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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All, my 1977 335 Industrial has been overheating. It was low on coolant, I refilled it with the premixed stuff that is supposed to work with any previous coolant. It is still overheating. The water temp gauge is not in the red though. I hear gurgling after I shut off the engine. I took a video:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/kJNtMwGhy76Szzv46

Things I can think of

- Bad coolant? (Flush the all the coolant and refill?)
- Bad pump? (How do I test this?)
- Water leaking? (I did not check the water level afterwards, but I doubt this is it.)
- Fan not working? (Did not check, but then the coolant temp should have gone in red...the gauge does move to the middle, so it is not dead.)


Any other ideas?
 

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Thermostat?
Bad water pump would have water leaking out from a weep hole ...also COULD be making noise...whining or the bearings kind of rattling around
What color is the coolant now?..if it is badly rust colored that could be a problem
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have not drained any of the coolant yet to see what color.

I don't hear much rattling/whining, so I don't think it is the pump then.
The thermostat - I thought it is probably not the culprit, because it the gauge does move from cool to warm. Never gets into red though.
 

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does the motor oil look like foamy chocolate milk? and/or is the oil level going up?
 

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Look on the surface of the coolant in the radiator for an oil "sheen".
If you have a blown head gasket, which will seriously raise coolant temperature, "combustion products" will likely show in the coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Look on the surface of the coolant in the radiator for an oil "sheen".
If you have a blown head gasket, which will seriously raise coolant temperature, "combustion products" will likely show in the coolant.
Will have to check when I am back by the tractor. Sure hope it is not the gaskets!
 

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Easy way to check for a blown head gasket or cracked head is to watch in the radiator for a steady flow of bubbles but I really doubt that is your problem. Most likely you have a sticky thermostat or bad water pump. When looking into the radiator you should see a steady flow and substantial after it has warmed up. I had a water pump several years ago that the impeller was worn almost smooth but it never leaked a drop and of course the only way to check for that is to remove the water pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Easy way to check for a blown head gasket or cracked head is to watch in the radiator for a steady flow of bubbles but I really doubt that is your problem. Most likely you have a sticky thermostat or bad water pump. When looking into the radiator you should see a steady flow and substantial after it has warmed up. I had a water pump several years ago that the impeller was worn almost smooth but it never leaked a drop and of course the only way to check for that is to remove the water pump.
Not sure what substiantial flow looks like, but I will check it. I did have an overheat before when water was really low or gone (so I must have at least a slow leak somewhere), could that have damaged the water pump?

Is the gurgling sound after the engine is shut off any clue on what might be going on?
 

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I have not drained any of the coolant yet to see what color.

I don't hear much rattling/whining, so I don't think it is the pump then.
The thermostat - I thought it is probably not the culprit, because it the gauge does move from cool to warm. Never gets into red though.
The video is showing some steam coming off and I can only faintly hear some background noise ...possibly the gurgling to which you referred...that would be boiling water...the gauge is supposed to go into the red zone and warn you that it is getting that hot...unless the coolant level is so low that it is not even covering the sensor.....so the gauge is not accurate at all it seems........so something is causing it to overheat...the reason I asked about the color of the coolant is because if it is really rusty, the core of the radiator could be plugged with rust preventing the coolant from circulating and getting cooled off
other guys are referring to the possibility of oil making it way into the cooling system because of some damage to the engine or gaskets...start simple...remove the thermostat and throw it in a pot of boiling water and see if it opens all the way...if the thermostat is the problem and you cannot get your hands on one right away, you can run without it...engine will just run cool...not effficiently
Let us know how you make out...good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, there was a lot of steam...the gauge moved, so that threw me off, but what you are speculating makes good sense, so I will check. Might be a week or two before I figure out how take the thermostat out. Not sure how easy it is to get to.
 

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Perhaps you have an air pocket at the pump.
 

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Yes, there was a lot of steam...the gauge moved, so that threw me off, but what you are speculating makes good sense, so I will check. Might be a week or two before I figure out how take the thermostat out. Not sure how easy it is to get to.
Follow the hose at the top of the radiator to where a hose clamp is holding the other end to a piece that will have 2 bolts holding it to the engine...take the bolts out...pull the piece up..it may be stuck a little but it should not take much effort...the thermostat will be right there when you take off the piece with the hose....make sure that the engine has not been running and that the engine is cold before you do this or you will get burned
...good luck
 

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beeffarmer,

You might be aware of this, but just in case, - - if you do remove the thermostat housing to get to the thermostat, be sure to look at how the thermostat is installed in the block. The spring-like part of the thermostat has to be down in the block so that the hot water will cause it to open. It is possible to install it upside down and if that occurs, the thermostat will never open, hence, the engine will overheat for sure.

How do I know that? Uh, BTDT.

Tom in TN
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Follow the hose at the top of the radiator to where a hose clamp is holding the other end to a piece that will have 2 bolts holding it to the engine...take the bolts out...pull the piece up..it may be stuck a little but it should not take much effort...the thermostat will be right there when you take off the piece with the hose....make sure that the engine has not been running and that the engine is cold before you do this or you will get burned
...good luck
Never took a thermostat out before, so thanks for the detailed steps, I will check this next week!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
beeffarmer,

You might be aware of this, but just in case, - - if you do remove the thermostat housing to get to the thermostat, be sure to look at how the thermostat is installed in the block. The spring-like part of the thermostat has to be down in the block so that the hot water will cause it to open. It is possible to install it upside down and if that occurs, the thermostat will never open, hence, the engine will overheat for sure.

How do I know that? Uh, BTDT.

Tom in TN
I am glad you chimed in!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well, I found one problem...the belt came off the fan pulley, so the fan even though was spinning, it was not spinning enough, so the coolant boiled and evaporated (my coolant level is def low again). So first I will put the belt back and see what happens. Still not sure why the temp gauge would not be deep in the red if the coolant is boiling...so the thermostat may still be at play.

Will keep you posted!
 

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How full are you filling the radiator? If you fill it all of the way up to the bottom of the filler neck then it's going to spit out coolant like it's boiling over without actually overheating the engine. The coolant will be hot and you will see steam vapors, but it will not actually be boiling hot. You should only fill it so that the level is an inch or so above the core inside the top of the radiator. That allows for normal expansion up to normal operating temperature without it spitting any coolant out.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
How full are you filling the radiator? If you fill it all of the way up to the bottom of the filler neck then it's going to spit out coolant like it's boiling over without actually overheating the engine. The coolant will be hot and you will see steam vapors, but it will not actually be boiling hot. You should only fill it so that the level is an inch or so above the core inside the top of the radiator. That allows for normal expansion up to normal operating temperature without it spitting any coolant out.
I filled it just to cover the core...but now it does not even reach the core so it I think it was boiling...or having a leak..or both.
 
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