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I have poison ivy growing on an oak tree and a pear tree, both are in the front yard (surrounded by lawn).

I tried manually removing it last year, pretty sure that gave me a rash. And, it grew back, so that didn't work...

So, is there a chemical that's safe for the trees (and lawn), and preferably won't poison the pears (which we eat)?

Thanks.

Mike
 

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I've used Ortho Poison Ivy and Brush killer in spray on a quarter acre of infested woods/field. May and June best time to hit the ivy leaves with it, but any time it is actively growing is helpful.

Gotta watch it every year until it's gone. I had it covering the woods floor and after 3 years of attack with the Ortho, I'm now down to just the odd plant. It is tough to conquer. Sounds like your's is confined. I've been told you can use the liquid and "paint" it on the leaves of the ivy only, thus avoiding the risk of over spray of nearby plants. It takes the poison in through the live leaves and kills the plant to the roots.

"Triclopyr" is the active ingredient you want to see on the label.

It is tough to get rid of, but once you get the rash bad enough, the mission becomes clear, just get rid of it!!!

DO NOT - UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES - EVER TRY TO BURN POISON IVY !!!
 

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Cut the vine without harming the tree and brush paint straight Triclopyr on the root end of the vine where you cut it. It will kill the poison ivy without getting into the ground and harming the trees.
 

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I’ve kept on top of it in the past. Clip the vines near the ground with wire cutters and latex gloves. Wash cutters with brake cleaner (alcohol) when done. Eventually it withers and dies. Remove it from tree at that point (using disposable gloves) and discard. Compost?
On poison oak, the oils from cutting the vine I think are what get me. As such, I remove it prior to cutting up the log to use for firewood — not after cutting the log. My chainsaw expels sawdust on my stomach, so I even get a rash through my shirt. Symptoms show up 3 days later. By then, too late. It starts spreading. Downward. Yeah....
I learned all this the hard way. Except the part about burning it. Fortunately I learned that’s bad (on this forum) before I burned it. That’s the easy way of learning.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys, this is perfect advice!

I'm sure there's more in the woods, I just don't have a reason to go and find it.

I do know not to burn it, learned that here too!

Mike
 

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Cut the vine without harming the tree and brush paint straight Triclopyr on the root end of the vine where you cut it. It will kill the poison ivy without getting into the ground and harming the trees.


From experience getting rid of Poison Oak and Ivy growing on desired trees.

May have to cut more than one vine if multiple small vines growing up the tree trunk and leave a small stub at the lower section for direct brush on herbicide application. Do not be concerned about the leaves and vine in the trees, they will die and eventually fall out if they have no feed vine. If the vine is large and stuck/glued to the trees bark you will have to remove a chunk out of the vine and pull the ivy feeder loose from the tree and apply the herbicide. You can usually use a lobber to cut and pull, but if the vine is large you may have to use a hatchet to cut then remove a 4 to 6 inch joint of the vine.. Just take care that any tools used will have the Ivy sap on them.:tango_face_sad:

May take up to 3 years or so to keep the re-sprouts killed also. (new young poison ivy and oak vines grow fast the following year.

I've seen people ignore large vines on trees right in a yard and if the vine is attached firmly to the bark on a tree the vine will eventually cause the tree to get a disease and the tree will die. (seen this several times)
 

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Every poison ivy leaf on my property gets a spray of Roundup. I've had very good success doing this. It kills to the root. I had one white pine that died a couple of years after I treated I treated it for ivy, but I don't know if the events were related.
 

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Several places in my yard are now poison ivy jungles,like under the deck,and in the back of the house,the area between the house and a shed has a thick layer of it growing ,and its creeping towards the house..

I was thinking of using salt in my garden sprayer to kill it off and the weeds along the foundation..I'm not too concerned if nothing will ever grow back in these spots again,in fact I'd be happy if they didn't...
I don't have the money for commercial herbicides like Roundup and would rather not use it period,since I have feral cats that I dont want to poison keeping mice at bay..
I need a cheap "home brew" to kill the vines and weeds..

I must have pulled 50 feet of vine roots out of the ground that were growing along side of the garage,some of them broke off rather than coming up--I'm not sure if its poison ivy,it doesn't have the same reddish 3 leaf type of foliage,and it was coiling around all the poles,pipes and even an electrical cord ,it took some doing to get it all off--I didn't get a rash or itchy after dealing with it,but I did wash my hands with gas before going in the house,and washed my clothes with bleach & detergent right away..

I have some vines that are over 1" thick I cut off near the base of the trees they were growing on,they are "furry" looking and don't have that many leaves ,but I'm 90% sure its poison ivy..they have been dead a few years now,but I still avoid going near them..

If I cut any trees with those vines on them I let the logs age until the bark falls off,with the vines still attached--I have burned a lot of the wood from trees like that with no ill effects,but it does make me worried none the less..had a neighbor in my hometown that burned a brush pile with poison ivy in it and I got a good dose of it in my throat and lungs...don't care to live thru that again..
 

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Several places in my yard are now poison ivy jungles,like under the deck,and in the back of the house,the area between the house and a shed has a thick layer of it growing ,and its creeping towards the house..

I was thinking of using salt in my garden sprayer to kill it off and the weeds along the foundation..I'm not too concerned if nothing will ever grow back in these spots again,in fact I'd be happy if they didn't...
I don't have the money for commercial herbicides like Roundup and would rather not use it period,since I have feral cats that I dont want to poison keeping mice at bay..
I need a cheap "home brew" to kill the vines and weeds..

I must have pulled 50 feet of vine roots out of the ground that were growing along side of the garage,some of them broke off rather than coming up--I'm not sure if its poison ivy,it doesn't have the same reddish 3 leaf type of foliage,and it was coiling around all the poles,pipes and even an electrical cord ,it took some doing to get it all off--I didn't get a rash or itchy after dealing with it,but I did wash my hands with gas before going in the house,and washed my clothes with bleach & detergent right away..

I have some vines that are over 1" thick I cut off near the base of the trees they were growing on,they are "furry" looking and don't have that many leaves ,but I'm 90% sure its poison ivy..they have been dead a few years now,but I still avoid going near them..

If I cut any trees with those vines on them I let the logs age until the bark falls off,with the vines still attached--I have burned a lot of the wood from trees like that with no ill effects,but it does make me worried none the less..had a neighbor in my hometown that burned a brush pile with poison ivy in it and I got a good dose of it in my throat and lungs...don't care to live thru that again..
You might look at some pictures on the computer so as to help ID what you are seeing.
Poison Ivy and Poison Oak= LEAVES OF THREE, LEAVE ME BE.

Virginia Creeper looks similar to the Ivy/Oak vine but has more than 3 leaves, usually 5 leaves and is invasive but not poison sap. Wisteria is another vine type plant that can become a nuisance and is very invasive and hard to control. Wisteria is not a good plant to have around dog/cats/and kids. Is a poison if consumed.
If you were removing the pulling the vines/roots by hand even using rubber gloves, etc and did not get any signs of blisters/rash, etc you are most likely not dealing with a Poison vine.

I'm not allergic to Poison Ivy or Oak, (some people just look at a picture of it and break out) but the more often a person is exposed to such you do not build up an immunity, the more times you are exposed the more likely you will eventually get a dose of such next time around.

Sumac bushes are also a bad thing for some people (same sap family as Poison Ivy/Oak) and they do not even know what Sumac bushes look like. (red berry type Sumac that birds eat)


From first hand experience.
It seems that if it's a tree that you want to save or not kill it will die. (and is most likely leaning over the house or shop building so as it cannot be just readily felled easily)
You have to be really cautious using Round-up or even a labeled weed killer (weed killer only) around trees, especially desirable fruit trees. I've seen some fruit trees such a Pear, Plum, Peach trees start dying as long as 5 years after just a slight exposure to a weed herbicide.

A non fruit tree that is very sensitive to a herbicide is a mimosa.
 

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I have never seen Poison Ivy grow like a true ivy plant... it grows multiple stalks with 3 leaves growing out of the ground. That's it. About a foot to 16" tall if it's a healthy plant. About 6-8" if it's having a rough time.

I have never seen it creep up trees like a true vine does. Seen pictures of it, but never ever saw that in real life.
And I have been dealing with it for 30 years in various locations.

Round-up is your only answer. Use 2x the strength (if you use concentrate), compared to the dilution formula they write on the bottle.
Physical cutting of stalk etc will accomplish nothing. It will spring back next year due to a ton of energy stored in the roots. You need a systemic weed killer like round-up, to kill the roots too. Like others have said, takes 3 years to "kill it off". 1st year you'll get 95% of it. Next year a few random plants here and there. 3rd year, you may see one or two max.

The roots remain potent even when dead. The active ingredient is an oil, that does not decompose very quickly. The plant does not need to be alive to be active.

Avoid burning leaves and stalks... but if you do burn it, do NOT get even a small whiff of the smoke in case there is any un-burned oil vapor in the smoke. Putting the oil into your lungs is not a good idea, for obvious reasons.

 

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A few days ago, I yanked out a poison ivy vine root and all. I was wearing work gloves but my forearm barely touched a leaf by accident. I washed the gloves well, but a tiny rash appeared on my arm a day later. This is much better than the last time I unknowingly had it touch several places on the same arm. I posted this picture two years ago. This can be nasty stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
DUDE, that's disgusting! Said Captain Obvious...

Trust me, I have it growing up an oak. The vines on the pear were much larger (diameter and height), before I pulled it all off last year.

I'll get some pics when I hit it with the weed killer (heading to the store now, so it'll be a day or two before I get to this).

Not looking forward to another rash from this stuff...

Mike
 

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I have never seen Poison Ivy grow like a true ivy plant... it grows multiple stalks with 3 leaves growing out of the ground. That's it. About a foot to 16" tall if it's a healthy plant. About 6-8" if it's having a rough time.

I have never seen it creep up trees like a true vine does. Seen pictures of it, but never ever saw that in real life.
And I have been dealing with it for 30 years in various locations.

Round-up is your only answer. Use 2x the strength (if you use concentrate), compared to the dilution formula they write on the bottle.
d, takPhysical cutting of stalk etc will accomplish nothing. It will spring back next year due to a ton of energy stored in the roots. You need a systemic weed killer like round-up, to kill the roots too. Like others have saies 3 years to "kill it off". 1st year you'll get 95% of it. Next year a few random plants here and there. 3rd year, you may see one or two max.

The roots remain potent even when dead. The active ingredient is an oil, that does not decompose very quickly. The plant does not need to be alive to be active.

Avoid burning leaves and stalks... but if you do burn it, do NOT get even a small whiff of the smoke in case there is any un-burned oil vapor in the smoke. Putting the oil into your lungs is not a good idea, for obvious reasons.

Very good info

AND it's quite common in my neck of the woods to see it as a very large vine climbing and clinging to tree bark.
 

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A few days ago, I yanked out a poison ivy vine root and all. I was wearing work gloves but my forearm barely touched a leaf by accident. I washed the gloves well, but a tiny rash appeared on my arm a day later. This is much better than the last time I unknowingly had it touch several places on the same arm. I posted this picture two years ago. This can be nasty stuff.
AND you will usually catch it much more easily or severe the next time exposed. It builds up in your system and no immunity.


and do not take a bath after being exposed to Poison Ivy use the shower. The sap oil floats on top of bath water and you will be exposed to the oil all over your body.:tango_face_sad::tango_face_sad:

Bad stuff when it gets into throat/lungs/eyes/crotch areas.:tango_face_sad::tango_face_sad:

I'm not allergic to the poison ivy/oak and when I was younger I would eat the red berries (usually while quail hunting) from sumac bushes not knowing the sumac has same sap properties as the Poison Ivy's but I've seen some very sad cases of people with the blisters. Strange that deer and goats like to eat it. Maybe that is why the red sumac berries did not bother me, I have a hard goat type head.:tango_face_wink:
 

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LEAVES OF THREE, LEAVE ME BE.

Virginia Creeper looks similar to the Ivy/Oak vine but has more than 3 leaves, usually 5 leaves and is invasive but not poison.
Leaves of five, let it thrive.


Creeper has a bright red leaf in Fall, but grows wild and will cover a fence or tree in short order. Creeper and Ivy often grow together, so you can think you're tackling the safe one and get into the other easily.

Amine 2-4-D kills Ivy (and other broadleaf plants), but not grasses. Not sure about trees.
 

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I used something from Bayer called Brush Killer. It took out the poison ivy and did not kill the grass around it. If you don’t have other vegetation around it then Roundup will work.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I used something from Bayer called Brush Killer. It took out the poison ivy and did not kill the grass around it. If you don’t have other vegetation around it then Roundup will work.
That's what I bought, because that's all Lowe's had (that specified poison ivy)...

Mike
 

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That's what I bought, because that's all Lowe's had (that specified poison ivy)...

Mike
That's what I use... Main ingredient is Triclopyr. I get the concentrate, cut the vine and with a small paintbrush paint straight concentrate on the root end of the vine. It most certainly does kill poison ivy, root and all, if done this way. I've had some long established vines growing up into trees that were 3-4 inches across. Had to cut it with a chainsaw, painted that stuff on there and they never grew back. It did not affect the trees.


I have seen poison ivy laugh at roundup spray and ask for more...
 

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If the stem is large enough, drill small (1/4" to 1/2") diameter 1" deep holes in it after cutting it. Then pour Triclopyr or roundup concentrate on top and fill the holes. Cover with a plastic bag and tie it down so no animals get into it. Wash your drill bit afterwards.

Works on trees and saplings so no suckers come up the next year. No reason it will not work on Poison Ivy. (We do not see it get that large here.)

Just don't use it on Silver Maple stumps or you will kill most if not all the Silver Maple trees in your neighbors yards also.
Silver Maple has interconnected root system. So all the trees in an area are one big organism. Poison one, you poison them all. Don't ask me how I know that.
 
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