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1K Posts and climbing
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I am in need of some help. I did a search first, but had no luck. My sister has a 2001 PT cruiser with a cracked brake piston, and needs to change the caliper. Since I have never worked on this car before, other than an oil change, I have no idea what tools are required.

Will a gravity bleed be enough, or should she give it a couple of extra on the peddle??

Tips on bleeding would be helpful too.

Would some one on here be able to help out with a list of tools, and a bleeding procedure for her. She lives in Pennsylvania, and we are in Canada.
 

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certified tractor nut
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the caliper bolts most commonly used on chrysler products are 13mm, 10mm, or 8mm allen wrench. best way to bleed is to have her push on the pedal and hold it while she is holding the pedal down open the bleeder screw when the fluid coming out slows to a trickle tighten the bleeder and repeat until all air is out. as far as bleeding procedure on that car it goes like this right rear, then left front, then left rear, and last the right front. most newer cars use what is called a diagonally split system so that if you have a hydraulic failure you will have one wheel on each side of the car that is stoping it. they did this to prevent spinouts in slick conditions when brake failure occurs. almost forgot the bolt that holds the line to the caliper will be something between 10mm - 15mm, sorry its been awhile since i have had to replace a caliper on a pt so i don't remember the exact size. but hopefully i answered all your questions. any more just ask.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
the caliper bolts most commonly used on chrysler products are 13mm, 10mm, or 8mm allen wrench. best way to bleed is to have her push on the pedal and hold it while she is holding the pedal down open the bleeder screw when the fluid coming out slows to a trickle tighten the bleeder and repeat until all air is out. as far as bleeding procedure on that car it goes like this right rear, then left front, then left rear, and last the right front. most newer cars use what is called a diagonally split system so that if you have a hydraulic failure you will have one wheel on each side of the car that is stoping it. they did this to prevent spinouts in slick conditions when brake failure occurs. almost forgot the bolt that holds the line to the caliper will be something between 10mm - 15mm, sorry its been awhile since i have had to replace a caliper on a pt so i don't remember the exact size. but hopefully i answered all your questions. any more just ask.

Thank you. Since she is only replacing the one caliper, she will only need to bleed that, correct??
 

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certified tractor nut
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yeah you should only have to bleed the one unless the pedal still feels soft
 

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Calipers should be replaced in pairs for even braking, and safety.
 

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Bleeding will be easier if you don't leave the caliper line disconnected for very long. I suggest slightly loosening the line while the caliper is still on the car. then snug it to keep it from leaking. Then when the caliper is off, and with the other one ready to install, remove the line. Then position the new one and install the line. Bolt caliper in place. It can be gravity bled by opening the bleeder screw, and also the master cylinder cover. Make sure to keep the master cylinder full!!! Once the bleeder is dripping steadily, close the bleeder. Then pump the brake pedal until it is firm. Check the fluid level!! Now open the bleeder again and let drip for a bit, watching for air bubbles. Close and repeat.


Bob
 

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Old Fix it Guy,Paramedic
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That's all it needs is a caliper? Being a 01 it may need alot of parts replaced. Maybe a full over haul of the brackets, pins, slides, rotors and pads. The pads should wear fairly even on each side of a wheel. One pad much thinner then the other side pad may signal a problem. Pumping of the pedal when stopping can be a warped rotor.
She should invest in the single model repair manual at a parts store. They have pictures and procedures for doing repairs.

To bleed brakes you need some clear tubing that fits on to the bleeder nipple and a container to catch the fluid. Carefully loosed the bleeder screw or screws before you start. Remember Lefty Loosy, Righty Tighty.Then make sure they are shut and attach the tubing. Have a helper push on the brake pedal. When it goes all the way down hold pedal down. You close the bleeder then let up the pedal. Wait 15 seconds, do it again. Repeat till no little bubbles come out. Make sure you don't run the master cylinder out of fluid.
 
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