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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all, i have an ariens 8hp snow thrower with engine problems,
where can i find a decent replacement that will not break the bank.
it has the hmsk80 tecumseh on it now. and i hear they are hard to get parts
for? it is an 1998 yr engine. got a quote for 525.00 for a new tecumseh installed good price?
 

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It doesn't sound like a terribly good price to me, but I suppose it depends on whether you can install it yourself or not. No idea what shops charge for the labor aspect.

I bought a used HMSK80 for $150, and it came with a free Ariens ST824 snowblower attached :) Paying over 3x that for just an engine doesn't sound very good to me. You can buy a whole different used Ariens snowblower around here for less than $525. Then you'd have an engine as well as a second machine.

There seem to be a lot of machines that use those engines. Be aware that some HMSK80's have a second output shaft, to run another belt. So you'd want to be sure of which version you need (just a crankshaft output, or crankshaft and this second shaft).

If you were interested in using a different, new, engine, there are a lot of Chinese clones which could be options. But that will be more of an undertaking, quite a bit more involved than simply swapping for an identical engine (making sure the engines interface the same way, maybe rerouting controls, etc).

What's wrong with your engine?
 

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Ok, so what is the Shaft size, and mounting bolt spacing? Harbor freight sells some very high quality and very inexpensive motors that are direct replacements for most single shaft motors. Mounting bolts and shaft sizes are pretty much standardized today and not brand specific. If the shaft size is different you may just need to buy a new pulley keeping the same O.D. with a different shaft size. 3,600 rpm's is also pretty standard on all of these motors so there should be no issues there either.

To touch the sensitive issue of buying Chinese, You can not buy a new motor in that size anymore that is made in America. HF sells clones of Honda so you are supporting the theft of a design that Honda paid to develop. A modern Briggs, while made in china is at least a Briggs design. Also at least twice the price of HF. New Honda is the most expensive option, but also the best built motor (HF best built for the price).
 

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the PO hasnt yet answered "what kind of engine problems" I have had so many ieces of equip with "problems" that I have gotten cheap and fixed easily.. he may be able to do the same.

and I for one am going to avoid buying Chinese engines as long as possible by finding used Briggs and Tecumsehs and fixing/rebuilding them til I can't any longer; though I have read some stories of the clones being "OK" the idea of "clone" +Chinese =at least as hard to get parts for as the oldies if not harder, and most certianly a throw a way for thr simplest of issues.
 

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Jack of All Trades
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the idea of "clone" +Chinese =at least as hard to get parts for as the oldies if not harder, and most certianly a throw a way for thr simplest of issues.
Generally, the clones will use Honda parts just fine for most cases. I don't like seeing my $$$ go overseas, but unfortunately sometimes it is a matter of economics.
 

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Generally, the clones will use Honda parts just fine for most cases. I don't like seeing my $$$ go overseas, but unfortunately sometimes it is a matter of economics.
I apologize for bringing up the Chinese engine debate. I agree that keeping the old iron going is the best way. And yes, these motors are called clones because the Honda parts are interchangeable. Parts should not be the problem with these engines.

That said, to the original poster...

There are already a bunch of people here ready and willing to help you. If you have already replaced your motor let us know. It's good etiquette on forums to report the outcome of your problem instead of leaving it up in the air.

If not, post a picture or more info about the problem with the original motor and I'm pretty sure you will get a ton of help. Repairing small engines is something we do because we for some sick reason enjoy it. I think I get more satisfaction from taking a non functioning piece of equipment and fixing it than I do from actually using it. As a matter of fact, sometimes after I fix something I have to sell it because it has no value to me when running. I only value some things broken so that I can fix them.
 

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There are already a bunch of people here ready and willing to help you. If you have already replaced your motor let us know. It's good etiquette on forums to report the outcome of your problem instead of leaving it up in the air.

If not, post a picture or more info about the problem with the original motor and I'm pretty sure you will get a ton of help. Repairing small engines is something we do because we for some sick reason enjoy it. I think I get more satisfaction from taking a non functioning piece of equipment and fixing it than I do from actually using it. As a matter of fact, sometimes after I fix something I have to sell it because it has no value to me when running. I only value some things broken so that I can fix them.
:ditto::ditto:
 

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Repairing small engines is something we do because we for some sick reason enjoy it. I think I get more satisfaction from taking a non functioning piece of equipment and fixing it than I do from actually using it.
I'm certainly no expert, and I have way less experience than many of the people here. But there is something really fun and rewarding in taking a machine that didn't run, and getting it to fire up. I got a free snowthrower that had an extremely gunked-up carb, was just full of assorted junk (I think some of the stuff was gas-degraded silicone that the previous owner had apparently used to help seal where the bowl mounts).

It took me a while to clean up (it was my first carb rebuild), but when I put it back together, and it started on the first pull, I was thrilled :thThumbsU Same with getting my used generator running, and the weedwhacker, and the chainsaw... It's a great feeling when it works out.
 

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Totally agree with that. It's a thrill for me to try and diagnose a problem and the cause and then repair the damage. I almost feel sad once I've gotten it working to original spec because then its boring and just works as it should. Then I just use the equipment instead of try to repair it lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
sorry for the delayon my responce. was in st louis fri-sun.
used machine this am, did fine in snow that was not wet. but at the bottom of drive it bogged down, but engine seemed fine ,belt?the shop that looked at it said it might be the valves,and he was reluctant to pull it apart for ability
to obtain parts (1998 engine) he started it at shop and it would not stay running at low throttle( said thats why he thought valves) after use today
went to reduce rpms by using throttle it barely went down in rpms, any thoughts?
 

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If it won't slow down much, can you tell if it's running at the proper speed, when the throttle is up? In other words, is the problem that it won't speed up, or it won't slow down? :) You might be able to find a YouTube video of someone blowing with an older Ariens, to get a feel for what it should sound like, worst case. Presumably, like you said, it runs properly at full throttle, and just won't slow down. Hopefully the shop would have mentioned something if it would not speed up beyond idle or something.

I have a Tecumseh that's a few years older than yours. I did actually check the valves a few years ago, and found that one valve had less clearance than it was supposed to. I took it out, and we machined a few thousandths of an inch of its length. Reassembled and it had better clearance, and more compression while pull-starting (the valve wasn't being held open as far by the compression release). I want to say it had a bit more power afterwards, but that could have been my imagination.

Checking the valves was not hard. There's a cover on the side of the engine which exposes the valves. You just need a set of feeler gauges (inexpensive at an auto parts store, etc). To adjust them, on the other hand, is a fair bit more work. But checking them might show them to be fine.

I would consider that you might have a carburetor/throttle issue. There's a big cover on the left-hand side of the engine that covers the carburetor and throttle linkage. You could pull that off and see if the throttle and governor are moving smoothly, to make sure nothing is binding up.

If it's not revving up to the proper speed, and it's just an adjustment problem, there's a little screw that's visible if you raise the throttle lever. You can use that to adjust the full-throttle speed. There is also a screw under the cover to adjust the idle speed. But I wouldn't start messing with those just yet, if it were me.

There are a lot of knowledgeable and helpful people on here that can help you out.
 

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yeah if it runs that is 9/10 of the issue and almost certain proof that you dont need an engine replacement. Does it smoke?? I'd bet its just a carb or maybe governor linkage issue. I would not replace the engine just for that; are their adjustments on that carb?
 

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the HM Series Tecumseh goes way back into the 70s; is it popping/backfiring? It would not run well IF AT ALL if it had a bad exh valve. If you know anyone with a valve grinder (even local auto machine shop) if that is true that isnt an expensive fix even if you do hafta replace the valve. You shoutd be able to regrind that one and lap it in, then grind the stem to get the stem clearance back; unless the seat is loonse;
what are ya talking about, 1998 is not an old engine at all!!!! I have many 60s-70s ones that are still going strong.
 

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Whats the serial number of your engine?

Also, small engine repair shops have got to pay there bills. Sometimes a quote for repair will be enough that it's cheaper to buy a replacement motor even though the original motor is otherwise in good shape. If you can do the job yourself it's rarely a cheaper alternative to buy a whole new motor.

I did have a repair recently however where i decided to replace the motor rather than repair. It was an old 6 horse Tecumseh that shattered the rod. If only the rod needed replacement I could have done the job for $30-50. Unfortunately the crankshaft was scored badly where the rod attaches and that was something like $120 for the part alone. So instead of spending over $150, I purchased a 6.5 hp clone for $103+tax.

Sometimes there is enough carbon buildup on the valves to keep them from seating properly. It's not out of the realm of possibility that you just need a rotary tool with a scotch brite pad to have the motor running like new. If your going to replace the motor anyways than you really have nothing to lose by removing the head and having a look. Especially if it's a flathead.
 

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Before you spend a lot of $$, get some Marvel oil in a squirt bottle. Wind it up to full throttle and feed a heavy dose of Marvel in the intake. It will smoke a lot, so do this outdoors. It might be just a sticking valve and the Marvel will usually break it loose so it will fully seat.
Mike
 
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