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Wanted to share a little video of feeding our livestock produce. We give this to cows, chickens, pigs, etc. Our source is almost 100% all natural organic. Does this mean we have almost all natural organic livestock?

 

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(getting up on my soap box)

Ain't no such thing as organic livestock or produce. Sorry, just ain't possible to prove a genetic history of organic, no artificial fertilizer ( although possible ) and no artificial propagation.

As I watch the bike riders appearance on our street since the dry land farm was converted to $600K mini mcmansions, I am reminded that all gentrification is local, like politics. I know, off topic, but still...

The concept of Organic food and "close to the earth" lifestyle is a marketing plan to sell stuff. Sure, your kale doesn't have DDT sprayed on it but it's Joe Friday's thirteenth generation purple leaved frilly kale...

( stepping off the soap box) ( for those readers who don't know what a soap box is...google it )

There are several accepted organizations that certify organic food. You pass their test and pay them money. That's how you prove your product is organic or grass fed or hydroponically grown.

Thanks for the opportunity to vent.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
(getting up on my soap box)

Ain't no such thing as organic livestock or produce. Sorry, just ain't possible to prove a genetic history of organic, no artificial fertilizer ( although possible ) and no artificial propagation.

As I watch the bike riders appearance on our street since the dry land farm was converted to $600K mini mcmansions, I am reminded that all gentrification is local, like politics. I know, off topic, but still...

The concept of Organic food and "close to the earth" lifestyle is a marketing plan to sell stuff. Sure, your kale doesn't have DDT sprayed on it but it's Joe Friday's thirteenth generation purple leaved frilly kale...

( stepping off the soap box) ( for those readers who don't know what a soap box is...google it )

There are several accepted organizations that certify organic food. You pass their test and pay them money. That's how you prove your product is organic or grass fed or hydroponically grown.

Thanks for the opportunity to vent.
Vent anytime on any of my threads or posts. :tango_face_grin:

I think organic is a word, but I believe the government has made it to where they can for sure make some money with that word.
 

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Do you get the produce when it's too old for human consumption or do you buy it for your animals instead of standard livestock feeds?

I don't really get this whole organic thing anyway. I mean if the livestock free grazes like they always used to, and no fertilizer or pesticides are put down, isn't the hay truly organic? I mean if they eat hay and corn like my grandfather used to do, then they must be organic, right?
 

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Do you get the produce when it's too old for human consumption or do you buy it for your animals instead of standard livestock feeds?

I don't really get this whole organic thing anyway. I mean if the livestock free grazes like they always used to, and no fertilizer or pesticides are put down, isn't the hay truly organic? I mean if they eat hay and corn like my grandfather used to do, then they must be organic, right?
Yes when we get it the people giving it to us believe that it is not good enough to sit on their shelves and be sold. I believe most of the stuff is still good when we get it. Just look at the video. Of course we will not consume it because if someone finds out or sees it then their could be a huge uproar.

Organic. It is what you want it to be. Not everything they say is GMO free had gmo to begin with. Yes it is GMO free, but it never had it. Not true in all cases. They use it as big advertising. Now back to organic. If you look up organic it more less means something living. Natural would be more of a word people should use, but we dont. I like to use grass fed, farm raised, free range, etc. Now even the big guys are slinging the word organic to their benefit so I dont buy something just because it says organic.

You brought up another good one about grazing. Just because it is grass fed doesnt mean the grass didnt have fertilizer and weed killer on it. To have a beautiful field with no weeds and grass just growing laying on top of itself without fertilizer and weed killer is extremely hard to do and is not an over night job. Takes years. They say 3 to 7 years to kill all the weeds, but if your neighbor is not controlling his the seeds will blow right over to yours. I have had weeds disappear and think I got them!!! Come to find out we did nothing, but go into a drought and they went dormant. Couple years later we get good rain and they are back.

Anyways organic is just a money word now. I use it because some people pay attention when you say it and now it is supposed to mean free of all the bad stuff.

Hope this helped..........Or at least gave you something else to think about.
 

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I could tell the produce looked great. Maybe a few spots here and there, but that's how it looks straight off the trees before it gets harvested and waxed with some Turtle Wax. My grandparents had apple trees on their property and not one looked as good as you could get in the store but they tasted much better.

One more thing I just thought about the grazing. If you are doing organic and your neighbor isn't but his rain runoff runs to your property, no amount of organic anything will keep your ground organic. The catch phrase used to be free range, now it's organic. We will see what comes next! I'm all for farmers using whatever catch phrase earns them more money. They still work for their money while some of the others ~cough~ professional athletes ~cough~ make a lot more and do a lot less. The life of a farmer has never attracted masses, but for the select few that choose it have the clearest view of life.

I'd be interested to see how the meat tastes when they are free grazing and eating produce. That sounds like a well rounded diet!
 

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I could tell the produce looked great. Maybe a few spots here and there, but that's how it looks straight off the trees before it gets harvested and waxed with some Turtle Wax. My grandparents had apple trees on their property and not one looked as good as you could get in the store but they tasted much better.

One more thing I just thought about the grazing. If you are doing organic and your neighbor isn't but his rain runoff runs to your property, no amount of organic anything will keep your ground organic. The catch phrase used to be free range, now it's organic. We will see what comes next! I'm all for farmers using whatever catch phrase earns them more money. They still work for their money while some of the others ~cough~ professional athletes ~cough~ make a lot more and do a lot less. The life of a farmer has never attracted masses, but for the select few that choose it have the clearest view of life.

I'd be interested to see how the meat tastes when they are free grazing and eating produce. That sounds like a well rounded diet!
Turtle Wax :sidelaugh You are correct about what they do to make it look good. Have you heard of the carbon monoxide to make the red in the meat last longer or something of that sort?

Yes. Run off from your neighbors will get to your property and do something whether it is good or bad. Like bees. Organic honey I think not. Not impossible, but the odds of are slim. Bees travel up to about 2 miles. So everything in a 2 mile radius would have to be organic, natural, pasture, free range or whatever.

Athletes get paid entirely to much.

Meat on our farm taste so good make you wanna slap somebody!!! :Stop:
 

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We grow some vege's for sale and some apples. We keep the amount of spraying down as much as you can on apples. No spray on vege's. When we sell the apples, people want the ones on the tree, like the perfect spayed ones in the store. You can stay spray if you are organic. Look it up. We have locals who love our apples and many use them for cider. We are lucky. We are not Organic, we are just careful. Tomato's are another story. Organic is at best questionable to us on beef, chicken, and such. Have a great day.

There is a pig farmer in the area, he sells Hampshire Pigs. To make this short, buy the time he gets it slaughtered and wrapped for the freezer the customer is paying $7.60 a pound. Slaughter is $233 alone at a USDA facility. It is high end pork sent to NY City sometimes. The customers buy before he even starts the growing process. He has only had one customer back out after paying for personal reasons and he gave them the money back. He is certified, but the price is high.

Gary
 

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We grow some vege's for sale and some apples. We keep the amount of spraying down as much as you can on apples. No spray on vege's. When we sell the apples, people want the ones on the tree, like the perfect spayed ones in the store. You can stay spray if you are organic. Look it up. We have locals who love our apples and many use them for cider. We are lucky. We are not Organic, we are just careful. Tomato's are another story. Organic is at best questionable to us on beef, chicken, and such. Have a great day.

There is a pig farmer in the area, he sells Hampshire Pigs. To make this short, buy the time he gets it slaughtered and wrapped for the freezer the customer is paying $7.60 a pound. Slaughter is $233 alone at a USDA facility. It is high end pork sent to NY City sometimes. The customers buy before he even starts the growing process. He has only had one customer back out after paying for personal reasons and he gave them the money back. He is certified, but the price is high.

Gary
Awesome pig story. The breed we raise are heritage and take 2-3 times the amount of time to grow out, but we dont put a quarter of the feed in them either. Problem with the slow growth rate we would have to be up to our arm pits in pigs to supply such a thing. We will stand here and say that our American Guinea Hogs are the best pork I have ever ate in my life. I dont believe I am being bias either.

Here is an older video from 2015 of one of the sows with a new born litter.
 

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Organic. It is what you want it to be. Not everything they say is GMO free had gmo to begin with. Yes it is GMO free, but it never had it. Not true in all cases. They use it as big advertising. Now back to organic. If you look up organic it more less means something living. Natural would be more of a word people should use, but we dont. I like to use grass fed, farm raised, free range, etc. Now even the big guys are slinging the word organic to their benefit so I dont buy something just because it says organic.
"Certified Organic" does not mean anything you want it to. It means you follow a defined set of criteria and approved practices for raising your crops and/or livestock. You are inspected, and required to keep accurate records. It's no different then being certified Kosher, Certified Angus Beef, a Certified ASE Mechanic, or anything else. All it means is that your work or product is expected to meet a set of standards.

I don't disagree that organic is a big money word these days. But here's the problem. You get someone who says - I don't spray, I don't use GMO's and then the start claiming their stuff as Organic. It's not, but the general public doesn't know better, so all of a sudden the term organic starts getting cloudy. It's a bit like where the discussion in this thread went. (no offense meant). I opened it thinking I was going to see some organic livestock. But it went down a bit different track..... Not bad or good, just different than what I expected.

I just wanted to throw my 2 cents in because I have an interest in organic livestock because my family farmed about 700 acres organically in IA for a long time, and had a cow/calf operation and fed out around 125 of our calves per year for organic beef. I was very close to opening my own organic dairy back when I was in my 20's. I didn't do it, but the jury is still out on whether that was the best or worst decision of my life.... :tango_face_grin:
 

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"Certified Organic" does not mean anything you want it to. It means you follow a defined set of criteria and approved practices for raising your crops and/or livestock. You are inspected, and required to keep accurate records. It's no different then being certified Kosher, Certified Angus Beef, a Certified ASE Mechanic, or anything else. All it means is that your work or product is expected to meet a set of standards.

I don't disagree that organic is a big money word these days. But here's the problem. You get someone who says - I don't spray, I don't use GMO's and then the start claiming their stuff as Organic. It's not, but the general public doesn't know better, so all of a sudden the term organic starts getting cloudy. It's a bit like where the discussion in this thread went. (no offense meant). I opened it thinking I was going to see some organic livestock. But it went down a bit different track..... Not bad or good, just different than what I expected.

I just wanted to throw my 2 cents in because I have an interest in organic livestock because my family farmed about 700 acres organically in IA for a long time, and had a cow/calf operation and fed out around 125 of our calves per year for organic beef. I was very close to opening my own organic dairy back when I was in my 20's. I didn't do it, but the jury is still out on whether that was the best or worst decision of my life.... :tango_face_grin:
No offense taken. I will agree with you. This thread went in the same cloudy area as the word organic. :tango_face_wink:
Seems like coulda pushed more on 700 acres, but that is awesome.
Dairy is tough.
You are right. You do have to follow certain guidelines to be certified organic. We never will be, but we will be as close as we can. It is following rules that I have a problem with. That is why I am self employed.......and a sinking ship. :sidelaugh We do do our best to stay as natural and chemical free as possible, but when none of your neighbors do and something rather it be an animal, weed seed, virus, etc you either take some sort of action or lose everything you got.
I think if we had a larger farm or ranch I would have a better chance because there would be a larger perimeter. When you are a small farm and your neighbors use all chemicals that are seeping through the ground or over spraying to you there isnt anything you can really do except say as close to natural as I can possibly do it.
 

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Seems like coulda pushed more on 700 acres, but that is awesome.
We row cropped roughly 500 acres of that, we did a 5 year rotation on it. Corn, soybeans, oats, alfalfa, alfalfa. The cow calf herd was on the rest. Some years we would also graze yearlings, instead of putting them right onto full feed in the fall. Depended on the market. If we did that, we'd typically plant some supplemental sudan grass for the yearlings to graze paddock style during the summer.


I think if we had a larger farm or ranch I would have a better chance because there would be a larger perimeter. When you are a small farm and your neighbors use all chemicals that are seeping through the ground or over spraying to you there isnt anything you can really do except say as close to natural as I can possibly do it.
The whole perimeter thing is a pain. We were fortunate enough to have roads on most sides, which are wide enough to qualify as a buffer, so we only had to do the dedicated perimeter buffer areas on a few parts of our farm. We had a co-op drift on us once while spraying across the road. They learned an expensive lesson that day as they were spraying restricted product in too high of wind speeds.

My parents ended up getting divorced and the farm was split up with it. So that was the end of that. But if I were to ever try something again, I'd probably be like you. More relaxed, and not jumping through the organic hoops. But still trying to do things naturally.
 

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We row cropped roughly 500 acres of that, we did a 5 year rotation on it. Corn, soybeans, oats, alfalfa, alfalfa. The cow calf herd was on the rest. Some years we would also graze yearlings, instead of putting them right onto full feed in the fall. Depended on the market. If we did that, we'd typically plant some supplemental sudan grass for the yearlings to graze paddock style during the summer.




The whole perimeter thing is a pain. We were fortunate enough to have roads on most sides, which are wide enough to qualify as a buffer, so we only had to do the dedicated perimeter buffer areas on a few parts of our farm. We had a co-op drift on us once while spraying across the road. They learned an expensive lesson that day as they were spraying restricted product in too high of wind speeds.

My parents ended up getting divorced and the farm was split up with it. So that was the end of that. But if I were to ever try something again, I'd probably be like you. More relaxed, and not jumping through the organic hoops. But still trying to do things naturally.
I think a lot more people are realizing how hard it is and are just happy to have products from something that is close enough rather than not at all.
 
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