My Tractor Forum banner

601 - 620 of 650 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #601
2462430


Anybody know where those two ball bearings go....?


2462431
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #602
Next up is to fabricate a pump guard. Has to be robust enough to prevent rocks, sticks or other debris from damaging the pump and/or hoses. It can serve as a stop for the FEL arm when the bucket is off and allow the front hydraulic ports to be used for another attachment.

2462457


The mounting tabs are a bit bent up and should have straightened them when the main mount was off. Dang....


2462458
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #603
Side note: The stuff I like for removing rust is Evaporust. It's a bit pricey, but doesn't damage the metal, burn your skin and is earth friendly.

2462459
 
  • Like
Reactions: cccoltsicehockey

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
they are your detent for that spool. There should be a spring to. it goes in the hole cross drilled in the picture. one ball on either side of the hole with the spring in the middle of the bore. push the balls against the spring flush as you put the sleeve over the spool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
You also will need to add a good lube to the bore in the sleeve and the spool area around the balls. it make it smoother when you push the handle to go into the detent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #606
Thanks for the info Tim. I knew the spring didn't launch, so it could only be one place - the solvent bowl used to rinse the grease off. Used a bolt magnet to troll the sludge on the bottom and - low and behold - a little spring emerged!

2462583


Yes, I used my favorite penetrating chain oil to lube the sleeve and shaft (PJ1 Black Label chain lube). I love this stuff - bought it for my only chain drive motorcycle (CBX-1000). It sprays on as a thin liquid which seeps into crannies - then gels up for a really sticky lube. Worked the shaft until all the gritty feel was gone and moved freely.Then packed the spring end with marine grease before screwing the cap on.

2462586


While cleaning and installing the new fittings I dropped the control on the bench and bent a port fitting :mad: Have to ride back to PIRTECH and get another. DANG!!

2462588


2462587


Once the new valve is on - tape it up and paint JD yellow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Thanks for the info Tim. I knew the spring didn't launch, so it could only be one place - the solvent bowl used to rinse the grease off. Used a bolt magnet to troll the sludge on the bottom and - low and behold - a little spring emerged!

View attachment 2462583

Yes, I used my favorite penetrating chain oil to lube the sleeve and shaft (PJ1 Black Label chain lube). I love this stuff - bought it for my only chain drive motorcycle (CBX-1000). It sprays on as a thin liquid which seeps into crannies - then gels up for a really sticky lube. Worked the shaft until all the gritty feel was gone and moved freely.Then packed the spring end with marine grease before screwing the cap on.

View attachment 2462586

While cleaning and installing the new fittings I dropped the control on the bench and bent a port fitting :mad: Have to ride back to PIRTECH and get another. DANG!!

View attachment 2462588

View attachment 2462587

Once the new valve is on - tape it up and paint JD yellow.

That's funny, I had 1979 CBX. Lit a few wooden match with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #609
I remember you mentioned that when we were talking about the oil pan. I have a 1980 (2nd year of the four - 79-83). Found the bike buried in the back of a garage when looking at an 87 R80 BMW. I had only seen one other in person. The guy couldn't keep it running and I bought it on the spot.

Rebuilt the carb stack and refurbished the bike end to end. Almost completely original. Six carbs, double overhead cam with 24 valves. It takes a full day to set the valves and balance the carbs.

2462738


2462739


2462740


2462743



It's a freak'n BEAST!


2462742
 
  • Like
Reactions: cccoltsicehockey

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #610
My friend Arden came over and we sorted the remaining hoses I made some time ago using the Johnson loader manual. It describes each hose, length and hookup. Worked fine for control valve and lift cylinders. Will have to wait until the bucket cylinders are installed to see if they reach. I ran out of JD yellow so just bought a can at the local hardware store..... it's a bit 'bright'.....

Also mounted the filter and ran the main lines from the backhoe. Cut the low pressure hose for the pump and fit things loosely to check they fit. The feed hose for the backhoe is 'just' long enough, but should work.

2462914


2462916
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I remember you mentioned that when we were talking about the oil pan. I have a 1980 (2nd year of the four - 79-83). Found the bike buried in the back of a garage when looking at an 87 R80 BMW. I had only seen one other in person. The guy couldn't keep it running and I bought it on the spot.

Rebuilt the carb stack and refurbished the bike end to end. Almost completely original. Six carbs, double overhead cam with 24 valves. It takes a full day to set the valves and balance the carbs.

View attachment 2462738

View attachment 2462739

View attachment 2462740

View attachment 2462743


It's a freak'n BEAST!

View attachment 2462742
Yep, I have some-timers and forget when I start to repeat my self.

Mine sat for wait a while because i was in search for both 3 into one pipes and front master cylinder or kit. it was a beast on rear tires for sure!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
21,846 Posts
Then packed the spring end with marine grease before screwing the cap on.
Depending on how low the winter temperatures get in your locale, you may want to clean that grease out of there.

A light film of hydraulic fluid is all that you want. Grease is too heavy and gets really stiff in cold temperatures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #613
Hmmm.... thanks Tudor. I'll ponder the grease. I was planning to sell the tractor once I finished doing the landscaping and drainage work, but have become unreasonably attached to it (surprise - surprise). I may just load it on the trailer and take it to Phoenix,which is where I plan to move after selling this property. Which reminds me.... once the refurb is finished I need to take it to the scale down the road and weigh it on the trailer. Then go home, unload, drive back and weigh the trailer. It was custom made and can carry more than most single axle 5'x10' trailers, but towing at 65-70 mph on pavement may overheat the tires. They are 6-lug Hi-Run, LQ229's with a max load of 2,540 lbs.

2463115


2463116
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #614
Tudor - I'm dangerously close to charging the hydraulic system and testing everything. It's completely empty of fluid and need to know the process for filling the first time.
Do I need to prime areas, particularly the pump, before engaging the PTO?
Do I need to bleed air somewhere? The filter valve has an air bleed plug on the 'IN' side.
Is there a sequence to working the cylinders to fill them? Main lift arm - then bucket?

I assume I will be continuously filling the 5 quart reservoir as it pushes fluid through the system. The FEL is 5 quarts plus the backhoe 10 quarts. I have a full 5 gallon bucket and about 2 gallons in a second one from filling the hydrostatic trans. My plan is to fill the system and work everything for 2-3 hours to ensure several full circuits of the fluid. Then flush the entire system by opening the return to the reservoir into a bucket and pour fresh fluid in until it equals a refill. Once complete - change the filter. Since the fluid isn't changed very often I want to have it as clean as possible for the first fill.

I'm now able to separate the backhoe by plugging the IN/OUT lines together so it's a loop back to the reservoir. I could flush the FEL first and then plug in the backhoe. Is there an advantage to doing it that way?

I'm a newbie and there's likely a better - preferred - correct - way to do it and truly appreciate all the advice I can get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #615
Timmah said:
Yep, I have some-timers and forget when I start to repeat my self.
Yeah..... I call it Half-Heimers. Half the time I can't remember crap....
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
21,846 Posts
Yeah, I call it old-timers now. In my youth it was simply absent mindedness.

Charging the system.

- Make a chart of the volumes of the cylinders. eg.
Lift cylinders - 2 X Bore ² X 0.7854 X Stroke = Volume (cu-in).
One quart = 57.75 cu-in.
Allow one quart for preserving the pump and to fill the lines, plus a second quart for filling the filter if not previously filled.. That leaves at least 3 quarts for filling cylinders before topping up the reservoir is necessary, 4.5 quarts for subsequent cylinders.

  • Disconnect the pump supply hose and squirt a couple of shots of oil into the pump to seal it.
  • Reconnect the supply hose and fill the reservoir. Check for leaks in the supply line at this time. Unlike the rest of the system, the supply line is under negative pressure when the system is operating and leakage is air going INTO the system.
  • Start the engine and begin the process while making use of the chart to determine fluid left. in the reservoir.
  • Cycle each cylinder, or pair of cylinders, 4 full stroke sequences before moving on to the next cylinder(s).
  • Check for leaks while doing the full stroke sequences, and again when finished all cylinders.
While the loader is easy to ensure that it is fully charged with fluid, the back hoe is not. The tractor needs to be several feet above ground in order for the stabilizer and boom cylinders to travel full stroke.

After the above sequence, the TLB is ready to go to work. Any trapped air left will be chased out through use and vented from the reservoir.

A note about flushing; unless there has been extensive welding, or it is known that a large quantity of dirt is in the lines, it is not necessary. The filter will catch anything that may be there. Change the filter after 10 hours if you have concerns.

Unlike an industrial system that has several hundred feet of pipe welded together, a TLB only has the reservoirs which are welded. A half quart of mineral spirits and a hand full of BBs along with some shake, rattle, and roll are all the flushing needed for a welded reservoir.

While there is no set sequence for which cylinders to charge in which order, common sense says that the arms must be raised in order to cycle the bucket curl cylinder(s) full stroke.

Actually, the really easy way to charge the cylinders is to disconnect the rod end, tie/block them up in such a way as they can fully extend the rod without breaking anything, and cycle them

Yeah, it IS rocket science. It's just on a smaller scale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #617
Great info Tudor. The plan is to charge the system on Friday when my friend Arden can come over to help.
All the backhoe cylinders can be disconnected on the arm end to fully extend. The FEL lift cylinders can't, but the bucket tilt can.

This week will be getting all the pivot pins sorted as there are temporary ones so the fit and function could be checked. I need two more fittings to complete the system - the IN / OUT fittings on the reservoir. All others have been tightened, but Arden will go through everything - routing / tightness - to double check.


2463301
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #618 (Edited)
I'm still concerned about the FEL left side main mount being bent. It makes the arm on that side is not a straight line or parallel to the right side. There's a LOT of play on the two bucket pivots so will watch when it operates to see what the affect is. If it can operate, I'll use washers to shim the pivot pins and take the lateral movement out.

The major issues with this whole rig have been associated with the fact it was worked hard and over stressed. All the pivot and mounting points show it.
I REALLY don't want to remove that side to have straightened....

This is the left side bucket tilt cylinder bracket mount, which uses the stock pivot pin hole and was modified for a larger cylinder. I could have put a 9/16 bolt in the hole, which is supposed to be 1/2 inch (shown). I may need to weld a plate on each side with the correct size hole. ~ OR ~ weld it in and drill again. ~ OR ~ widen it out and install a bushing. Because it doesn't function as a pivot now, I left it alone until i can see how the whole thing works.

You can see the brackets in the photo with the previous post. They DO NOT move, only relocate the pivot pin for the new cylinder. This is why I don't need to 'correct' it right now.

2463305
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter #619
Side Note: I was having a hard time finding a can of Hammerite Rust Cap paint to finish some areas. I love that stuff because it goes on like honey and dries hard as a rock. I use it to coat the underside of the JD-166 mow deck. Scrape and steel brush all the debris off, but doesn't have to be bare metal. When dry, it creates a water tight coat the grass doesn't stick to as much. It's easier to clean the deck and maintain it against rust, which adds years to it's life.

Found out it's been discontinued. The replacement product is XORUST, mfg by GPM and made in the USA. It's a little bit thinner, which flows better into the crannies. Seems to behave the same and dries an exact match to the Hammerite. As a bonus, it's a couple bucks cheaper.

2463307
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
I used Chassis Saver paint on the underside of my mower deck. Its a slightly less expensive version of POR 15.... Goes on easy with a brush, and dries rock hard. I got some where I didn't want it, and tried to sandblast it off.... Not happening.... Had to use a grinder.... :) 4 years later, there is some dirt under there, but, that's it. Clean it up, and it still looks the same as when I put it on.
 
601 - 620 of 650 Posts
Top