My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
I Love All Color Tractors
Joined
·
22,321 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am in the market for a pressure canner and would like your opinions on a couple of home canners.

My mother used an old tried and true Presto for many many years with good success.

I am looking at two; a new Presto and a new All American.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0000BYCFU/ref=pe_99620_16552460_pe_epc_d1

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00004S88Z/ref=pe_99620_16552460_pe_epc_d2

I know that they both will work well if used properly, but I really like the looks of the All American. I just looks safer to me, but is the safer look justification for the much higher price?

The chances of failure with both of them are slim if used properly, that is why I am having a hard time convincing myself that the All American is worth the extra money.

Opinions? :thanku:
 

·
Native Texan
Joined
·
95 Posts
Seems like they are both made in Wisconsin. That's a plus!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I always like stuff that appears to be safer too. With a pressure canner we are talking less pressure than in your car tires, however it isn't something to be messed with either due to the built up steam inside. I think either would do well looks and price are a good determiner for anyone. Some are willing to pay the extra price for the looks while others can "stand" the looks for the lower cost. I say go with your gut.
 

·
Senior Tinkerer
Joined
·
1,577 Posts
The All American is worth the extra money if you plan on canning for more than one or two seasons. That unit will last a lifetime, for sure!

The no-gasket sealing system and the sturdy lock-down system are great features. Ours does not have the automatic pressure release valve (which the Amazon one does) and that is another great feature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
My wife and I use a Presto that was handed down to us by my older sister who canned for six kids. She got it from my mother who canned for eight kids.

My point is that it was well used, but well cared for. When we got it I took it down to the local hardware store where the owner replaced all the seals and tested the pressure guage. Good as new! This thing will last for many more generations. Plus it pays to support your local businesses. You won't get that kind of help from Wally World!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
I always like stuff that appears to be safer too. With a pressure canner we are talking less pressure than in your car tires, however it isn't something to be messed with either due to the built up steam inside. .
Your making me get my GEEK on.

Steam pressure is not like air pressure. When steam has pressure the temperature at which water boils rises.At 10PSI the steam/water temp is 239F. If the vessel suddenly relases pressure then all the water thats at 239F will flash boil untill it has released enough energy (Heat) to lower the pressure to atmosphere (0psig). The steam itself will also relaese energy until it is at 212F. If you happen to be in contact with the steam then you get to absorb that energy release plus the energy of the latent heat of fusion that is released when the steam changes state back to water. Thats why steam burns are extreamly bad.

I have 2 Prestos, My aunt has an all american that is atleast 60 years old. She still uses it every year.
 

·
I Love All Color Tractors
Joined
·
22,321 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I really appreciate the comments thus far.

I am really leaning toward the All American.

Now if I can get the price down. Hmmmph......
 

·
L120/G110 Hybridizer
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
I have an OLD All American unit. It's marked Model #7 on the bottom, but it's the same casting as the current 915 model. The difference is it has the gauge and bleed/pressure relief valve only, unlike the newer models with the gauge and pressure setting assembly. You have to adjust the canning pressure by regulating the heat source, a full time job.

At any rate, the canner has worked well for me the past 40 years. I picked it up at an auction for $2. It was probably 25-30 years old at that time. It still works well today and the machined seal still holds. It's a well built product.

After seeing this thread, I looked around on the net and found I can purchase parts for the pressure assembly to "upgrade" it. Now that's setting a new standard for "support" on old equipment! ;)

Just my two cents, but it may be helpful.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
My advice is to get what you like! Both are good quality and will outlast you if properly cared for. Most important is to find a reputable source for canning directions & recipes. There are a multitude of good sources on the web (manufacturer's sites), from your home extension services, and many others. Pick one you trust because there's lots of bad advice out there! And in this case bad can kill you!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,567 Posts
If it is still available, one of the best canning books is the Ball Blue Book of Canning. It has very good instructions and recipes. My grandmother and mother used them as far back as I can remember. (I'm 72.)
Dave
 

·
I Love All Color Tractors
Joined
·
22,321 Posts
Discussion Starter #13

·
I Love All Color Tractors
Joined
·
22,321 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I have narrowed it to the 22 to 23ish quart size that hold either seven quarts or up to 19 pints. Basically, it is between the two that I posted the links to in my OP.

Weight is not a factor. I have a ceramic top range but I already have an outdoor propane burner that I will be using. I just don't want to chance the weight on the top of a $1500 range. Besides, the burner will keep the heat out of the house. Also, the chances of a catastrophic failure are extremely slim to none, but, you never know.

Again, I am really leaning toward the All American. The factors that I really like is that there are no rubber gaskets to replace, I REALLY like the lid security system on the All American, the geared gauge, and the wall thickness is nearly twice that of the Presto.

Right now, finding a price lower than $200 is on my list. Don't get me wrong, I am willing to pay the $200 for a quality, never have to buy again, American product, but I am like everyone else, dollars add up and matter to me.
 

·
Senior Tinkerer
Joined
·
1,577 Posts
I have narrowed it to the 22 to 23ish quart size that hold either seven quarts or up to 19 pints. Basically, it is between the two that I posted the links to in my OP.

Weight is not a factor. I have a ceramic top range but I already have an outdoor propane burner that I will be using. I just don't want to chance the weight on the top of a $1500 range. Besides, the burner will keep the heat out of the house. Also, the chances of a catastrophic failure are extremely slim to none, but, you never know.

Again, I am really leaning toward the All American. The factors that I really like is that there are no rubber gaskets to replace, I REALLY like the lid security system on the All American, the geared gauge, and the wall thickness is nearly twice that of the Presto.

Right now, finding a price lower than $200 is on my list. Don't get me wrong, I am willing to pay the $200 for a quality, never have to buy again, American product, but I am like everyone else, dollars add up and matter to me.
Using the propane burner sounds like a great plan! We have a ceramic top stove and use the 10 1/2 qt. size canner on it. It has worked very well, so far.

Back when we did more canning, one that held 7 quarts (instead of the 4 that ours holds) would have been more attractive.

One thing that is not clear to me is what the advantage is to the larger units which still only hold 7 quarts? The 15 1/2, 21 1/2, and 25 qt. models all will only hold 7 quarts.
Maybe people do other things with them that require the larger size. We only use ours for canning and have another (Fagor) pressure cooker for use with cooking food not in jars.
 

·
I Love All Color Tractors
Joined
·
22,321 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
The advantage is the height. Of the three that you listed, I looked at the 15 1/2 and the 21 1/2. While they both hold seven quart jars each, the 21 1/2 with its added height will allow you to double stack the pints and double the number.
 

·
Retired Super Moderator - Deceased September 2015
Joined
·
26,679 Posts
I would go for the Presto one. Money reason only. I have a smaller Presto that I have used for years and it has not had ANY problems, knock on wood.:thThumbsU
 

·
Senior Tinkerer
Joined
·
1,577 Posts
The advantage is the height. Of the three that you listed, I looked at the 15 1/2 and the 21 1/2. While they both hold seven quart jars each, the 21 1/2 with its added height will allow you to double stack the pints and double the number.
Thanks. That is good info. We never did many pints, so that issue did not come up! :fing32:
 

·
L120/G110 Hybridizer
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
One thing that is not clear to me is what the advantage is to the larger units which still only hold 7 quarts? The 15 1/2, 21 1/2, and 25 qt. models all will only hold 7 quarts.
Maybe people do other things with them that require the larger size. We only use ours for canning and have another (Fagor) pressure cooker for use with cooking food not in jars.
Besides being able to stack pints in the taller units, they can also be used to boiling water process quarts, since you can get ~2" of water over the tops of the quart jars. The 15 qt and less units can only be used to pressure can quarts. We have a separate tall canning pot that we use when we process quarts in hot water bath.

Our #7 (915) unit works great for pressure canning pints and quarts, and boiling water processing pints.

Paul
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top