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HD
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm in the process of taking apart my John Deere 318, already down to rolling frame and just the transmission and was looking for some tips on the painting process. I'm not working on a show room quality tractor, just better looking and still plan to use it and want to use JD spray paint and primer. I've been reading a lot of different threads and the stickies but do have a few clarifying questions.

On the frame and some of the components, there is surface rust that are mostly spots as well as areas just worn down to bare metal. After removing all the rust and then roughing up the rest of the paint, would need to primer. Is that where you would do a few lighter coats to fill the low spot and then sand the other areas to keep them from being built up too much?

For roughing up the painted surfaces for primer, 220 to 320 grit sand paper?

Besides a tack cloth, how else should the parts be cleaned prior priming (painting as well?)

After the primer is on, 400 grit?

Thanks for the help!
HD
 

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- Glazing putty to fill where the paint has been chipped or where the metal has been dinged. Block sand with 220 to level the surface.

- Prime and sand with 400 for the desired surface.

- Wash with reducer and then wipe with a tack cloth.

- First colour coat, otherwise known as a tack coat, apply lightly. It doesn't need to be a solid colour. A bit of primer still showing is good.

- Wait 20 minutes or so, then apply the first full colour coat. Full coverage is desired without excess paint application.

- Wait another 20 minutes or so and then apply the finish coat. Lay this coat down with multiple passes of full coverage to maintain a wet appearance over the entire surface so that the overspray at the edge of the spray pattern can blend in.

- Let it cure for several days before attaching parts.

- Do not pick bugs out of the wet paint! Let it cure, then wet sand the bugs off with 400 or higher.
 

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HD
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Discussion Starter #3
Here is some of the prep work for the brake linkages. I've gone down to bare metal in places, leaving some paint in place, but scuffing it up. Will prime with John Deere buff primer.

Some of these parts will get paint but they are going to rub that paint off over time as they are linkages. Should I take those areas off or still put primer and paint?

The primer is also a rust inhibitor, and there are some places that are pitted and have small specs of either paint or rust in them. I'll have to take metal off to get to the specks, but is it necessary? Will the primer coat take care of that?



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HD
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258 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Here are some of my primed pieces. Can still see some of the black coming through in places as most were not taken down to bare metal. Most of these parts won't be seen, just want to keep rust at bay.


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OLD TIRED CDN. MECHANIC
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Just a hint considering the time of year..... before spraying, warm up the spray cans in a bucket of hot tap water (not boiling). The paint will flow on better, set up quicker, and reduce runs.

Same thing if you get the parts to be painted, warmed up in advance.
 

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HD
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the tip. It was in the mid 70s today but still heated up the can prior to use. Seemed to flow better, but it is still a pain to paint these small parts. Did some more this evening and looks like I've gone through the can of primer as there was a bit of spitting as I was finishing up.

On a side note, how do I know when I've got enough primer on the part? Been doing two coats, first one a bit light then heavier for the second. Some of the parts are a mix of bare metal and old paint and I'm trying to leave some of the old paint peeking through while the bare metal is all primered. Since they are small parts seems like most of it gets covered.





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OLD TIRED CDN. MECHANIC
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Thanks for the tip. It was in the mid 70s today but still heated up the can prior to use. Seemed to flow better, but it is still a pain to paint these small parts. Did some more this evening and looks like I've gone through the can of primer as there was a bit of spitting as I was finishing up.

On a side note, how do I know when I've got enough primer on the part? Been doing two coats, first one a bit light then heavier for the second. Some of the parts are a mix of bare metal and old paint and I'm trying to leave some of the old paint peeking through while the bare metal is all primered. Since they are small parts seems like most of it gets covered.

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I think you are doing well. Regular paint is all about finish and shine and in many cases does not adhear well to bare metal. Hence they invented primer which is all about adhesion, not finish.

Some paints like Tremclad / Rustoleum / Armourcoat are designed to be applied right over formerly rusty metal, if you can find a color close enough to what you want.
 

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i hope it's not to late to through my 2 cents in as i was a painter for a for dealership for some years. this is all in my opinion....sand or grind metal spots with rust up to 150 grit, then 2 coats of primer should be fine, make them light to medium coats / not too heavy. cover everything, even the old paint , you don't want to take a chance there will be a reaction spraying the new paint. as larry said, the primer is for bonding only. if you are worried about grinder or sanding marks showing through, you could always apply more primer. depending on what primer you are using, it may need to be scuffed or sanded (use a red scotch-brite pad or 220 sand paper. if you are spraying an enamel, 220 grit should be fine. i totally agree with what was said before...tack off just before spraying 1st coat. don't rush it. a light coat is good. wait 15 to 20 minutes to put on your 2nd coat, making it a full coat and then apply your 3rd coat after 5 minutes.
larry had a great point about heating up the paint. in the old days we used to heat up the enamel in boiling water and with no thinner or reducer at all, just the hardener and spray one heavy coat only...HOT SPRAYING
jim from north van
 

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HD
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Discussion Starter #9
I'm still working on the project so tips are always welcome. With the colder weather here I've slowed down on painting plus lots of fall cleanup too.

Did find a local place that is a membership based facility that has all sorts of tools and workspaces. From woodworking, CNCs, lathes, welders, plasma cutters, etc... but most importantly sand blasters, and a small paint booth station.

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Rich
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I think you are doing well. Regular paint is all about finish and shine and in many cases does not adhear well to bare metal. Hence they invented primer which is all about adhesion, not finish.

Some paints like Tremclad / Rustoleum / Armourcoat are designed to be applied right over formerly rusty metal, if you can find a color close enough to what you want.
Rustoleum paints - just the Rusty Metal Primer is to coat over and stop rust. all there other colors do not.
 

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OLD TIRED CDN. MECHANIC
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Rustoleum paints - just the Rusty Metal Primer is to coat over and stop rust. all there other colors do not.
We have had good luck using the colors "as advertised", right over rusty metal. Well, power washed first, to loosen and blow any flakes off, and then left a day to dry. The primer is apparently built in.

Just bought another quart of Tremclad black yesterday and did some rusty snow tire rims. But boy, that "quart?" seems to be getting shorter all the time. :hide:

https://www.rustoleum.ca/product-catalog/consumer-brands/tremclad/rust-paint/rust-paint

.
 

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HD
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Discussion Starter #12
After quite a break, finally getting back to my project. I'm working on thre frame and in places I've gone down to bare metal, and in others I've just deglossed with 220 sandpaper as well as knocked off any rust.

On my first coat of John Deere Buff primer, all the areas that were bare metal are all primered now, but much of the painted areas have just a touch of primer. Should I do another coat of primer and get a uniform layer down?

Previous stuff I've read said the old paint if it is in good condition to degloss and paint right over.

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