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Retired MTF Admin
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I apologize for the rather large gap between posts but my incident of bouncing the camera across the shop held me up with pictures that define the process. In the meantime I’ll give you what I have and hope some of you find it interesting and not redundant.

The first few pictures show a blank test panel which is no more than two 12“ pieces of making paper with a few lengths of ¾“ tape through the centers (I‘ll explain the tape later). The other pictures show pieces final wiped with wax and grease remover, air dried and gently wiped down with a tack cloth. Some small parts are hung from a sturdy wire across the shop that will also be painted: ONE - TWO - THREE

The next pictures show an area (metal table) that I use as a mixing station. This area has been washed down with strong detergent, bleach and thoroughly dried. I put masking paper down to prevent any contaminates on or near my paint, reducers and hardeners (and of course the gun). I’ve also included the first test panel pictures where I adjust my gun and make the first pass across the paper. The gun I’m using is a Sharpe FINEX HVLP. It is an extremely well designed gun, durable and very economical ($140.) compared to industry guns that cost $300. - $500. - You do NOT have to spend $140. As there are even less expensive HVLP guns readily available. Remaining pictures show my fist tack coat pass on the hood: -FOUR - FIVE -SIX A - SIX B - SIX C

If your interests become a serious hobby you may discover just how ambidextrous you become. Long session in a spray booth (or any designated paint area) prove to be very tiring and your ’good’ arm will suffer from fatigue. For a right handed painter like me, I use my left hand very often rather than running around to the other side of parts. These next few pictures just show progress and my own technique when approaching various pieces: - SEVEN - EIGHT - NINE.

With the gun refilled I go right back to my primary target…The test panel - TEN - .
Many painters become impatient, don’t do this and shoot the parts with too much material as they try to hide or cover shadows. There is a risk when they do this as too much material in the beginning stages promote runs, orange peel and solvent entrapment (solvent POP). There is no rush, slow is smooth, smooth is efficient (fast) and that is always faster compared to a full wet coats that produce problems that often lead to wet-sand and do-over:-ELEVEN - TWELVE -

My last entry and one that probably seems repetitious. I’m trying to show a cycle (or circle pattern) in these pictures that always starts with the test panel. I have stated earlier that the ‘panel’ does certain and favorable things that keep the painter in control. Yeah, it does prevent runs but it also lets you know if and when problems like the dreaded Fish-eyes from silicone, wax or grease have somehow entered into your equation. These contaminates are most often from three sources that include aersol oils from your hose, the flow of ventilation and from your own body.

The last picture shows a full wet coat on the test panel. The ¾” tape I added is from habit. If you are doing graphics, scallops or another color for a two-tone you will be using fine line and other masking tape. Very often a painter needs to pull the tape and paper at the best and appropriate time. Too soon and the tape leaves a stringy mess that will fall back into your work AND too late and the fine line tape leaves a small, ragged saw tooth edge. If you partially pull the tape (allowing several minutes in between) on your test panel it will show the exact moment to pull all of your masking from your project - THIRTEEN

And this is where I killed my camera…

I will try for more pictures today if possible. I'll be painting the four wheels and also try out my replacement camera. The remainder of the Kubota tractor is completely assembled and I'm a little sorry for shoo'ing my wife (who took these photos) out of the shop for obvious health and hazard reasons.

As always, please feel free to ask questions, post your projects and between all of us, we should have the correct answers!

I have added a “Paint Terminology” link that has an alphabetical list. It does a very decent job explaining what abbreviations you often find on product bulletins, painters instructions, product labels and paint specific language.

The SHARPE corporation link also includes a Support column (at the left) which includes several topics from “Ask Dr Gun to Air Piping Layout” - http://www.sharpe1.com/sharpe/sharpe.nsf/Page/Paint+Terminology.

Mark
 

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Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

Mark,
A side note about the lights I have in my barn. As soon as it is warm enough
(it is 8 degrees this morning) I will take a picture of one and post it here. These were surplus lights from a store remodel that one of my brothers helped me buy. The light is close to daylight and help a lot when painting.
Dave
 

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Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

I apologize for the rather large gap between posts but my incident of bouncing the camera across the shop held me up with pictures that define the process. In the meantime I’ll give you what I have and hope some of you find it interesting and not redundant.

The first few pictures show a blank test panel which is no more than two 12“ pieces of making paper with a few lengths of ¾“ tape through the centers (I‘ll explain the tape later). The other pictures show pieces final wiped with wax and grease remover, air dried and gently wiped down with a tack cloth. Some small parts are hung from a sturdy wire across the shop that will also be painted: ONE - TWO - THREE

The next pictures show an area (metal table) that I use as a mixing station. This area has been washed down with strong detergent, bleach and thoroughly dried. I put masking paper down to prevent any contaminates on or near my paint, reducers and hardeners (and of course the gun). I’ve also included the first test panel pictures where I adjust my gun and make the first pass across the paper. The gun I’m using is a Sharpe FINEX HVLP. It is an extremely well designed gun, durable and very economical ($140.) compared to industry guns that cost $300. - $500. - You do NOT have to spend $140. As there are even less expensive HVLP guns readily available. Remaining pictures show my fist tack coat pass on the hood: -FOUR - FIVE -SIX A - SIX B - SIX C

If your interests become a serious hobby you may discover just how ambidextrous you become. Long session in a spray booth (or any designated paint area) prove to be very tiring and your ’good’ arm will suffer from fatigue. For a right handed painter like me, I use my left hand very often rather than running around to the other side of parts. These next few pictures just show progress and my own technique when approaching various pieces: - SEVEN - EIGHT - NINE.

With the gun refilled I go right back to my primary target…The test panel - TEN - .
Many painters become impatient, don’t do this and shoot the parts with too much material as they try to hide or cover shadows. There is a risk when they do this as too much material in the beginning stages promote runs, orange peel and solvent entrapment (solvent POP). There is no rush, slow is smooth, smooth is efficient (fast) and that is always faster compared to a full wet coats that produce problems that often lead to wet-sand and do-over:-ELEVEN - TWELVE -

My last entry and one that probably seems repetitious. I’m trying to show a cycle (or circle pattern) in these pictures that always starts with the test panel. I have stated earlier that the ‘panel’ does certain and favorable things that keep the painter in control. Yeah, it does prevent runs but it also lets you know if and when problems like the dreaded Fish-eyes from silicone, wax or grease have somehow entered into your equation. These contaminates are most often from three sources that include aersol oils from your hose, the flow of ventilation and from your own body.

The last picture shows a full wet coat on the test panel. The ¾” tape I added is from habit. If you are doing graphics, scallops or another color for a two-tone you will be using fine line and other masking tape. Very often a painter needs to pull the tape and paper at the best and appropriate time. Too soon and the tape leaves a stringy mess that will fall back into your work AND too late and the fine line tape leaves a small, ragged saw tooth edge. If you partially pull the tape (allowing several minutes in between) on your test panel it will show the exact moment to pull all of your masking from your project - THIRTEEN

And this is where I killed my camera…

I will try for more pictures today if possible. I'll be painting the four wheels and also try out my replacement camera. The remainder of the Kubota tractor is completely assembled and I'm a little sorry for shoo'ing my wife (who took these photos) out of the shop for obvious health and hazard reasons.

As always, please feel free to ask questions, post your projects and between all of us, we should have the correct answers!

Mark
Darn--that's what happened to Grandama's cloths-line...:biglaugh:


Sorry--Mark777--It just came out...
Seriously--I do just about the same thing...Keep up the info...
 

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Retired MTF Admin
Joined
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11,156 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

Mark,
A side note about the lights I have in my barn. As soon as it is warm enough
(it is 8 degrees this morning) I will take a picture of one and post it here. These were surplus lights from a store remodel that one of my brothers helped me buy. The light is close to daylight and help a lot when painting.
Dave
Thanks Dave.

My next decent paying customer will hopefully finance a full re-design for new lighting in my shop. I need to do something pretty soon.

Mark
 

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Retired MTF Admin
Joined
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11,156 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

Darn--that's what happened to Grandama's cloths-line...:biglaugh:


Sorry--Mark777--It just came out...
Seriously--I do just about the same thing...Keep up the info...

:sidelaugh - Sorry Grandma! :ROF


Actually, it's heavy galvanized fence wire stretched across and anchored with a ratchet strap.
 

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Just Have a Little Faith!
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Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

Just a dumb question, maybe. Back when we were kids, show car owners would brag about how many coats of paint their car had. Is more paint better?
 

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Retired MTF Admin
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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

Just a dumb question, maybe. Back when we were kids, show car owners would brag about how many coats of paint their car had. Is more paint better?
No, it isn't. The newer paints usually require a tack coat, hide coat and two full wet coats to produce a highly reflective and attractive finish that is also very durable (depending on the type of paint used).

Back in those days they used nitrocellulose lacquers and later Acrylic Lacquer. Upon completeion lacquers, as they always do, evaportate and dry to a dull or semi gloss appearance. Multiple coats applied were so solid colors and clears could be wet sanded and polished (with beautiful results). Of all the finishes available, Lacquer is the least durable. It is prone to chip and crack with age and a very high maintenance material to keep looking nice.

I recall all the ’bragging rights’ about multiple coats of lacquer, but really most of the painted finish ended up sanded away and on the shop floor. More was removed when you finished polishing with coarse, medium and fine compounds…but they were beautiful. Shops that delivered these vehicles always made an appointment for a few weeks later just to re-polish areas that cured slower and the shine that dulled needed another polishing session.
 

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Retired MTF Admin
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Discussion Starter #8
Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

I have added a “Paint Terminology” link (at the end of Part lV) that has an alphabetical list. IMO, it does an excellent job defining (alphabetically) paint terms, abbreviations and acronyms - http://www.sharpe1.com/sharpe/sharpe.nsf/Page/Paint+Terminology -. This link also includes a “Support Column” that has several topics you may find interesting and helpful.
 

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Old as Sin
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Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

mark this is great stuff . and greatly appreciated .

shd
 

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Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

Mark,
Here some pictures of the lights I have in my barn. They are not the best because it is still a little cold today. The lights are metal halide operating on 220 volts. I have 5 in the main part of the barn and 2 in the wood shop. The barn is 40x50 ft. These lights are very close to daylight in color temperature.
Light 1 shows one fixture with the lights off.
Light 2 is a light over a workbench. More about that later.
Light 3 shows how the lights are mounted in the barn.
Light 4 shows a fixture with the lights on.
Hope this will help.
 

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Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

And this is what the light looks like when you are working at the bench.
The cold and the camera gives everything a slight yellow tint.
Excuse the clutter, it has been too cold to spend a lot of time cleaning up.
Dave
P.S. Mark, If you know an eletrical contractor in your area that does store remodeling, he might be a source for that type of fixture. The ones I have came from a store remodel in Chicago where my brother was working at the time I was ready to install lights.
 

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Retired MTF Admin
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Discussion Starter #12
Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

mark this is great stuff . and greatly appreciated .

shd
Man, I'm glad you tossed tha out there! Always nice for some feedback from you gents.

btw: I can't find the little Sharpe detail gun and I think it's gone with a whole box of guns that I gave to a church.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

Thanks Dave.

How many amps are your lights pulling?

I'm a little concerned that I have not much space left in my service panel. I'm running 40 amps for the compressor and another 40 for my Millermatic MIG. The rest of my shop is wired through water tight switches and outlets as I often walk in and power wash the walls and floor. My lights, however are not water proofed :(.

Mark
 

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Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

Mark,
I really do not know how many amps the lights are pulling. I have 5 of them wired though a 40 amp breaker and I have never had it trip. I will check on the extra one I have and see if the amps are listed on it.
The panel in the barn is a 200 amp box and I am only using about half of it. The biggest draw I have is the welder. It is on a 50 amp breaker and I have never tripped it even with a rod stuck.
Dave
 

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Just Have a Little Faith!
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Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

When you paint a tractor, do you use the same paint on the frame, trans, etc.?
 

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Retired MTF Admin
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Discussion Starter #16
Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

Yes….well, almost always.

On this particular tractor I experimented by using oil base paint with hardener on the undersides of all the sheet metal and wheels. The outter sheet metal surfaces are shot with acrylic enamel because the paint has a much higher content of ultra violet screeners, much less fading over time, and should last much longer (years) from exposure to sunlight and most other elements from extreme weather conditions.

The Kubota frame and drive trane is completely painted with acrylic enamel.

Mark
 

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Re: Part lV Basic Painting Tips Tricks & Techniques

Mark,
More followup on the light fixtures. They can be wired for 110 or 220 . The amps listed on the id plate is 1.75 with either hookup. The transformer is listed as 400 watts. It was easier for me to wire them as 220 than 110 because I had already run the wire for the the lights. I did not see a mfg. name on the fixture. Hope this will help you.
Dave
 
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