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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I moved to the country last month from the rat race suburbia, but have always been outdoors in all types of areas for my 68 years.
My new place was vacant for 4 or 5 years, with just the owner's son coming to cut the 4 acres of lawn periodically. It is on hilly land that slopes to a small lake with a mixture of trees out in the open and couple acres of mature woods on each end of the property. The acreage was over grown in many areas, and I am gradually paring back the overgrowth.
I have cut back weeds, milkweed, thistle, briars, strawberries and raspberries for 6 weeks now, leaving what is a large inventory of hostas, and various flowering plants the former owners had in a dozen rock lined beds around the property and by the lake.

I left a type of plant that looked ornamental to me. They grow among the flower beds and around a shed and under several large spruce trees. In late July these are from 4 ft to 8 ft tall, have reddish stalks reminiscent of rhubarb in color, and very lush green leaves. Now they are putting out some berry like pods. I can't recall seeing this in Central/Thumb area of Michigan before, but I am no gardener or botanist by any means.

Someone has said they think these are poisonous weeds, and they might be "Poke Weeds". I looked that up and the appear similar, but not quite the same.

Does anyone recognize this plant?
 

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I live in the south and it does look like Poke with those purple stalks. The poke plants here have dark purple berries in late summer. Its an invasive plant here so I spray it to keep it down
 

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I can't help you with your plant identification, but I just wanted to say that your new place sounds great with the lake and all. Hope you really enjoy it.
 

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We call those pokeweeds. They have been nasty little buggers to get rid of here. They have a long tap root, and will just resprout if you chop them off. I've been working on knocking them back for a few years, but still have young ones coming up from seed.
 

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My grandmother used to cook the greens from Polk weed.
She liked it, but I thought it was kind of awful!

I guess those that lived through the depression learned to live off of anything that grew nearby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sounds like I have Pokeweed, and will have a project on my hands to get rid of these things. I might cut them down to a foot leaving some leaves on, then spray with Roundup or similar to get the roots.

Some interweb comments are that it is used in Poke Salad, and even the berries in jams and pies, but there are also toxins in the plant especially the root. I am not that adventurous so they will be removed.

Thanks all or the tips and Sevenhills for the video. It was a regular on AM radio the late 1960s and I'd forgotten all about it. Great to hear it again. Thanks!
 
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I use “Picture This” it is a plant identification app it works great.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I got me some poison ivy last week at my parents house doing yard work I didn't even see it in all that mess I tell u my right arm and rib cage are very itchy
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Lotion with zirconium in it might help PI some. Used to sell it as Ziradryl but not sure you can find this stuff anymore.

Heard that jewel weed that tends to grow in ditches made into a paste has positive results.

US Forest Service:
"Jewelweed has a long history of use in Native American medicine. When applied topically, sap from the stem and leaves is said to relieve itching and pain from a variety of ailments, including hives, poison ivy, stinging nettle, and other skin sores and irritations. The sap has also been shown to have anti-fungal properties and can be used to treat athlete’s foot"

2513863
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All parts of the Poke plant are poisonous. It can be eaten but there is a very specific method to remove the toxins. Best to just cut or spray it and get rid of it.


Toxicity, poisoning and mortality

All parts of the plant can be toxic and pose risks to human and mammalian health. Toxins are found in highest concentration in the rootstock, then leaves and stems, then the ripe fruit. The plant generally gets more toxic with maturity, with the exception of the berries, which are dangerous even while green.


 

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Yep I'm 99% sure that is the poke plant--- the berry on the poke plant are hanging close to the group of berry's--On the sumac the berry's are completly hanging different --just look at the photos above.

My Dad has make a drink out of the berry's.
Mom and about every one old enough here in the south has cooked some poke leaves --I think mom cooked them down pored the first water out then cook them down again. Most all of my folks liked this --we called it poke salad.

I guess all the ones that would eat them around here has found them hard to use now.

They might still use the plant deeper down south.
 

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Oh by the way I live on 2 acers and could find some out back of my sheds now. We always would pick them when young--or just the top tender leaves of the older plants. I still like to look at them when they are less than waist high--but I get rid of them before they put on berry's. By the way birds eat the berry's and spread the seeds so they can come back. Good luck.
 
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