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Discussion Starter #1
My new to me 455 had some rust in the footrest area, along with under the seat. There were also a couple of scratches down to the black on the hood.

So....wire wheel to remove the rust on the seat pan and floor rest area. Then cleaned the hood really well.

Sprayed rattle can primer in the wire-wheeled areas and let dry 24hrs.

Then I hit it with Rustoleum John Deere Green, along with doing the same to the hood.

I have some slight orange peel on both the seat pan and hood.

What's the next step?

Can I just use a buffer to get it out? Do I need to sand and then re-paint? If so, how do I stop the possible future orange peel from happening again?

TIA
 

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So, you will want to observe the coating times carefully. You can add extra coats only during a short window or you then have to wait several days for the VOC to escape. I had the same issue when I did my machine. I've heard of others that were able to get the orange peeling out with some careful wet sanding but this is not one of my area's of expertise. I am better now that I know to observe the additional coating times.
 

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So, you will want to observe the coating times carefully. You can add extra coats only during a short window or you then have to wait several days for the VOC to escape. I had the same issue when I did my machine. I've heard of others that were able to get the orange peeling out with some careful wet sanding but this is not one of my area's of expertise. I am better now that I know to observe the additional coating times.

Yeah - that's the other area I need to figure out.

Can says within an hour, or after 48hrs. I'm a little impatient, but I did the re-coat within 40mins
 

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Orange peel won't polish out. If the paint is thick enough wet sanding and then polish will. Paint needs to be fully dry before anything though.

I'm sure there are some good youtube videos on wet sanding that can give you some basic procedures, grits to use, that kind of stuff.
 

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Sand with a block to clip the tops of the orange peel. The fingers are soft enough to follow the contour of the peel and take paint off of the valleys between the bumps.

A cold work surface will also cause orange peel when sprayed.

I've found that a light tack coat as the first coat will give the best finish. It doesn't even need to hide the primer, just give it some colour. Wait about 20 minutes and then apply a heavier coat that does hide the primer. Follow that about 20-30 minutes later with the full coat which can be laid on pretty thick, as in several even coats in succession. As long as the surface is wet, the overspray can blend right in and make a smooth, shiny finish without wet sanding later.
 

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Orange peel won't polish out. If the paint is thick enough wet sanding and then polish will. Paint needs to be fully dry before anything though.

I'm sure there are some good youtube videos on wet sanding that can give you some basic procedures, grits to use, that kind of stuff.
FYI - my experience with Rust-Oleum is that you need to wait a very long time for the paint to harden enough before it will sand. By a long time, it might be a week or longer.
 

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Sand with a block to clip the tops of the orange peel. The fingers are soft enough to follow the contour of the peel and take paint off of the valleys between the bumps.

A cold work surface will also cause orange peel when sprayed.

I've found that a light tack coat as the first coat will give the best finish. It doesn't even need to hide the primer, just give it some colour. Wait about 20 minutes and then apply a heavier coat that does hide the primer. Follow that about 20-30 minutes later with the full coat which can be laid on pretty thick, as in several even coats in succession. As long as the surface is wet, the overspray can blend right in and make a smooth, shiny finish without wet sanding later.
This is exactly what I did when I rattle can sprayed my hood. I preheated my hood and garage with one of those jet heaters. My last coats were real thick, but not runny/drippy thick, proper overlap and consistent spray distance is crucial. I watched several videos on youtube of this one guy who rattle can paints cars with Rustoleum and they look great. I made sure to mimic his technique and memorized what the overlap should look like when it blends in seconds after it is sprayed. It came out great using JD brand rattle can, no orange peel, smooth as glass... Until I moved the jet heater and it blew dust everywhere, you can see some flecks in the front.



 

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Unfortunately, paint does not hide any flaws like your long scratch. It only makes them more pronounced. I use spotting putty on scratches like that to fill them in before priming. No matter the advice you get, and you got some very good advice from this forum, rattle can painting is a lot more art than science. It takes time to learn all of the areas that can affect your paint job. Number one is to make the surface to be painted is perfect or any flaws will be pronounced after painting. Number two is to have good lighting so that you can look down a panel and see the dull and shiny places after you have sprayed. Number three is to have some sort of poor man's exhaust system, like a window box fan in one window and an open window across the room, to help with the dust problem. The last item is to follow the manufacturer's advice on their paint. Once you have painted several things, you will get the idea and learn the distance away from the item you are painting. Also, you can spray a much heavier coat on a horizontal panel than on a vertical panel. If possible I always try to paint on a flat surface instead of a vertical surface. The last tip is to leave any debris or bugs in the paint until it dried. I cannot tell you the number of gnats that have landed on my freshly painted surface. But if you wait they will wet sand out and lot leave a trace. But if you try to get them out while the paint is wet you will create a big gap in the paint that cannot be filled without over-spraying the area around it most likely creating runs. Stick with it and you will enjoy your effort.
 

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FYI - my experience with Rust-Oleum is that you need to wait a very long time for the paint to harden enough before it will sand. By a long time, it might be a week or longer.
That's why I didn't specify a time frame... I was also talking in generalities because all paints are different. Whatever someone uses it needs to be fully dry before wet sanding.
 

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I cannot tell you the number of gnats that have landed on my freshly painted surface. But if you wait they will wet sand out and lot leave a trace.


Well... sometimes they leave their feet. :tango_face_devil:
 
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