My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
933 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
C/L has a gt19.9 not too far from me, he's asking $800 for it. Seems a bit steep to me, so I thought I would ask for some input. This will be my first suburban(if I get it) so I'm not very familiar with them. I've seen comperable shape 16 hp subs for far less. From what I gather, the 19.9 is more rare. Would there be more of an issue with parts, attachments, or is most suburban stuff pretty interchangable? I guess my main question is, does $800 seem a bit high for this? I figure on offering maybe $500 and see what happens.

http://pittsburgh.craigslist.org/grd/1942385399.html

Discuss
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
That looks like a nice tractor. They were the last Suburban style tractor made, 79.

I guess it comes down to how much you think a 30 year old tractor is worth. How long you think a 30 year old tractor will last. I beleave they have a hour meter. Ask how many hours are on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
it depends on how much u wanna pay really no harm in asking if he'll take 500... but yes they are rare... and almost all the attachment from a suburban or ss will work on it... as far as parts go their not to bad to find just takes some looking and researching... i have one myself that i just bought not to long ago
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
933 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input, I'll email and see how many hours are on it. If nothing else, I'll get a chance to sharpen my haggling skills.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
903 Posts
if its running and working i would go 650
:ditto:

That's what I was thinking. $600-$650 is what I'd offer. That includes no suprises when you get there, such as some of my favorites from sellers: "I promise it was running yesterday", "the battery is dead, "deck has a little bit of a hang up", "needs new belts" etc... blah blah blah.. I'd offer that price for a machine that is kept up and all you'd have to do is get on, and use it. Anything other then that, I'd go $450-$500. Keep in mind, it's not restored.

The GT's are rare, but they're not extinct, so no sense of urgency. I looked at roughly 15 GT's last year before I settled on my 18. 4 were 19.9's. The 19.9 is somewhat harder to find, but again, they do pop up.

Asking for the reading on the hour meter I think is pointless and irrelevant. Plus, not all of them had an hour meter. It's a 30+ year machine, and it's going to have a lot of hours on it, plus what would your price gauge be if you had the hour reading? I'd go out and look at it before, it sells. They're solid(Onans are great engines), and if it's in good shape like he says, snag it before someone else does, but don't get pushed on price. Cash money on site talks, talk him down :goodl:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
I'm not sure if this helps or not, but I am also in the Pittsburgh area, and I drove to Donegal to get the tractor in this post (also my first Suburban). http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=149702

I paid $750 for an SS/18 with weights, chains, mower deck, snowblower, snow/dozer blade, and a nice sized dump cart (he was asking $850, and had turned down $500 for the tractor and deck only). I don't know if there is any difference in collector value between the this and what I bought.

I really was looking for a snow removal machine and a second grass machine, so this one fit my bill. I don't feel that I got the deal of the century, but I felt good about what I paid for mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
Asking for the reading on the hour meter I think is pointless and irrelevant. Plus, not all of them had an hour meter. It's a 30+ year machine, and it's going to have a lot of hours on it, plus what would your price gauge be if you had the hour reading?
You need to buy a high hour Onan and then have to rebuild it. Your tune will change in a heart beat when you see the price's.

If they used it 50 hours a year or 100 hours a year matters to me. Time's that by 30. If your going to buy it to park in the garage then no hours don't matter. If it's going to be a worker, hours matter.

Most people would rather not buy a so called restored tractor. When they hear restored they think, worn out, rusty old junk with fresh paint that someone did not take care of. Why else did it need restoring ?

Rare means nothing inless you have a buyer, restored means even less. Low hours means a lot.

The 19.9 I had did have a hour meter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
933 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
He emailed me today, didn't say no to the 550 offer, just that the 800 was negotiable. He also said that it had a working hour meter that he would check when he got home from work. We'll see what's up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
My SS/18 has a rotary style hour meter. However, it rolls over at 600 hr, if memory serves me. I just don't know how many times it has rolled over. I can't believe that a 30 year old tractor only has ~280 hours. What do you do in that case other than take a chance if it "feels" like a good machine?
 

·
Tractor hoarder/collector
Joined
·
2,456 Posts
I paid $500 for my 19.9 with a mower deck, and a guarantee that it ran(i knew the guy really well).....I tinkerd some with it and she runs, the carbs not the greatest but it runs pretty good...hour meter was standard on all the suburbans 18hp and larger....and they are easily miss read...and yes they roll around ALOT.....my ss18 had like 400hours it said when I bought it but its been around a time or 2 or more im sure, and ive rolled it around since I bought it(started it over and its got about 70 hours so far!!!! new machine then right ??? haha).....depending on which motor it has it can be really rare, the N52m motor was only used 1 year, in 1978 and then in 79 they replaced it with the smaller cubic in 19.9(really 20hp engines).....mine has the big 52cube motor is the ONLY reason i paid so much otherwise id ran away and not bought it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
SearsTractorFan,

I don't want to hijack this thread, but is there any information that you could tell me about my SS/18 with the Onan BG-MS that is in the thread in the link in post #8?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
Like joe said, most 30 year old tractors do have a lot of hours. But I don't agree the hours are pointless and irrelevant.

The hour meters do roll over like a old car. So that is hard to go by, but you will see signs of wear on a high hour tractor.

People buy old tractors and end up not happy sometimes because the tractor is wore out and needs more money in parts then its worth. Looking it over good before you buy can save you a headache.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
903 Posts
You need to buy a high hour Onan and then have to rebuild it. Your tune will change in a heart beat when you see the price's.

If they used it 50 hours a year or 100 hours a year matters to me. Time's that by 30. If your going to buy it to park in the garage then no hours don't matter. If it's going to be a worker, hours matter.

Most people would rather not buy a so called restored tractor. When they hear restored they think, worn out, rusty old junk with fresh paint that someone did not take care of. Why else did it need restoring ?

Rare means nothing inless you have a buyer, restored means even less. Low hours means a lot.

The 19.9 I had did have a hour meter.

I think that's a big generalization. I define restored as someone re-investing in the machine. For me, that has nothing to do with paint, all mechanical. I would agree that some sellers slap a quick coat of paint on a rusty tractor to flip them over at a higher price, but those types of machines as most of us know are easier to spot. I don't think I or "most people" ever looked at machine suspiciously from the onset and asked myself why did it "need" restoring.

It's pretty self explanatory when you look a machine over to see who put the time in and took care of it. That's plain to see if you know what to look for mechanically, but as you know it's not an exact science. Paint doesn't mean anything to me. I was told the hour meter on my GT quit working back in the 80's, so it was irrelevant to me in the buying process. I could tell the true level of wear on it after I pulled the engine apart and started looking at the internal components. Also, what if those supposedly low hours were really hard hours.

It would be great to know the amount of seat time the tractor/engine has on it at the time of purchase, but more often then not, it's impossible to tell on many of these tractors just by eye balling them.

I can do the math in my head, and if someone put new tires, new belts, new batt. and obviously took care of the machine, I have a ball park figure in my head to work off of. It would be impossible to pop the heads off of every engine when sizing it up in a driveway to see if it needs engine work etc.. Normally, I think you just rely on your eyes and ears and take a gamble.

Low hours mean something to buyers that can actually ascertain whether or not the machine actually has "low hours". When we deal in buying used high and low hour earth moving machines at work, hour meters have bearing. But with a machine such as this where the meter can be disconnected and reconnected at anytime, nah.

I got my hour meter working when I restored it. It would be easy to disconnect it, put it on a shelf, put hundred of more hours on it and then put it back on when I sell and tell the owner "has only xxxx low hours on it!"...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
I think that's a big generalization. I define restored as someone re-investing in the machine. For me, that has nothing to do with paint, all mechanical. I would agree that some sellers slap a quick coat of paint on a rusty tractor to flip them over at a higher price, but those types of machines as most of us know are easier to spot. I don't think I or "most people" ever looked at machine suspiciously from the onset and asked myself why did it "need" restoring.

It's pretty self explanatory when you look a machine over to see who put the time in and took care of it. That's plain to see if you know what to look for mechanically, but as you know it's not an exact science. Paint doesn't mean anything to me. I was told the hour meter on my GT quit working back in the 80's, so it was irrelevant to me in the buying process. I could tell the true level of wear on it after I pulled the engine apart and started looking at the internal components. Also, what if those supposedly low hours were really hard hours.

It would be great to know the amount of seat time the tractor/engine has on it at the time of purchase, but more often then not, it's impossible to tell on many of these tractors just by eye balling them.

I can do the math in my head, and if someone put new tires, new belts, new batt. and obviously took care of the machine, I have a ball park figure in my head to work off of. It would be impossible to pop the heads off of every engine when sizing it up in a driveway to see if it needs engine work etc.. Normally, I think you just rely on your eyes and ears and take a gamble.

Low hours mean something to buyers that can actually ascertain whether or not the machine actually has "low hours". When we deal in buying used high and low hour earth moving machines at work, hour meters have bearing. But with a machine such as this where the meter can be disconnected and reconnected at anytime, nah.

I got my hour meter working when I restored it. It would be easy to disconnect it, put it on a shelf, put hundred of more hours on it and then put it back on when I sell and tell the owner "has only xxxx low hours on it!"...

I think, you think, you know more then you do. We are way off topic, I'll leave it at that.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top