My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings,

Sorry if I've posted to the wrong forum but I'm running out of places to post this question on ye olde world wide web.

I have an old tool my late father gave me and don't know what it is.

It is 62 inches long, both arms and the hook on top are free swinging.

Any help will be greatly appreciated!
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,567 Posts
That looks like a take up tool for a fence stretcher. You may have to check with Google to find pictures of a complete one.
Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts
Hi there vectoruzi,

My guess is that it belongs in the peek of a barn's hay mow:
- used in the horse days, before hay bale elevators, and used with a rope and pulley system to unload a wagon load of hay and get it into the upper floor of the barn, through a gable door just below the roof line

--------------------------------------
Beaumont { :>)) www.petperfectexpress.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=135888 http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=136600&page=3
1992 JD 318 original paint w/484 hr. on P218g Onan & #49 snow blower / 1998 JD GT262 w/brand new Kawasaki OHV & 48" rebuilt deck
http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=135838
 

·
Retired Super Moderator - Deceased September 2015
Joined
·
26,679 Posts
Looks more like a log roller for when you set them for a house and you can turn them to fit tighter.
 

·
life is good
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
I just had my dad look at it (he's 75) and he has no idea what it might be.
But he doesn't remember anything like that for a hay mow, they used nets back then.
The net would be loaded and lifted then run down the trolly track to where it would be dumped.
As to a log tool like a peavy I'm not sure, what/how would you apply the pressure to the hooks to make it "hold onto" the log?
I'm really searching to help ya out as I'm really interested to see what it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,115 Posts
I've got to agree with farmtechdave's Dad about that not being used in a hay mow. I got in on the very last of the horse farming and the systems we used for putting hay in a barn were not at all similar to that tool. Either loose or the later baled hay.

I did see a similar device at a small sawmill up in the mountains one time. Guy had a mill that cut just big beams from old growth fir. These were big beams upwards to 40 feet long and a couple of feet square. He had a tool like that but instead of a hook to lift from it had a ring. They had a swinging gin pole and winch system that allowed picking the beams up and loading them on the trucks. One as small as the sample would work for smaller beams and having the handle on it would allow easy positioning of the item. I don't think this was used for wood beams as there would be no need for the forked ends on the two lifting arms. Really looks like a one-off tool someone made for lifting specific items with those forks to hook into something. The lifting hook and other parts appear to have been made on a forge which leads me to believe it's specific made.

Maybe for handling something like ten gallon milk cans of days gone by?

Interesting tool at any rate, something that makes you go "hmmm!" when you visit a historical museum.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
All,

Thanks for all the input. Based on the discussions so far I've decided I need to add some more detail about the tool. Specificially, the length of the two grappling arms, how far apart they are, how wide they open. Also thought I would include the circumference of the handle where it attaches to the tooling as it is pretty thick implying that it is used to handle a lot of weight and/or apply a lot of torque to whatever it was designed to do. Any other suggestions on what additional characteristics might be of interest to those reading this thread will be appreciated. I will also post some better pictures as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,115 Posts
Showed the pictures to a neighbor that stopped by. He's on the high side of 90 and he had not seen one of these before. Old boy is plenty sharp and still drives his own pickup. Only thing he said about it was that it looked home made to him and that he would guess someone was fixing a problem they had.

Apparently not something that was all that common, at least in this area.

Mike

Just had a thought. Did they used to harvest ice in the winter where this was found?

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
As others have stated it isn't anything I have ever seen in the old hay barns.

I am just WAGging here, but the shape of the hooks appear to be made to engage a chain of some sort. Possibly a water well chain jack?
 

·
life is good
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
One of my buddies thought it could be a smelting pot handle to remove it from the kiln/fire.
I'll also ask the amish folks I know next time I see them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,761 Posts
Either for logs or blocks of ice.
 

·
MTF Member
Joined
·
425 Posts
Could it be a home made tool used by the ground man to pull fence posts? The hook is connected to a tractor or some other stationary device, and the two forged arms hand down with gravity to about 6" apart and then are hammered in to get a bite and lift? :confused:
DMAC
 

·
The voice of reason !
Joined
·
2,720 Posts
I'm no expert at all but based on what I see it's strictly for lifting and the handle like has been stated is for guidance and to release it, but what you would lift with it I haven't a clue ?
 

·
MTF Member
Joined
·
425 Posts
Maybe it could lift the crucible that melted the material used to make its arms. When the chainfall and beam became available the old 2 man device became obsolete and they made this helpful tool.
DMAC
 

·
life is good
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
It's not for ice, dad and the amish around here have done that. Well that's all the amish do, ice tongs are like log tongs, as you lift or put pressure on the hook the arms have pressure put on the to grab the ice or log. The harder you pull the more force is added.
 

·
Old Stonebreaker
Joined
·
3,398 Posts
I've studied this a lot and I can't see any mechanical advantage to it. I'm guessing the single hook was attached to some lifting device and the two "tongs" attached to whatever was being lifted thru chain, bolts or handles of some kind and the tool in question was simply used to rotate the load on a flat axis to the desired position. I'm also guessing the load was extremely hot or extremely heavy to need a handle that long to rotate it.
JMBWAG,
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top