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I received this from a friend this morning and thought it worth passing on. Kind of long but worth it IMO.

This should be illegal. I will definitely use Costco from now on!!!!






COSTCO! read this...

Let's hear it for Costco!! (This is just mind-boggling!) Make sure you read all the way past the list of the drugs. The woman that signed below is a Budget Analyst out of federal Washington, DC offices.


Did you ever wonder how much it costs a drug company for the active ingredient in prescription medications? Some people think it must cost a lot, since many drugs sell for more than $2.00 per tablet. We did a search of offshore chemical synthesizers that supply the active ingredients found in drugs approved by the FDA. As we have revealed in past issues of Life Extension, a significant percentage of drugs sold in the United States contain active ingredients made in other countries. In our independent investigation of how much profit drug companies really make, we obtained the actual price of active ingredients used in some of the most popular drugs sold in America.


The data below speaks for itself.


Celebrex: 100 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets): $130.27
Cost of general active ingredients: $ 0.60
Percent markup: 21,712%




Claritin: 1 0 mg
Consumer Price (100 tablets): $215.17
Cost of general active ingredients: $0..71
Percent markup: 30,306%




Keflex: 250 mg
Consumer Price (100 tablets): $157.39
Cost of general active ingredients: $1.88
Percent markup: 8,372%






Lipitor: 20 mg
Consumer Price (100 tab lets): $272.37
Cost of general active ingredients: $5.80
Percent markup: 4,696%




Norvasc: 10 mg Cost of general active ingredients: $0.14
Percent markup: 134,493%




Paxil: 20 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets): $220.27
Cost of general active ingredients: $7.60
Percent markup: 2,898%



Prevacid: 30 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets): $44.77
Cost of general active ingredients: $1.01
Percent markup: 34,136%




Prilosec: 20 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets): $360.97
Cost of general active ingredients $0.52
Percent markup: 69,417%




Prozac: 20 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets) : $247.47
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.11
Percent markup: 224,973%




Tenormin: 50 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets): $104.47
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.13
Percent markup: 80,362%






Vasotec: 10 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets): $102.37
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.20
Percent markup: 51,185%




Xanax: 1 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets) : $136.79
Cost of general active ingredients: $0.024
Percent markup: 569,958%




Zestril: 20 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets) $89.89
Cost of general active ingredients $3.20
Percent markup: 2,809




Zithromax: 600 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets): $1,482.19
Cost of general active ingredients: $18.78
Percent markup: 7,892%




Zocor: /B 40 mg
Consumer price (100 tablets): $350.27
Cost of general active ingredients: $8.63
Percent markup: 4,059%





Zoloft: 50 mg
Consumer price: $206.87
Cost of general active ingredients: $1.75
Percent markup: 11,821%






Since the cost of prescription drugs is so outrageous, I thought everyone should know about this. Please read the following and pass it on. It pays to shop around. This helps to solve the mystery as to why they can afford to put a Walgreen's on every corner. On Monday night, Steve Wilson, an investigative reporter for Channel 7 News in Detroit , did a story on generic drug price gouging by pharmacies. He found in his investigation, that some of these generic drugs were marked up as much as 3,000% or more. Yes, that's not a typo... three thousand percent! So often, we blame the drug companies for the high cost of drugs, and usually rightfully so. But in this case, the fault clearly lies with the pharmacies themselves. For example, if you had to buy a prescription drug and bought the name brand, you might pay $100 for 100 pills. The pharmacist might tell you that if you get the generic equivalent, they would only cost $80, making you think you are 'saving' $20. What the pharmacist is not telling you is that those 100 generic pills may have only cost him $10!


At the end of the report, one of the anchors asked Mr. Wilson whether or not there were any pharmacies that did not adhere to this practice, and he said that Costco consistently charged little over their cost for the generic drugs.



I went to the Costco site, where you can look up any drug, and get its online price. It says that the in-store prices are consistent with the online prices. I was appalled. Just to give you one example from my own experience, I had to use the drug, Compazine, which helps prevent nausea in chemo patients.





I used the generic equivalent, which cost $54.99 for 60 pills at CVS. I checked the price at Costco, and I could have bought 100 pills for $19.89. For 145 of my pain pills, I paid $72.57. I could have got 150 at Costco for $28.08.


I would like to mention that although Costco is a 'membership' type store, you do NOT have to be a member to buy prescriptions there, as it is a federally regulated substance. You just tell them at the door that you wish to use the pharmacy, and they will let you in. (This is true.)


I went there this past Thursday and asked them. I am asking each of you to please help me by copying this letter, and passing it into your own e-mail, and send it to everyone you know with an e-mail address.


Sharon L. Davis
Budget Analyst
US Department of Commerce
Room 6839
Office Ph: 202-482-4458
Office Fax: 202-482-5480
E-mail Address: http://us.mc351.mail.yahoo.com/mc/[email protected]




This can be verified by clicking on the following link:


http://www.snopes.com/medical/drugs/generic.asp


Mike
 

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This is a pretty simplistic way of looking at it I admit. Drug companies are no different than any other company, turn a profit for the share holders. Cost of R&D, marketing, facilities, overhead, employee salary benefits and bla, bla, bla is huge. To me a better way of looking at this is profit margin, looking at cost of active ingredients vs price per pill isn't even close to realistic. It's like looking at the cost of raw materials used to make a car. 2 + 2 doesn't = 4

A free market (more competition) would help to bring the cost down. Drug companies have a lot of lobbyist in DC fighting to maintain the status quo, i.e. reduce our sources of us conveniently getting the meds at a lower cost from say Canada.
 

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This is a pretty simplistic way of looking at it I admit. Drug companies are no different than any other company, turn a profit for the share holders. Cost of R&D, marketing, facilities, overhead, employee salary benefits and bla, bla, bla is huge. To me a better way of looking at this is profit margin, looking at cost of active ingredients vs price per pill isn't even close to realistic. It's like looking at the cost of raw materials used to make a car. 2 + 2 doesn't = 4

A free market (more competition) would help to bring the cost down. Drug companies have a lot of lobbyist in DC fighting to maintain the status quo, i.e. reduce our sources of us conveniently getting the meds at a lower cost from say Canada.
I agree! One cannot look at raw material alone.(( research, medical studies, insurance, etc is very costly, and they sure do have lobbyists. !

If one built a house at only the cost of the studs and materials, would one make any money?

But:

Costco is looking very attractive!
 

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the only thing thats illegal is honesty.the cost of drugs is nowhere close to what they say.if your drugged its hard to tell whats high or not.theres no way of putting a smiley face on this one.sorry.
 

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Is the lower cost the co-payment through an insurance company, or straight "out of pocket" cost ?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I agree the information given in the original post does not cover everything involved in the cost of medications. Not even the ones listed. However I don't really think that was the point the reporter of this data was attempting to make. The simple fact that Costco is able to pass these drugs along to the consumer at such much lower costs says a lot about what is happening. Drugs that are available as generic have passed the time when a particular company has a monopoly on it and stores can charge as they see fit. Costco may be using the drugstore portion of their business as something of a leader to get people into the store but that's OK with me.

From what I see in this information and on the Costco web site their prices are out the door for anyone that wishes to buy them that has the proper prescription. Haven't stopped to check yet but intend to the next time I get to a town that has a store.

Another thing that has happened now is some, ours included, insurance companies are dropping drug coverage policies due to the recent laws enacted by congress. Our company sent us a notification recently that our current policy would expire the end of this year and they would no longer be issuing a similar policy. The only replacements we have found so far would be five to six times as expensive.

About the drugs being less expensive in other countries. five years ago I was in Mexico visiting our son and daughter-in-law. I had a bit of an episode with my heart and they took me immediately to the best heart man in Mazatlan. He, personally, met us at his office at nine at night, spent three hours with me and got things under control. He wanted to put me in a small, specialized, hospital for the night but I wanted to go home. The blood tests, EKG, ultrasound and all the other stuff, including his time, cost me $105.00 US. I bought the medications I needed for the next two years, after which the pills were past expiration, for under $600.00 US. Way less than the co-pay would have been using my insurance policy in this country.

Upon returning to The States a month later I checked with my regular heart doctor and gave him the information the Dr. from Mexico had given me. He checked the EKG strips and other information and said he was sorry they had missed the problem earlier. Did not suggest changing any of the drugs or adding any. To date I've had no further heart related incidents.

Just what I experienced and not saying out of country treatment is for everyone.

Mike
 
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