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Anybody got any pointers on installing a inner tube on the ag fab dump carts without marking or chipping the 6in plastic rims? Besides using a tire machine? I one inner tube on but marked and chipped the heck out of the plastic rim.
 

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Go to the junk yard or mower dealers and find a set of metal rims with tires. You will be a lot happier with the rims being metal and might find ones with bearings to boot. Even check CL for old mowers/wheels.
 

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Go to the junk yard or mower dealers and find a set of metal rims with tires. You will be a lot happier with the rims being metal and might find ones with bearings to boot. Even check CL for old mowers/wheels.
They only come in 6in plastic. Theres no replacement for them in 6in for metal and 8in is too big. The 8in will rub the bottom of the dump bed. The center hole is 0.630 in diameter.
 

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My JD 50 cart has 6 inch metal front wheels and so do many other lawn pieces of equipment. Many small lawn tractors will have 6 inch front wheels. Take a wheel off your cart and go to a lawn mower repair shop and see if they have any metal wheels that will fit your needs. Roger
 

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They only come in 6in plastic. Theres no replacement for them in 6in for metal and 8in is too big. The 8in will rub the bottom of the dump bed. The center hole is 0.630 in diameter.
Go to HF, HD, lowes or hardware store with your tire/rim. I know you will find a replacement that will work for those plastic things.
 

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Go to HF, HD, lowes or hardware store with your tire/rim. I know you will find a replacement that will work for those plastic things.
Nope. Can only replace them in plastic. Riding rims are too wide. These are the same style as wheel barrel wheels except in 6in. plastic.
 

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do you have a agri supply near by if so check them out
 

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Get a longer axle and install it with the biggest tires you can afford and fit on your cart. Many garden carts are sold with tiny little tires that are nowhere near the stated weight capacity of the cart that is on top of them. Plus they easily leave ruts if you pulled them on the lawn with any amount of weight on them. I bought a cheap cart on sale at Menards for picking up gopher mounds at the neighbors lawn. I put not a lot of dirt in the bed and the bed drooped like a plastic melting in a microwave. What a cheap piece of junk that purchase was. I think the wheels on it are also plastic.
 

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I am not sure you really want help but I will try again. Doing reasearch on the Ag Fab 45-0303 cart Ag Fab says it uses a 5/8 inch axle. Harbor Freight carries the same weight carrying tires/wheels with better 5/8 inch diameter ball bearing hubs and steel wheels that bolt together. You change tubes by taking them apart with no scratching. They are 4 inch rims but that would make no difference. You can find them here http://www.harborfreight.com/4-inch-x-13-inch-white-hub-pneumatic-tire-67424.html. For under $30 you will have new tires and wheels with better bearings the are easily fixable. There are other options out there or you will have to live with scratched plastic rims that will never have a good bead seal. Roger
 

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Trying to get a tire onto a plastic rim is going to be very tricky, and success will depend on how strong the rim is. I had to re-install a non-pneumatic tire onto a metal rim, and I think that the technique may work for this as well. To do this, you will have to install the tire with a hydraulic press, using a tapered arbor to expand the tire and slide it onto the rim. You'll also need one of those tools used to fish inner tube stems through rim holes (make sure it will pass through the hole in your rim). I'll lay out the steps that I'm thinking that you will need to do.

- You will need to manufacture a tapered cone that at its small end is smaller than the unexpanded inside diameter of the tire. Its larger diameter should be equal to the OD of the rim you are trying to install the tire onto. Thickness is a judgement call. Mine was about 3" thick for a tire of similar thickness.
- You will also need to make a ring or something else that is taller than the cone above and with a larger ID than the OD of the cone. You will put a spreader board on top of this and use it to push the tire down over the cone, hence the need to be taller than the cone.
- Depending on the shape of the rim, you may also need a shaped bottom support to go underneath the rim and allow it to set on the bed of the press and take downward pressure without damage.

I made the needed cone and other stuff out of wood. The procedure would be as follows.
- Stack the bottom support (if used), rim, and cone on the base of the press. Put the tire with tube installed over the cone, and make sure the valve is located in line with the hole in the rim.
- Add the top push ring and whatever cross bar you are using to allow the press to spread out and contact the push ring, which will push the tire down over the cone.
- Use plenty of lube on the tire to make things slide freely
- Slowly add pressure with the press until the first bead slides onto the rim. Once this is done, stop.
- You will need to then attach the stem fishing tool through the hole in the rim and to the valve stem. This will probably be quite tricky, especially if the tire is narrow.
- You can then continue to press the tire until it pops over onto the rim.
- Fish the valve through the hole and then start inflating/deflating/re-inflating to seat things.

If the rim is old or weakened, you stand a good chance of breaking it in the press, but I don't know any other technique that will work for this type of installation with commonly available tools. As you found, its very easy to mar the rim using tire spoons.
 
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