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Discussion Starter · #103 ·
Thanks very much for changing the thread title whoever did it. I tried to just drop the dates so the thread could just continue in the future.

I have a hemi in my Jeep so I know it takes at least 90 or 91 octane and I believe my wife's car takes at least 89 octane.
 

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Years ago my friend kept his bracket drag car here, 9.5:1 compression. He was running 112 racing gas. At the track I argued that was way too high octane, so I got 5 gal. non ethanol regular to mix in. Car ran 3/10th quicker. It was consistent before and after.

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Screenshot_2021-01-23-10-59-33(1)_compress6.jpg
 

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Has anyone considered what they call “pure gas”? There is a web site out there that helps identify places to buy it. It’s gas stations that sell gas without ethanol. I’ve gone to a couple and used the gas in my car and WoW! Much better performance and much better gas mileage for sure. The web site is: www.pure-gas.org Check it out and try some if there is a nearby fillin station.
 

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That Pure Gas list is way outdated.....they are showing places that I know have not even been a gas station in a really long time...like 15 years...that is here on Long Island
 

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That's a good site to find ethanol free gas, wherever you are. The information is submitted by users so it doesn't always get updated. You can call ahead to make sure they are still in business. Around here, ethanol free gas is higher octane and the price is significantly higher than regular 87. I use it in the 2-stroke machines but not in the vehicles. Nowadays, vehicles are made to run on corn fuel.
 

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Most cars and light trucks made today are designed to use regular 87 octane gas. Premium grade fuel costs more but adds nothing to the performance of the vehicle. If the vehicle is made for premium, you should use it. Otherwise, don't throw away your money.
My car is a Chevy Spark. It gets the name Spark because it adjust the spark according to what octane gas is being used. It only benefits up to 93 octane though.
 

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Interesting little car. 38mpg and under $20k loaded. You must be a commuter.
 
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