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I think something like this Ryobi battery powered riding mower will be the replacement whenever my old Sears gives up the ghost. I’m going to keep an eye on this product line but hoping to hear feedback from actual owners.



https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-38-in-100-Ah-Battery-Electric-Rear-Engine-Riding-Lawn-Mower-RY48111/300422546

The online reviews seem very positive. One thing I read is that the cutting deck simply hangs from the brackets which allows it to move. I saw a picture that seems to confirm that. I can fix it myself, wondering what other perceived shortcomings folks have encountered.
 

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I'd never buy an EV for property maintenance. My GT runs at least 3 hours per cutting in the fall, most of that under pretty good load. Damp, long grass, plenty of leaves, pulling a Cyclone Rake.

Be sure of what you are getting. Look at the various battery drills/impact wrenches. Some are just for very light duty while others more robust. Gotta think these are more light than heavy duty. Extra battery? Cost? Repairs?

My bottom line is that whatever it is, it has to WORK, RELIABLY.

Added thought: Keep in mind that to extend battery range, everything in the construction has to be as light weight as possible. That means thinnest possible gauge metals, and plastics where ever possible.

Not bashing EVs here, just be sure you know what you are getting and that it will meet your needs. Otherwise it quickly becomes just more land fill or something for the kids to play on.
 

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Sorry if I offended you, with some cautionary thoughts. It certainly wasn't intentional.
 

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I'd never buy an EV for property maintenance. My GT runs at least 3 hours per cutting in the fall, most of that under pretty good load. Damp, long grass, plenty of leaves, pulling a Cyclone Rake.

Be sure of what you are getting. Look at the various battery drills/impact wrenches. Some are just for very light duty while others more robust. Gotta think these are more light than heavy duty. Extra battery? Cost? Repairs?

My bottom line is that whatever it is, it has to WORK, RELIABLY.

Added thought: Keep in mind that to extend battery range, everything in the construction has to be as light weight as possible. That means thinnest possible gauge metals, and plastics where ever possible.

Not bashing EVs here, just be sure you know what you are getting and that it will meet your needs. Otherwise it quickly becomes just more land fill or something for the kids to play on.

Very good response on items to look for and possible shortcomings. I would also wonder on reliability of electrical contacts/brushes/etc in a harsh environment.
 

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Battery and electronics technologies have been evolving exponentially over the past several years, and even though one might not have experience on this particular machine it seems to me that observations based on experience with related electrical systems could offer useful insight.

Let's not forget that we're here to help each other; just because that help doesn't come in your favorite color or shape doesn't mean it's not valuable or well-intentioned.

Steady on.
 

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This may be something of a tangent, but might help:

Something like three years ago, I was on Church Council and we needed yet another lawn mower. The lawns would periodically kill the mowers, and I figured out why with the help of the members here - the side hills were killing the gas engines. There were several of them where you'd have to mow on a tilt, and we figured out that the engines were getting starved for oil.

It cost plenty, but we had a Stihl dealer two blocks away who gave us a break on the pricing of a Stihl battery mower. It has a kind of 'brain' so that it knows when to work the motor harder, jumping to high output instantly. Everyone reports that it does a great job, actually outworks the volunteers pushing it. Everybody says it really doesn't care about wet grass, although like any mower, it does a better job on dry grass. Best thing is that it's lasting - we were having to buy a 'new' mower every year and a half or so. And some of the 'donations' were, well, real beaters: "So-and-so donated a mower!" "That's great!" (Figure on replacing it in a few months.)

Thing is, that battery mower has paid us back well in maintenance not required, ease-of-use, and durability. All the arguments about it costing one and a half times a hardware-store mower have been completely shut down because it's still going, where we would be on the third hardware-store mower by now.

Hope that helps...
 
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