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I recently got almost a quarter section (155 acres) and it is a mix of poplar trees and pasture with a few pine trees mixed in. I think it has been neglected for some time.
There are many smaller pasture areas with no trees as well as a few large open areas that are just grass. The problem is that the small areas of pasture and the edges of the large areas are starting to grow small trees and willow bushes. We have a brush cutter but it's hard to cut all the saplings when the pasture has/had a mole problem leaving 12 inch mounts of dirt and rocks everywhere.

Driving across the field is brutal in a pickup. The tractor is unbearable at any speed but SLOW.

Does anyone have any suggestions to flatten pasture? I'm not trying to totally re seed, but maybe that's nessicary? I'm thinking maybe like a large heavy piece of steel beam dragged behind my tractor? Or would a plow, disk or cultivator be needed? Any advice would be great.

Our current "solution" is to rent the feilds to a farmer who brings 25 pairs of cows all summer.
 

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I have a couple videos that don't really show the problem that well but you can probably see that it's bumpy.

This one is in the winter.

This one is the cows walking around.
 

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Depending on what you have access to, I would try to pull the brush. Cutting it is a temp solution. I don't like the idea of using a root killer around cattle and cutting it after it is dead. They do make brush grabber tools for skidsteers that could pull those, or you could attempt to pull them by chain or strap with a helper and a tractor.

As far as the mounds go, that is also according to scale. There is grass there, just not sitting flat. The best solution is to push it flat again. Land roller, homemade roller, smooth drum roller stolen from a contruction site on a Sunday morning, (not a new one, they have GPS) or even check with the township or county. Everyone used to have a roller wagon or cart, which has multiple tires on the front axle, and multiple tires on the rear axle offset to cover the gaps of the fronts. You would need a 100 hp tractor for that, minimum; they are heavy.

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As far as the brush, since there will be cattle in there, maybe invest in some Scottish/American Highland cattle. Pretty much like giant goats, and love to forage on brush & small trees.
 

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If it were me, I'd invest in a sprayer and start hitting the woods edges and brushy edges with a herbicide containing Tordon. That will kill the brush, and I believe it's registered to spray while cows are in there (but I'd recommend double checking to make sure). I'd be afraid that just brush cutting poplar sapling will just make them angry, and they will re-sprout thicker than before.

The best way to flatten it would be to plow, disc a couple times, and re-seed. If it's brushy where you are trying that, all the roots are going to make a mess. I don't know where you are located, but the governmental authorities don't look lightly on "sodbusting". You may want to have a chat with them and have your ducks in a row before proceeding. I would guess you could get a variance for pasture renovations though.

I've seen someone de-brush a pasture with the Scottish Highlanders. Quite effective actually, but they had to maintain high stocking density to force the cows to eat the trees.
 
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