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Discussion Starter #1
Just got my 9.50 x 16 R1 off the rim and being that it had a tube in it filled with anti freeze when it got punctured it had leaked and some rust and pitting had occurred. It was strange to me that the tube was completely in the tire including the valve stem and the rim still had the tubeless valve stem.
Any ways I cleaned all the surface with a wire Brush grinder and am wanting to Paint the inside to help protect it , I will be reinstalling a tube and fluid in the tire , but want to make sure if paint where the bead seals is a good idea or not.

Any comments?
 

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Can
t see where it would hurt. They are painted when new. I'd make sure the paint was good and dry before mounting tires. If not they may be **** to break off the rim down the road some day
 

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I very carefully painted the inside of the rims and the tire installer scratched off great swaths of paint to bare metal. Not really his fault, the replacement cheap tire was extremely difficult to mount even with a machine. The better Carlisle tire was very easy to mount. Nest time I order Carlisle, even through the mail.

My hypothesis is, if the fluid has rusted the inside of the rims then all the available oxygen has been consumed and no further oxidation will occur. If more oxygen is introduced by occasional top-offs, then the rims may rust a bit more.

Inherently corrosive materials like calcium chloride will continue to corrode the rims.

Modern auto engine antifreeze had additives to reduce corrosion of both ferrous and aluminum passages. Simple windshield washer fluid of mostly an alcohol water mix is cheap because it does not have these corrosion additives.

I will choose to fill with RV antifreeze to -50 degrees. It is mostly alcohol and water, with a little bit of very expensive but non-toxic propylene glycol. Ethylene glycol is much, much less expensive but it the one that is toxic to my pets and other mammals.
 

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If the inside of the rim is rusty, my opinion would be to give it a good paint job. Paint will not interfere with the bead seals.

I'm puzzled about how/why you still had the tubeless valve stem but had a tube in the tire? What do you think was going on there? :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well I Think the idea was they filled the tube up with anti freeze and then stuffed it in side and then filled The tire with air? Only thing I could come up with. The tube still has fluid in it but with the rip in it most was inside the tire cavity. Im going to have a tire store fix the cut in the center of the tire With a boot patch. (it has been done once before) And go ahead and patch where they used tire plugs.(probably when they popped the tube) Then install a new tube and put fluid back in it, I really dont want chloride and will suggest Rv anti freeze as it gets cold here, These tires and rims were bought used and are used but not used up and I hope to get another year or so out of them. Lot of work to go through to get the R1 tires on my 855 instead of the worthless turf tires that are on it now. By the way the inside of the rim is now painted up and looks nice and new. I will wait to do the outsides untill Im ready to mount them on the tractor.
 

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Well I Think the idea was they filled the tube up with anti freeze and then stuffed it in side and then filled The tire with air? Only thing I could come up with. The tube still has fluid in it but with the rip in it most was inside the tire cavity. Im going to have a tire store fix the cut in the center of the tire With a boot patch. (it has been done once before) And go ahead and patch where they used tire plugs.(probably when they popped the tube) Then install a new tube and put fluid back in it, I really dont want chloride and will suggest Rv anti freeze as it gets cold here, These tires and rims were bought used and are used but not used up and I hope to get another year or so out of them. Lot of work to go through to get the R1 tires on my 855 instead of the worthless turf tires that are on it now. By the way the inside of the rim is now painted up and looks nice and new. I will wait to do the outsides untill Im ready to mount them on the tractor.
That is the only thing I could figure out, as well. Not the way I would have done it, but...

How much extra weight do you figure you will get by loading those tires?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That is the only thing I could figure out, as well. Not the way I would have done it, but...

How much extra weight do you figure you will get by loading those tires?
The other one, just guessing weighs about 100lbs, but I will take it to work and weigh it so I can get the other one close.
 

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I sandblasted, primed, & painted my trailer rims inside and out. The bead area and valve stem hole is painted from the factory, so I figured why not. The tire guy scratched up the bead area a little but I just deflated the tire, masked the bead and touched it up. Seven months later, so far so good, no leaks.
 

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You can paint them and if you have a small heater put them in a box and heat dry the rims outside and make sure the box doesn't catch on fire. This way you get a good baked on job and the solvents are all evaporated out of the paint. If you want to get a real good job use epoxy 2 part paint , this is very hard surface type paint and stands up in harsh inviroments. take the old tube and cut it to make a liner to mount the new ones on the rim and slide it out when you air the tire up.
 

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Paint is way better than bare steel, in fact, bare steel will rust and tend to give you more leaks. I will sandblast a rim and prime it all up. Then I paint the inside of the wheels and mount the tires. Then the rims get sanded to fix any scratched paint, and a light sanding on the outside. Now the tires are masked off and any bare metal re-primed. Now the rims are ready for paint. IMHO, you are never going to paint rims and then mount tires without scratching or marring them. Painting them once the tires are mounted is the way to go. Fresh paint on the inside and fully painted with the tires not inflated will win every time.

Once painted and dried, the tires can be aired up. If you are mounting tubeless tires, slip a small piece of twine through the hole in the rim and fish it out of the bead. Now with the valve stem removed, slip the twine through the valve stem and place a large knot on the end. Now you can just pop the valve stem into the tire and pull it into the rim nice and easy.
 

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Yep paint them up! It's the only way to go. Mine are brush painted and run tubeless and no leaks at all. Bead sealing is fine. Rubber tires are pretty flexible and conformable.

Mine looked like this before painting.


And after.


After breaking down several of my tractor rims latley. Some with tubes some without. I'm now convinced that tubes tend to cause the rims to rust. I feel that moisture from mounting and that get in through valve stem hole ect gets caught between the tube and the rim where it can't evaporate and causes rust. All the rims with tubes had mre rust than the ones run tubeless.
 

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Tubes can rub paint off over time.I use talc(AKA baby powder) if I use tubes.Just sprinkle some around the inside of the tire and rub the tube down.Helps a little when mounting the tire.This doesn't stop the paint rub,just slows it down some.Really helps with tire to tube chafe.
 
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