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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am posting this here instead of in "Mechanical, Paint,Restorations" because I would like to know what other CASE GT owners have done.

I am the new owner of a '74 446 and a '75 446. Both pretty much basket cases, but out here on the west coast I can't really be choosy.

I will post picks and I am working on getting them running while doing some paint prep on them.

I have a question for Snotrocket ( I have seen his rebuild photos) and others who have repainted their machines.

To prep for repainting... Do you prefer sanding,chemical stripper, sandblasting. I have done a bit of each on my '74.

The hood was good candiate for sanding to remove some rust, old paint and to keep things smooth, same for the fenders.
Inside and under the battery box area I have beadblasted to remove surface rust. I don't really like beadblasting because the beads get everywhere.

I chemical stripped on the hood as well.

What about on the inside of the frame? Should I just worry about making smooth transitions from the chipped/missing paint to good paint or try to remove it all. These will not be show tractors. I will be using them for sure. I just want to protect them and get them/ keep them looking good.

What about final degreasing/prep right before painting.

( I have read Mark777s basic painting tips and learned a ton)

Any info opinions would be appreciated.
 

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What I usually do is have everything sandblasted. Clean out all sand. Then prime it with red oxide primer. Let it dry a few days, then spray it lightly with a good quality paint. Let dry a few days, sand off the gloss lightly and spray it again with a hardener added possibly, let it dry again, then very carefully sand the gloss shiney off and spray it with a clear coat.
That's what I do anyway, but it can be done many ways and still achieve a nice look. Clean is key, no dust.

Good luck with it.
:fing32:
 

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In your painting, just remember that the prep is the foundation for the finished product. remove as much of the old paint as you can. I prefer to strip or blast depending on the condition of what your painting. Use a good primer, epoxy is the best. Again this is if you plan on keeping it and do not want to redo in a few years. There are cheaper primers but I find epoxy primers give the strongest base. Prior to paint lightly sand with a 320 grit paper, wipe down with a prepsol to remove any oil or grease, dust with air, removing what dust may be in hidden areas. Spray the first coat paint lighty on your item, being carefull not to apply to much, because this is a tack coat. Let this dry for atleast 20-30 minutes, again depending on drying conditions. When tacked up this will give your 2nd coat a base to adhere to. On applying your second coat put an even coat of paint on being carefull not to apply to much. Your looking to get an even coverage of color without runs in the paint. Again wait another 20-30 mins then apply your third coat of paint. You will not need to sand between coats. I use a HVLP gun to spray with and they use very little air and less paint [close to half less paint than the standard high pressure guns] If you need any more help PM me any time.
 

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BruceC advice is spot on. My paint job really isn't that great. Getting all of the old paint off and using a good high fill primer is the key.
 

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I agree but would like to add that sanding the primer down and then priming again is essential. The final coat of paint is nothing more than a reflection of all the prep work done prior to its application. If you don't sand, prime, sand prime, fill, sand, prime etc to bring the item to perfection, then any flaws will be magnified by the final color coats.

Cheap products produce cheap results. Spending the extra for the epoxy primer and paint hardener makes for a big difference in how the paint looks and how long it lasts. If it's worth doing in the first place, then it's worth doing well.
 

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I agree but would like to add that sanding the primer down and then priming again is essential. The final coat of paint is nothing more than a reflection of all the prep work done prior to its application. If you don't sand, prime, sand prime, fill, sand, prime etc to bring the item to perfection, then any flaws will be magnified by the final color coats.

Cheap products produce cheap results. Spending the extra for the epoxy primer and paint hardener makes for a big difference in how the paint looks and how long it lasts. If it's worth doing in the first place, then it's worth doing well.
Excellent advice. If I had to do it all over again I would have taken a lot more time with the prep work. You can see where I left some of the old paint on through the new finish up close.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bruce C. Snotrocket,castoff,

Thanks so much for the advice. That info really helps.

I am now in the disassembly stage, soon I'll be removing paint. I was not sure if I should get all of the old paint off or try to belnd from old paint to bare metal where paint is missing. Now I Know.
 

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Bruce C. Snotrocket,castoff,

Thanks so much for the advice. That info really helps.

I am now in the disassembly stage, soon I'll be removing paint. I was not sure if I should get all of the old paint off or try to belnd from old paint to bare metal where paint is missing. Now I Know.
If you want a high quality finish, then you must do one of two things.

A. Strip to bare metal

B. Prime, sand smooth, prime again, sand smooth, prime again.. until all the imperfections disappear. Block sanding shows up the low spots but block sanding on small surfaces or curved/bent/angled surfaces is difficult.
 

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Castoff is right on sanding is most important. I'm sorry forgot to mention sanding the primer. But if you use an epoxy primer such as DP40 made by PPG you do not need to sand and it is not required. However it is costly.
 

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Snotrocket, Your paint job is fine, one only has to see the before and after pictures. We use these tractors, not show them. If they were intended to be in a show then our approach would be entirely different.
JoeyB I also failed to mention that 5F5 is a great stripper and is found in most hardware stores. It is in a blue and black can. I buy it gallon size, I always have it on hand. Just remember to rinse well after using, and it will burn your hands so use caution.
 

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Castoff is right on sanding is most important. I'm sorry forgot to mention sanding the primer. But if you use an epoxy primer such as DP40 made by PPG you do not need to sand and it is not required. However it is costly.
Bruce,
Are you saying that an epoxy primer can be sprayed onto a badly pitted surface in one coat and then the finish coat can be applied afterward with no sanding required?
 

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Question for those of you that have used the epoxy primer.. Did you use a HVLP gun and if so did you use the same tip for both the primer and the paint/clear? Im trying to decide on what is my best option to paint my tractor this winter. I work in a metal fab shop with a big paint booth. I have been painting for a few years now here but we use a totally different paint compared to most basecoat/clearcoat setups. WE deal with Sherwin Williams so I try to see what they have to offer. If not then I will try the local Napa. I read somewhere on here that Napa had a color that was very close to power red.
 

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if your not worried about the pitting, and you just want it to be durable and shiny heres the plan. you cant buy dp 40 anymore, i think you can get dp L.F., thats the lead free. the dp 40 is black, you used to be able to get dp 90, i think thats the red, i might have them backwards. anyway be sure to get the red, it will cover alot guicker. just dont use the white because it has no anti-corrisive agents in it. if you start with clean, sandblasted metal, hang the pieces, mix the red dp as a sealer, not a primer, using a 1.2-1.5 tip gun( same tip size works for sealer,paint and clear). then you can recoat without sanding for up to 48 hours. you should be ready in as quick as 20 minutes if its around 72 degrees. this method requires no sanding at all. blast it, hang it, seal it one coat and then go right in with a single stage eurathane, two to three coats, first coat being a tack coat, followed by one or two more depending on coverage. i would recomend using Omni brand single stage color coat(with reducer and hardener) over the dp as they are both products of ppg. the only thing you want to be sure of is when the parts get blasted you want to get sealer on em as soon as possible as porus blasted metal rusts real quick in the pits. i hope that makes sence
 

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Great reply, My DP 40 is green, and I did hear that it wasn't available anymore. I don't get the paint codes or product information anymore, never renewed my shop. My mistake, I'm doing more of it now that I retired and enjoying more. Omni is PPGs cheap line of paint, I've never had any problems with it, but you get what you pay for in paint. For the hobby painters Omni or Crossfire [napa]is the way to go, and with a little effort most people will be happy with the results.
 

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How about for us non-gun, non-booth, non paint booth type of guys that just wants to protect our machines for work purposes.
What type of rattle can paints are suggested?? I know I can still buy Cub paint in the rattle cans.
I'm not looking for show quality just protection, though I have nothing against show quality.
After today I'll be needing some Case colors!!! I hope.
 
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