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Discussion Starter #1
First off let me start, i got this tractor 5 years ago (at a yard sale for $25 yes $25), we had it running 3 years ago it ran for 3 mins then started knocking, its sat in the garage doing nothing up until now.

Power king serial # is 44765


Kohler engine is a k321s
spec # 60287d
Serial # 8264160

First two pictures is of the knock, turn it over so it gets to the top in picture 1.


now when its up, hold the engine so it is not suppose to turn over and you can push the piston down about 1/4 of an inch without any rotation of the crankshaft
2. (pushed down)


What could be wrong in the bottom end?

ok so i got all the sheet metal off the tractor undid all the wiring ect, i have it down to this



Im trying to remove the engine, all the bolts and wiring is undone ect. the only problem i am having is separating the engine from the clutch wheel thing

I would like to sperate the purple arrow from the red arrow without removing the bell housing that the black arrow points to, i have the two allen head set screws removed it just doesnt budge, how do i separate it?



and heres the rest of the pictures

Serial #


engine


gas tank


hood panels

hood


broken spring on the mule drive? where can i get another one? one is good one is broken
 

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Sounds like you have a rod/crank knock. As far as removing the engine, Remove the bell housing with the engine. That pulley/flywheel combo has to probably be "pushed" off the crankshaft. Need to rig up a pusher/puller for that.
 

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I agree with Mike. Bolt that bell housing back up to the engine and remove the 10 bolts (may be 8 I can never remember) that hold the bell housing (clutch housing) to the clutch pedal housing. The clutch flywheel and clutch housing will all go with the engine. Hope you are strong as the assembly is heavy.

As far as your knock is concerned, the rod may have come loose at the bottom. I've had this happen before. The person that put my engine together didn't torque the bolts properly and it worked loose over time. Tightened it back up and it's been good ever since. I would consider that before buying parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
so really all i would have to do is drain the oil, and flip the motor on its side with the clutch stuff still attached and pull the oil pan and re torque the rod bolts? :praying:
 

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If they are loose and there is no damage but it may be worse,loose bolts are the best case scenario.You will be able to see whats bad when you pull the pan.Complete rebuild for the kohlers is fairly cheap and a well maintained cast iron kohler will run indefinitely.May want to rebuild it once its out.Love the power king btw and have wanted that exact model for years.Good luck and please keep us posted with plenty of pics.
Scott
 

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To answer your question, yes, to check things out, that's all you have to do. I agree with Motopsycho though that the loose bolts would be your absolute best scenerio. If the bolts are loose, there's a reason for it. My reason is the bolts were never properly torqued to begin with. This COULD be your problem but look things over real good before you put it back together and see what you can see.
 

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Be careful with removing the flywheel and do not try to pry it off. They have been known to crack. I have seen a trick (on another powerking forum), where the person took two bolts with nuts and used them as a pusher. He had the head of the bolt up against the rear of the engine and the nuts were against the flywheel with the end of the bolt hanging to the side of the flywheel by 2" (or so) Slowly turn the nuts out one or two turns per a side.

Take it slow and easy, and don't forget to first remove the two set screws in the flywheel.

Once the flywheel is off, besure to check the condition of the snap ring located inside of the flywheel. Those tend to rust into pieces and then you would have to repeat this entire process at a later date.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Got the engine off the powerking at 1:30 am today (took the housing and all off) removed the oil pan. 1 nut was missing from the rod bolts, the other one was loose, rod is a little chewed up, crankshaft looks to be okay, piston you can see yellow on the skirt (got hot?) looks like heat marks to me, also the cooling fins have dirt built up in them, either i think the old owner ran it low on oil or the fins weren't letting it get cool enough. Piston is also in bad shape around the top edges it broke pieces off. What should the measurement around the crankshaft be where the rod attaches, how much tolorance is allowed, and same question with bore size? I'll try to get pictures up this week. The only bad news is i didnt work on it sooner and forgot there was oil in it until i took the oil pan off and now the garage floor looks like the gulf of mexico :fing20:
 

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I have a home made fly wheel puller for power kings that bolts on the fly wheel and pulls it right off with out brakeing it. I made it after i broke one. Whip Lash.
 

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I did what cjlinkster said above with the two bolts to remove mine in the past and it worked great. This the only way to separate the flywheel from the crank shaft on some of the older models because even when you have the clutch housing separated, you can't remove it because the flywheel has a larger diameter than the opening in the clutch housing. On these you can't use the flywheel puller because you can't get it in there. Just remember on reassembly you have to do that again in reverse. Before putting it back together clean up the crankshaft end and inside of the flywheel, then put some never seize on it and hand fit the whole thing on and off until it slides easily.
 

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Ariensman 2 ,you are right about the two bolts taking off the flywheel.i have a lot of time on my hands so in my small metal shop i like to build things that i can use in work. This past winter i made 4 large belt grinders to make knifes with, they sell real good. They use a 2/72 in. Belt & have 2 buffing whells on it also. I tend to do things the long way so i don't have to spend a lot of time in the house.
 

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I really like Kbeitz idea above with that homemade spreader tool. That one will work for sure as it uses the same principal as the two bolts. I thought of making one too but then again, I just got mine done and it slides on and off now with ease hopefully it will come off that easy again in 20years or whenever it has to come apart again. LOL.
 

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If you split fire wood, you probably have wedges. My brother taught me a great trick for taking the flywheel off using these wedges. Engine on a bench, two wedges, one on each side positioned between the block and the flywheel with the point up so it sits on its own. Now you take two more wedges and place them between the flywheel and the wedge already in position with the point down (like you were sliding them together to form a rectangle). One on each side. Now begin to tap the upper wedges with a hammer. Couple of taps on one side, then the same on the other. No concentrated pressure on the block and this method worked probably faster than any other method I've used. The best part is, you never touch the weak point of the flywheel so there's no chance of breaking it.
 

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QUOTE If you split fire wood, you probably have wedges. My brother taught me a great trick for taking the flywheel off using these wedges. Engine on a bench, two wedges, one on each side positioned between the block and the flywheel with the point up so it sits on its own. Now you take two more wedges and place them between the flywheel and the wedge already in position with the point down (like you were sliding them together to form a rectangle). One on each side. Now begin to tap the upper wedges with a hammer. Couple of taps on one side, then the same on the other. No concentrated pressure on the block and this method worked probably faster than any other method I've used. The best part is, you never touch the weak point of the flywheel so there's no chance of breaking it. QUOTE

Now that my friend is Slick!:fing32: I like it.
 
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