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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few weeks ago, I started researching the parts necessary to add a remote oil filter to an Ingersoll 6018 w/ Onan P218. By researching the forums (here, the yahoo CGT, and posting a question on the Onan Engine Club) I found a lot of useful info.

After looking around at all the options, it appears that the most difficult (and expensive) part of the process is tracking down the Onan remote assembly for the engine.

While looking around, I found a seller on eBay that has several NOS Onan adapter assemblies (Onan part 122-0473). It is the complete adapter with all the oil bypass parts. I found the 122-0473 in the B43M manual. It is not listed in the B48 and P218 parts manuals I have; however, by looking at the components that make up the assembly, the individual parts appear to be the same for these engines as well. I emailed Brian Hilbreth and he said the 122-0473 part number is no longer current (the newer part number for the assembly is 122-0691).

For those interested, the price is $29 (for 2 units!) and the item number is 7623136485.

Dan
 

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I thought all P218 engines came stock with an oil filter so I'm curious why you would be wanting to install a remote filter?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I thought all P218 engines came stock with an oil filter so I'm curious why you would be wanting to install a remote filter?
Well, depending on your point of view, there may be several benefits. Unfortunately, some of the “advantages” may be subjective and difficult to quantify. I will present my rationale for considering this project.

This spring, I purchased a 1991 Ingersoll 6018 with a P218G Onan. The tractor and engine are original (135 hours total when I picked it up). Came with a splitter, 3pt finish mower, and tiller. Plan on keeping it a long, long time.

It is used to maintain a 2 acre property (little mowing- have other mowers) and do not anticipate any hard commercial type use. All service, fluid and maintenance schedules will be closely followed. Compared to how some of these machines are used, this tractor will probably have rather leisurely life. However, I started looking at additional cost-effective options to increase longevity.

I am in southeast Texas and heat is the most serious challenge. This year, starting in mid June, daytime high temps were routinely 100+(F). Sometimes nighttime "low" temps are over 90. Even in winter, low temps rarely drop below freezing. So, I started researching options to keep everything cool and help monitor engine parameters.

My goals are:
1. Increase oil and/or filter capacity
2. Add an oil cooler (if warranted)
3. Add an oil pressure gauge
4. Add an oil temperature gauge

From my research it seems that installing a remote oil filter is a cost-effective option to achieve most/all of the goals. A remote filter opens the door to using larger oil filters (some will add a quart or more additional capacity). From there, throw in a few extra parts and plumbing to add the temp, pressure, and cooler options.

For those who see benefits, the most expensive part of the installation is the engine adapter. I found someone who wanted $50.00 for a used adapter. M and D Mower sells the current part number (122-0691) for $265.54. By comparison, the eBay item I posted ($29.00 + shipping for 2 adapters) seemed like a good deal for anyone interested in exploring this option.
 

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While your goals are admirable, the question becomes this.

Where is all this stuff going to be placed on the tractor?

Secondly, a cooler isn't of much use unless you have air passing over it so you will need a close fitting 12 volt fan mounted to it.
 

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If you're over 10 years old you may have difficulty realizing the benefits. These engines are good for over 3000 hrs just following the recommended maintenance schedule. If you just use it for snow removal I figure it'll last you well into the next century but, by then, the government will have confiscated all your property and banned the use of gasoline engines.:sidelaugh
 

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You certainly are not going to have much money invested to satisfy your intentions. You should take engine and oil temperatures prior to the adaption and compare them after. Let us know the results.

:thThumbsU
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
While your goals are admirable, the question becomes this.

Where is all this stuff going to be placed on the tractor?

Secondly, a cooler isn't of much use unless you have air passing over it so you will need a close fitting 12 volt fan mounted to it.
Fortunately, there seems to be ample space available on the 6018. Looks like the filter will fit beneath the engine between the frame rails. I picked up an Ingersoll hydraulic filter head, hoses, fittings, and air deflectors from an AH tractor. The deflectors will keep limbs and debris from whacking the unit. There is still space in that area for a cooler/fan. I will dimension out all the places a cooler will fit. I also found space behind the grill for a cooler.

Some of the guys over on the yahoo Onan Engine Club suggested looking at coolers originally designed for transmissions, ATVs, UTVs, motorcycles, etc. All shapes, sizes, and options (fans, thermostats, bypass valves...). Just need to be on the lookout for something appropriate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you're over 10 years old you may have difficulty realizing the benefits. These engines are good for over 3000 hrs just following the recommended maintenance schedule. If you just use it for snow removal I figure it'll last you well into the next century but, by then, the government will have confiscated all your property and banned the use of gasoline engines.:sidelaugh
Based on my current age, and assuming I correct for ALL the negative factors used in the life expectancy calculations (which I promise to do right after I finish this donut), I could live to be 97. If a well maintained Onan will clock 3000 hours, and at the expected annual usage rate of 50 hours per year, the engine will last another 56.6 years (or 14.6 years after my death). A comfortable margin.

However, if I extrapolate my current rate of usage, I will utilize the tractor at a rate of 70 hours per year, which reduces the future life expectancy to only another 40.43 years.

Do the math Bart! This leaves me 1.57 years short. Don’t you think adding the remote filter/cooler NOW will increase the engine life expectancy by 1.57 years, so we can least check out together?
 

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Do the math Bart! This leaves me 1.57 years short. Don’t you think adding the remote filter/cooler NOW will increase the engine life expectancy by 1.57 years, so we can least check out together?
I guess that is cutting it a bit tight but, unfortunately, I don't think I'll be around to remind you if your calculations are wrong.
 

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But at 97 years of age, I hope to have my progeny maintaining my yard.

One thought pops to mind. I'm not a hydraulic expert, but by increasing the distance and the volume the oil pump must pump, won't you lose some pressure? Just wondering?
 

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Shouldn't happen. Engine oil pumps are positive displacement gear pumps that put out X number of cc's of oil every rotation no matter what. Only the relief valve opening up and bypassing the oil back to the pan can interfere with the oil delivery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You certainly are not going to have much money invested to satisfy your intentions. You should take engine and oil temperatures prior to the adaption and compare them after. Let us know the results.

:thThumbsU
In the end, the practical advantages may not justify the effort, but it is a relatively inexpensive (and easily reversible) process. I figure as long as I meet or exceed factory specs, anything that has the potential to improve the process can't hurt.

But, like many other seemingly simple concepts, the real issues may be more complex than they first appear. I think most would agree that reducing excessive heat will increase engine longevity. However, this is not a case where “the cooler the better”. Slapping the biggest full-flow oil cooler and fan in the loop may do more harm than good. An air cooled engine is designed to operate within a defined temperature range. While high oil temperature is detrimental (to the oil and the engine), oil temps need to be high enough to burn off volatiles and water.

Which means additional research to identify an appropriate size cooler (with thermostatically controlled fan and/or cooler bypass valve to maintain desired temps?).

I probably enjoy the research more than the actual project. And, it keeps my hands and mind busy.
 

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Very interesting topic, I myself have been toying with the whole filtration concept. I had spoken to this hyd. expert who informed me that there is not much more than two filter media manufacturers in the world and they supply most of the paper filtration media to most over the counter filter manufacturers.
He went on to say that the hyd. projects that he is currantly working on utilize such good filtration that they NEVER change oil (since the cap. is hundreds of gal.) and only change the high capacity filters. Aparently these filters have specs of not only Psi, GPM, microns etc. but also the % efficiency after hundreds of hrs!
Aparently many of the over the counter filters lose a large amount of filtration shortly after install (which is why the oil is dirty). After his claims I thought I would just get one of these "better" filters but they will not physically fit in most engine applications UNLESS you use a remote mount. The other reason I am stalling is the cost per filter is ten times that of a std. unit.
Soooo I am still using the cheapo "oil gets dirty immediately" filters!
 

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I think the oil cooler idea is a fantastic one for those living in the South and for that reason alone it is great idea to replumb the oil filter system. Regarding filters. Does anyone know what filters have the same pipe thread and outer bead surface diameter, it seems to me that I could put a much larger filter on my OnanP218 (JD316) if I had a cross reference to all the filters that would match. And a bigger filter will also offer greater flow rate.
 

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Cross reference for Onan P series oil filters.


While a bigger filter may allow a higher flow rate, the pump would also have to be bigger to take advantage of that fact. A larger filter in this application just exposes a larger can surface area for slightly more cooling. That's approximately 6-7 sq-in over the 3.5" stubby stock filter for the longer 4.5" filter. The resulting greater area of filtering media allows the oil flow to take longer to pass through.

Is that a gain? Yes, marginally, considering that the stubby is almost entirely inside the engine tins exposed to cooling air flow from the flywheel and the extra length of the larger filter is exposed to relatively slow moving outside air. The extra filtering media theoretically can collect more particulate matter and last marginally longer between changes.
 

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Ok,
Cross reference for Onan P series oil filters.


While a bigger filter may allow a higher flow rate, the pump would also have to be bigger to take advantage of that fact. A larger filter in this application just exposes a larger can surface area for slightly more cooling. That's approximately 6-7 sq-in over the 3.5" stubby stock filter for the longer 4.5" filter. The resulting greater area of filtering media allows the oil flow to take longer to pass through.

Is that a gain? Yes, marginally, considering that the stubby is almost entirely inside the engine tins exposed to cooling air flow from the flywheel and the extra length of the larger filter is exposed to relatively slow moving outside air. The extra filtering media theoretically can collect more particulate matter and last marginally longer between changes.
Ok, so as I go through the cross reference list, I notice that every one of these filters (at least the ones I could easily find images of) is a stubby filter. So Im going to walmart and Im going to find a filter that matches the exact stem threading and base plate gasket diameter that is of a larger volume (longer). I will report back. If all of the filters have the same check valve back pressure setting then a standard large filter is better on all counts.
 

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Ok, consider this fram filter, I will have to do some more research to insure that the check valve operates at the same pressure as the OEM but it looks to be an exact match and with an added 30% more filter material. How can that be anything but better ?
 

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