have a close look at the engine yet other than what i can see with the hood open. So far this tractor has been flawless, so not expecting any problems.
 
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