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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well it's done. Proof of concept that is for an alternate means of transporting my garbage can down the long drive on those days when there is too much mud to walk it.

My first thought was to build something I could use to pull the can. But after seeing a commercial product for cars/trucks that carried the can, I was inspired to find a way to lift and carry it using the tractor and a sleeve hitch.

When I set out I was just protyping with wood, to help we determine what to order in the way of metal. After starting with OSB for working out the shape, I then switched to real lumber. Then after cutting the first piece I began to realize there was a chance I could achieve a completely working unit out of wood alone if I beefed it up. I was correct, and it worked. I ended up with a sleeve hitch lift that handles a can + contents weighing in at 180lbs. Anything more and the actuator clutch kicks in. I think I can use it just the way it is, with a little paint of course.

To use the lift all I have to do is put the drop the arm onto the sleeve hitch and drop the pin in. Back the tractor up to the front of the can till the arm contacts the horizontal lift bar that is part of the can. Once contact is made I just press the sleeve hitch lift button on the dash and up she goes. Using this technique it will lift about 130-140lbs.

To get the full 180lbs I need to add a couple of straps between the sleeve hitch and the can to emulate a 3-point hitch lift methodology. When I do this capacity increases.

You can see the straps in the last two pictures.
 

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Awesome! That didn't take you long, either, from design to execution. Well done!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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That's brilliant! I'm going to have to see what I can make up for my Craftsman sleeve hitch. Such a great idea using a wooden block, it saves a ton of time in the fab process. This has got to catch on!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
sweet, I'm gonna make one myself. Got any measurements you care to share and/or how you bolted it together?
The laminated arm itself would fit tightly in a 20" x 7" x 4.5" box. The cross support bar is a 2x4 cut down to 2-1/2". This cross support is bolted to the arm with 8 or 9" 3/8" lag bolts. It has a 5/8" hole for the hitch pin, and a slight recess to slide over the hitch sleeve tube.

The three layers of wood are screwed together with 12 #14 3" wood screws, 6 through each side.

The angles at the sleeve hitch is 30 degree. The angles will need to be adjusted to your specific hitch. One of my goals was to have the flat surface nearest the can perfectly vertical when the hitch is at maximum elevation so the can would transport vertically.

If I make a metal version, I will make it so it is adjustable to work with sleeve hitches mounted at different working heights. I will also strive to move the lift point closer to tractor. The closer to the tractor the more weight it can lift.
 

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Nice job!! I don't see it any better made of metal either.With that little of weight,I wouldn't be too concerned about it spliting at the notch.:trink40:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Used it today. Worked like a champ. I even ran over to the neighbors house and picked up their can and carried to the street.
 

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Neat idea. Makes me want my township to use those garbage cans. I suggest trying a shorter laminated arm, so the garbage can raises 3-4 inches. Then the can won't lean so much at the beginning of the lift and maybe you won't need straps.

PS 180lbs of garbage! Is that one pick up a month?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Neat idea. Makes me want my township to use those garbage cans. I suggest trying a shorter laminated arm, so the garbage can raises 3-4 inches. Then the can won't lean so much at the beginning of the lift and maybe you won't need straps.

PS 180lbs of garbage! Is that one pick up a month?
Somewhere I read that the average household waste is 75lbs per week. Seems high to me. Anyhow the can itself says it's max rated capacity is 385 lbs so my lift can handle effectively half that. There are weeks though where the can is pretty heavy and rolling it down the gravel drive is real exercise.

I don't need the straps except if I want to achieve max lift capacity. If I attach them the can stays level during the lift operation, much like a 3-point implement, so peak lift effort is less. Right now the leaning is not a problem at all. Perhaps if the can is loaded super top heavy it could become an issue, but that is seldom the case at our house.

Today I hauled our can with straps and neighbors can without. No issues with either. The coolest part was being able to just back up to the can and press the button to grasp and lift.:thThumbsU
 

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Excellent job with this!!!

Unless I'm hallucinating, with the implement raised, the top of it appears to be at the same height that your hand would be if you were pulling it behind you.

So, if the weight is too much to lift the can, just turn the can around around, tilt it back, and hook the handle over the (raised) block, then use the tractor pull the can on its wheels. Sort of like the "yellow thing" in the other thread. :)

One question about the design. The connection between the (ripped) 2x4 cross support and the vertical laminated arm looks like it would be subject to quite a bit of torque. Are you worried about that, or does it look pretty solid when you raise and lower the can?

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
...Unless I'm hallucinating, with the implement raised, the top of it appears to be at the same height that your hand would be if you were pulling it behind you.

So, if the weight is too much to lift the can, just turn the can around around, tilt it back, and hook the handle over the (raised) block, then use the tractor pull the can on its wheels. Sort of like the "yellow thing" in the other thread...
You are not hallucinating. I made that observation too and tried. Problem is the can's handle has a support dead center so that prevents the handle from dropping in to the existing notch. However, modify the notch and you may be good to go.

One question about the design. The connection between the (ripped) 2x4 cross support and the vertical laminated arm looks like it would be subject to quite a bit of torque. Are you worried about that, or does it look pretty solid when you raise and lower the can?
At present I am not worried at all. It seems rock solid in my tests so far. The static shear load on the bolts is less than 200 lbs presently. The pull out strength of the two 8" long bolts is collectively >3000 lbs. Static shear and pullout stresses are greatest during the lift and lower when the can is in the fully raised transport position. This is good because that is when the dynamic stresses kick in. And if you have a heavy load and use the straps even these stresses are minimized.

Only takes a few hours to build if you have ready access to common hand tools for working wood.:thThumbsU
 
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