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I just got through doing my 900 with rattle cans. It came out surprisingly good. My father just got a compressor and paint sprayer, so that will be how I do my next project ( which will probably be one of my large frames).

Jason
 

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It took 3 or 4 cans of rustoleum gloss almond, 2 cans of gloss leather brown, and 1 can of regal red. I did several light coats.

Jason
 

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I've used rattle cans for all of my projects. Roughly 5 bucks a can(Rustoleum), 6-7 cans, that includes primer. 1 coat of primer, 2 light coats to finish. Like Jason, I've got access to a cup gun/sprayer now, I'd like to learn how to mix, use hardeners, clear coats etc.. Thinking about picking up a book.

I used a mounted wire wheel and a drill with a wire wheel on it to sand the parts, degreased with simple green and primed. That method works best for me. The cool part is, if I ever decide to re-coat with a better paint all I have to do is disassemble certain areas, re-hang and mask the rest to shoot. Good body work is the key: I've seen guys use good quality(mixed) paint but slacked off on the body/prep work and even from 20 feet away, still looks sloppy. That always makes me chuckle when people like that say, "you used spray paint"? :fing32:
 

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I too used spray cans but the trick is to make sure that everything is spotlessly clean and oil free even your finger prints will ruin a paint job.
 

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Guy's, as a painting professional of 27 years, let impart some experience.
Painting with a cup gun (gravity or siphon) will always result in a better result. I use 6 guns, each set-up for different paint technologies, but that is an expensive road to go down for just a few times use. Get yourselves a good gun, Binks or DeVilbiss (I prefer Devilbiss) and a gun cleaning kit. The final job will always reflect the cleanlyness of your equipment. On to paint, many choices are available, enamals, urathanes, epoxies. My choice is epoxy primer followed by high build surfacer, block sand and sand again. Topcoat with a good enamal (I like PPG and Dupont). If you want to use a two component (ie hardner) be sure to have the proper respirator. Many of the hardners have Isocyanurate as the base of the formula, and I can not stress enough, you do not want to inhale this stuff, it can catalize in the lungs and kill you (10,000 Bopal Indians found that out with the leak at a Union Carbide plant many years ago). OSHA recomends a class D air supply respirator for applying this (I Have and it ain't cheap). I reccomend that you can get excellent results using a "single pack" enamal that you will be proud of, a always ask questions of your paint supplier if you are unsure of an application. Anyone can contact me for advise anytime, I give it for free, and I promise if I can't answer it, I have resources in the industry that I can access. Keep it safe. Sorry if this sounds like preaching.
 

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Excellent advice on the potential hazards of painting. A word to the wise should be sufficient.
 

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Guy's, as a painting professional of 27 years, let impart some experience.
Painting with a cup gun (gravity or siphon) will always result in a better result. I use 6 guns, each set-up for different paint technologies, but that is an expensive road to go down for just a few times use. Get yourselves a good gun, Binks or DeVilbiss (I prefer Devilbiss) and a gun cleaning kit. The final job will always reflect the cleanlyness of your equipment. On to paint, many choices are available, enamals, urathanes, epoxies. My choice is epoxy primer followed by high build surfacer, block sand and sand again. Topcoat with a good enamal (I like PPG and Dupont). If you want to use a two component (ie hardner) be sure to have the proper respirator. Many of the hardners have Isocyanurate as the base of the formula, and I can not stress enough, you do not want to inhale this stuff, it can catalize in the lungs and kill you (10,000 Bopal Indians found that out with the leak at a Union Carbide plant many years ago). OSHA recomends a class D air supply respirator for applying this (I Have and it ain't cheap). I reccomend that you can get excellent results using a "single pack" enamal that you will be proud of, a always ask questions of your paint supplier if you are unsure of an application. Anyone can contact me for advise anytime, I give it for free, and I promise if I can't answer it, I have resources in the industry that I can access. Keep it safe. Sorry if this sounds like preaching.
Sounds more like a generous offer of your expertise than preaching to me.

I've learned one important fact about my painting abilities. The projects always come out really nice when I have someone like you do it for me.

Mike
 

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Guy's, as a painting professional of 27 years, let impart some experience.
Painting with a cup gun (gravity or siphon) will always result in a better result. I use 6 guns, each set-up for different paint technologies, but that is an expensive road to go down for just a few times use. Get yourselves a good gun, Binks or DeVilbiss (I prefer Devilbiss) and a gun cleaning kit. The final job will always reflect the cleanlyness of your equipment. On to paint, many choices are available, enamals, urathanes, epoxies. My choice is epoxy primer followed by high build surfacer, block sand and sand again. Topcoat with a good enamal (I like PPG and Dupont). If you want to use a two component (ie hardner) be sure to have the proper respirator. Many of the hardners have Isocyanurate as the base of the formula, and I can not stress enough, you do not want to inhale this stuff, it can catalize in the lungs and kill you (10,000 Bopal Indians found that out with the leak at a Union Carbide plant many years ago). OSHA recomends a class D air supply respirator for applying this (I Have and it ain't cheap). I reccomend that you can get excellent results using a "single pack" enamal that you will be proud of, a always ask questions of your paint supplier if you are unsure of an application. Anyone can contact me for advise anytime, I give it for free, and I promise if I can't answer it, I have resources in the industry that I can access. Keep it safe. Sorry if this sounds like preaching.
Well put. I bought a DeVilbiss two gun kit from Eastwood. I use one for priming and one for painting. Great for the money and easy to use. They don't take that big of a compresser either when painting GT's. They turn out nice. One thing that I have noticed is the the key for lasting and looking good is using a good Wax/Grease remover before.
 

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Guy's, as a painting professional of 27 years, ....
Painting with a cup gun (gravity or siphon) will always result in a better result. ....I use 6 guns, each set-up for different paint technologies, but that is an expensive road to go down for just a few times use. Get yourselves a good gun, Binks or DeVilbiss (I prefer Devilbiss) and a gun cleaning kit. ...
Mbenard, if you are speaking of High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) spray guns, I agree they do a fantastic job, but I think you should mention the size of the air compressor you have.

I would love to use HVLP spray guns but I have been stopped because the compressors must have a large cubic feet per minute (cfm) output, and it seems a sufficient oil-lubed compressor will cost over $500. Craigslist has not shown sufficiently sized compressors for much less. With that large a compressor I could also run a media blaster.

A very decent gravity feed gun can be had for $150 to $200, but put it all together and it is quite an initial investment for painting one tractor. It might make sense if I use it for 5 or 6 tractors, but that is still about $100 per tractor.
 

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I have a 7 HP compressor with an 80 gallon tank. I also have a HVLP made by Binks that uses standard air supplies, but it does use a lot of air and even my compressor has a problem keeping up on large spraying projects. I don't use it much, if I have something large that I absolutely want to spray with HVLP, I go back to the lab at the office where we have a proper HVLP system (to pricey for an occasional user). Mostly I use my DeVillbiss JGA guns to paint at home, and the compressor does a fine job. But you are right, compressors do make a difference and I wouldnt' use anything less than a 2 HP with a 20 gallon tank. And don't forget to use a desicant type air filter and have a dedicated hose for painting only (one that you use for air tools can become contaminated with oil - unless you are going for a mottled finish!)
 

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Horsepower don't make the cfm's come out right. Just how many cfm's is that 7 HP producing at 90 PSI?
 

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A 7hp compressor is a beautiful thing. I am guessing it is running at 220 volts. Installing a 220v line to the garage might cost a bit. i wish I could do that.

If anyone wants to investigate HVLP, this site has balanced information. http://www.spraygunworld.com/ They will sell you reasonably priced guns or really fancy ones. They also have lots of help on choosing spray guns and compressors.

Here is their information on sizing compressors:
http://www.spraygunworld.com/Information2/CFM.htm
It has a lot information, and much of it is interrelated and depends on your choice of spray gun, so I won't quote parts out of context. You might get the idea I suggested a particular machine then found it to be inadequate.
 

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You are right HP does not equate to CFM, but more HP equates to a bigger compressor unit equating into more CFM. Mine does 26CFM @ 90PSI (I had to go out and check the tag). Yes I have 220VAC in my shop, I had a 100amp service installed after I moved in. Besides the restoration work I do (MG's(14), Jag's(1), Buicks(2) and anything else I find that would be fun, like 1700H), I also do finish carpentry, which means I have a lot of powerfull tools to power. I am presently building new cabinets for the kitchen. And let me state for the record, the Binks HVLP I have is a good product but I didn't like the results I attained with it (Urethane clear wood finish) so I never used it again, it sits in the cabinet collecting dust.
 

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I have a 7 HP compressor with an 80 gallon tank. I also have a HVLP made by Binks that uses standard air supplies, but it does use a lot of air and even my compressor has a problem keeping up on large spraying projects. I don't use it much, if I have something large that I absolutely want to spray with HVLP, I go back to the lab at the office where we have a proper HVLP system (to pricey for an occasional user). Mostly I use my DeVillbiss JGA guns to paint at home, and the compressor does a fine job. But you are right, compressors do make a difference and I wouldnt' use anything less than a 2 HP with a 20 gallon tank. And don't forget to use a desicant type air filter and have a dedicated hose for painting only (one that you use for air tools can become contaminated with oil - unless you are going for a mottled finish!)
Excellent advise in this thread !!
For me, painting a garden tractor would be like restoring an old car or truck (done some vehicles complete):

- remove all tractor paint with "Circa 1850" furniture stripper (best I've used - available at TSC) / product video below:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJhS93rio_0
- go over all sheet metal with 80 grit on a 6 inch. diameter D/A sander (uses lots of air / got a 2 stage compressor now, after blowing up my 3HP one)
- sandblast any remaining rust spots & wipe on/off with muradic acid (cleans pits)
- light prime with vinyl wash zinc chromate, to prevent future rust
- seal prime with epoxy (2-3 coats)
- fill prime with urethane high-build (2-3 coats)
- sand in progression, from coarser dry and finish up with 400 wet paper
- top coat with urethane paint, UAP / NAPA brand (decent price & quality, I've had good results with)

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Beaumont { :>)) www.petperfectexpress.com
Golden Rule - "he who has the gold, makes the rule"

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http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=135888 http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=136600&page=3
1992 JD 318 original paint w/484 hr. on P218g Onan & #49 snow blower / 1998 JD GT262 w/brand new Kawasaki OHV & 48" rebuilt deck
http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=135838
 

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Beaumont, I see in your sig you have some interesting projects to work on.

The first one looks to be in great shape except for some rust on the lower struts. What kind of finish are you going to use on the dog? :ROF
 

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do not forget to use a good resperator even when using rattle cans- that good restoration paint- about 7-8 bucks a can- is pretty volitale- especially be careful if you are using paint strippers-- i did`nt once and it was like sucking air through a straw for a month- had the wrong type resporator- my 2 cents-- after i get all the steel prepped and ready to prime- i.e. blast-sand-or stripped- i wash with warm water and DAWN DISHWASHING SOAP- best degreaser out their
 
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