My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Looking forward to hearing some funny stories or memories that you have from being on the farm. Doesn't really matter what they are. Just something new to read about on here :trink39:

One memory I have is me and my youngest brother (probably around 6 and my brother 4) walking around the grain bends and my little brother saying "watch this" and threw a hammer at the grain bend only to have it bounce back hitting my square in the four head knocking him out. While dying laughing only thing I knew to do was carry him up to the house (still laughing) only to get a nasty spanking cause My mom thought I did it haha!
 

·
Retired Super Moderator - Deceased September 2015
Joined
·
26,679 Posts
My Grandpa always picked whole Ear Corn and then stored. When it was time to shell it, one cousin, from California, city boy, had not had the experience. It was funny watching him dancing around when the mice and rats were running all around and a couple up his pant legs!:sidelaugh:sidelaugh
Of course, being the good cousins we were, we didn't tell him to tie his pant legs with Baling twine to prevent that from happening.
 

·
Just Have a Little Faith!
Joined
·
9,271 Posts
Grandma used to raise layin' hens for the egg money. Back in the thirties, this money bought a lot of essentials.

Well, she had just got a shipment of firtile eggs and they were sitting out in the corn crib. My Dad, Ivan who was the oldest of 7 kids and his brother Francis, were out in the crib fooling around when Francis up and throws an egg at Dad! Not to be outdone, he picks one up and throws it back. They didn't quit until every egg was broke. And here comes Grandma.

She was so mad!!! She whipped one boy and then the other, then the first one, etc.

Another time, there was a threshing crew at the farm and they were gathering around the farm yard for lunch. There was an old billy goat that someone had given to the kids for a pet. One of the crew got it into his head to pick up that goat and throw it in the stock tank. The goat didn't appreciate it and flew out of the tank and ran at top speed around the house. When it came to the cyclone cellar, which Grandma used for a cold cellar, it leaped over the door, streaming a steady stream of dirty old goaty water, just as Grandma was climbing up with a pan of fresh butter!!!

It was real soon after that the goat went away.
 

·
Citizen of Earth
Joined
·
15,291 Posts
As a kid, I worked summers at a "gentleman's" estate farm. He raised hay to feed the horses in the stable for his daughter, and hired a local farmer to bale it. Me and another couple of kids unloaded the hay bales and stacked them in the barn. One day I was the one unloading the wagon and the other 2 guys were in the barn when I got a hay bale that included most of a skunk. Sent it up the conveyor and waited..... took about 5 seconds before the 2 guys come screaming out of the barn holding their noses and sweating up a storm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
As a kid, I worked summers at a "gentleman's" estate farm. He raised hay to feed the horses in the stable for his daughter, and hired a local farmer to bale it. Me and another couple of kids unloaded the hay bales and stacked them in the barn. One day I was the one unloading the wagon and the other 2 guys were in the barn when I got a hay bale that included most of a skunk. Sent it up the conveyor and waited..... took about 5 seconds before the 2 guys come screaming out of the barn holding their noses and sweating up a storm.
:trink39:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Anyone have any good stories about riding on the planter and feeding it seed as they planted or picking up rocks out in the fields before planting season?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,235 Posts
Never rode on a planter but have ridden on a cultivator......when the weeds would get caught on the cultivator arms, my uncle would stop and we would jump down and pull them off and we would be off again. he built a wooden platform for us to sit on. We would sit on the platform with our feet hanging off of the back of the cultivator. IF we did fall off for some reason......we had to run and catch back up or wait for him to stop to get weeds off.......lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
That sounds pretty much like what we did haha just loading instead of picking off. Can't say that we ever did fall off though haha!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Here's a few of my memories from 1993;

In the summer of 1993, the Mississippi River got big. Really, *really* big in July. I grew up on a farm in Missouri and we owned and farmed a few hundred acres on some floodplain ground on the other side of the levee. For the most part, during the summer months, the river never got big enough to flood the crops behind there, but planting there was always a risky venture. You couldn't plant crops too early, or too let them mature too late, lest the risk of the mighty Mississippi turning your crop into catfish food. Often times, it was a safe bet to plant soybeans. Corn was risky because it needed to go in so early and every now and then, the river would recede long enough to get a crop to establish, but springtime rains could swell the river beyond it's banks to take over the corn.

In 1993, it was different. It was the middle of summer and most all the farmland behind the levee was planted in soybeans. It was on track to become a good year, but each day, torrential rains upriver kept causing the river crest forecast to rise.

My grandfather always told my dad and uncle to count each crop harvested over there a blessing and not a given. As a result, most of our land resided on the protected side and a total crop loss wouldn't have done us in (you couldn't insure crops on that land because of the risk). However, it was very fertile ground, relatively cheap, and as such other farmers had most of their livelihood invested in there. If they lost a crop, they went bankrupt. So a bunch of farmers decided to fight the river. But as my grandfather says "Everyone wants to fight the river, but there ain't many winners"...

The race to build a levee was on. There were every make, model, and size tractor pulling dirt scoops and dirt drags hauling dirt. Mechanical front wheel drive, articulated, 2 wheel drive, heck, they even hired a custom dirt hauler to build a section of it. Out of that experience came untold stories, some funny, some scary, but all of it memories. *names have been changed to protect identities*

The "Sliders" were a couple of young farmers with their father that had a bunch of money vested in their crop. They were the hardest-working, most ethical, and super-motivated out of everyone over there. I was always surprised at how much work they could accomplish. I can't say enough of how much I looked up to them and respected them. Really good guys. Their father was a great guy as well. Unfortunately, they often had run-ins with local hunters/fishermen trespassing on their property. Now I'm not saying that's wrong or anything, but when trespassing on someone else's property involves leaving a trail of trash and destroying your crop in the process...well that's where I draw the line. Most folk around the area were usually respectful, but there are always those that don't and give everyone else a bad rap.

Now Ben Slider was a big burly man with a voice (and temper) to match. Big rivers have a tendency to attract a lot of attention from sightseers, and often times, Ben would intercept them in the pickup before they got there to turn them away, not only to have them stay out of our way, but also for their own safety. He also turned away a bunch of fishermen. Ben never liked fishermen ever since he had that one conversation with a ex-farmer and avid fisherman, Clyde Beekins. The last line in the conversation I recall hearing about before Ben turned and walked away with steam coming from his ears was uttered from Clyde; "You know, the farmers have had a lot of good years, I think it's time the fishermen have a good year." I don't think hearing that sat too well with Ben, bless him. Another time, a local farmer who had no land behind the levee approached him and told him flat out that "If this levee puts any backwater onto my property and crops, I'm gonna come over here with dynamite and blow it up!". That time too, I think he just walked away. Ben must have mellowed out in his older years because I'm sure he probably would have had something else to say in his younger years.

You be surprised how often tractors got stuck when it is dry. The tractors pulling loaded buckets on top of a levee that was 15 foot tall and growing would get a little tipsy on the peak of the levee. The problem was, if a bucket got crossways and started sliding down the slope of the levee, it will pull anything down with it. Tim Slider was driving a John Deere 4955 with double Reynolds buckets. There was crossing in a treeline with borrow pits that flanked both sides of the levee, so in that short 100 foot section, the height of the levee was big.. probably more like 25 foot. When the trailing bucket slid down the slope into the trees, it took the whole rig with it. The tractor was still clinging to the side of the levee, but the both buckets were very much wedged in the mud in the bottom of the borrow pit.

You would've thought it would've pulled out...after all it was a Mechanical front wheel drive tractor and it was dry, but it was stuck fast. The tires would just dig a hole under the tractor. Time to haul out the dragline cables. The "Brady" boys were some other great guys and were helping out. They hooked up their Case IH Steiger (9170 I think) articulated tractor up to the stuck John Deere. It couldn't drag the Deere out. The most vivid memory I have was watching 24 tons of machinery pawing at the ground and hopping at LEAST 3 inches off the ground trying to get the tractor out. I was sure the gears were going to explode out the bottom of that tractor. Not the most scary thing I've seen, but in the top five. I remember walking farther and farther away as the two screaming tractors running at full chat, both madly clawing (and one trying to do a high jump), shook the earth and trees around them. I figured, maybe if i was another 1000 foot away, I would be safe if that cable broke! In the end the Steiger couldn't find the traction. They eventually got a D8 Caterpiller to pull the Deere out. I don't even think the old D8 even broke a sweat. It just tugged and popped the Deere right it out.

The very same Steiger was involved in another incident later that week, in almost the exact same crossing. "Willy" was a good ole boy who let me ride with him for awhile. Great guy. As he was pulling a single reynolds across, the same thing happened...it got a little tippy-toppy, and over she went, pulling the huge tractor with it. Tim was there in the area, got out and rushed over to his tractor, now perched at a precarious 30 degree angle on the side of the levee. Tim said that when he got there, he opened the cab to the tractor (you'd be surprised how heavy they are when gravity is fighting you. I know, I slid down an levee once before too.), there was Willy, clinging tightly to the steering wheel and seat and trying to stay upright in the cab just to say in a very panicked voice, "I think I'm stuck!" Well no kidding! We got a little bit smarter this time around. We unhooked the dirt pan from the tractor and drove the tractor out, then took the cable and dragged the dirt scoop back onto the top of the levee... butt first. Once back there, we hooked it back up. Too bad it took the better part of 3 hours to get it out. Tim later said "Willy don't ever slide that tractor off in there anymore!"

Tensions really got frayed as time went on. We had the levee built, but every forecast kept raising the river crest higher and higher. So we kept adding, little by little to it. We must have hauled dirt for 45 days. Our little Versatile articulated tractor was nearly done in by hauling dirt. Broken hitch clevises on our dirt scoop were our problem. The clevises were solid cast and weighed a good 20 lbs, but we snapped one every other week. Finally we ordered a custom built one that was made even heavier. It lasted until we were done.

Funny thing happens when the river gets up that high against the levee. Seepwater invaded all the areas we were digging dirt out of (which of course was right next to the levee). The ground that was dry had a sponge like characteristic. You'd watch a tractor roll over the ground and the soil would compress and then spring right back up! Talk about creepy! And don't even think about the amount of force that the earthen levee that was built not 30 days ago is holding back! Funnier things happen to people. One woman landowner, who was terribly frazzled at the potential loss she would take if she lost a crop, lectured a helping farmer for wearing a starched white button down shirt while working. I guess she thought he wasn't working hard enough. I think at the time, I didn't realize how much this year would effect everyone.

As time went on, the stories of levees breaking were all around. Our area was dire as well. With the river on one side, and seepwater invading the borrow pits on the other, our ability to work was very restricted. In the last few days, tractors would commonly get stuck in the mud from the seepwater. We would joke about the dire-hard John Deere guys having a heart attack if they ever saw them being pulled out by a Case IH Magnum or Versatile. We drove the tractors, single file down the levee, and then then stopped at a wide spot on high ground to turn around, wait until all the others arrived, and then head back to retrieve more dirt. It was a long trek to get dirt. In the closing days, there was even talk about trucking dirt in, but it wasn't going to do much good since we needed it now. In desperation, to get an extra few inches (yes that's all it took for the river to top the levee), the Sliders brought in their trackhoes (tracked excavators) to dig mud out on the down side of the levee to put on top. Even wakes from riverboat traffic could have been disastrous if they hadn't imposed speed limits on barges at that time. No tractors could haul dirt anymore. There was no place close by to get it, you had to cross a lake of seepwater to get on the levee, and besides there was no more spots to even turn around if you got there.

It's only by the grace of God our levee held and water began to recede. We were once again rewarded with a bountiful soybean crop. Something about the high water table kept the plants supplied with plenty of water. We were fortunate that in our area, we had not received any rain to halt work on the levee.

I think in the next few years, the hard stuff would have to begin...namely, who's going to maintain the levee? The same crisis that bought us together, ultimately torn us apart, over bickering on how, who, and why maintain the levee. I know for us, we sold our land to a lumber company who started a tree farm. Many of the other farmers who had their "eggs all in one basket", saw how precarious the situation could have been. Most of them sold to the same lumber company, or hunting leases, or diversified to mitigate risk.

You often look back at those times and think afterward, how cow! Why did I not realize it was so dangerous IF something bad would have happened?

-john
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Dad told me a couple of good ones before.
Back in 1989 dad and grandpa had a salesman for refrigerators keep coming over. So one day the bull was loose and the guy comes over. So he runs into the barn and locks himself in the milkhouse. When they got the bull penned up the salesman came back out and was about to leave only to find his car smashed by the bull. Lucky for dad the salesman took fault for it, but the insurance company didn't cover the car.
A few years before I was born a cop was in our field lane and wouldn't budge, so grandpa took our JD 4040 and hooked a chain to the rear of the car while the cop was asleep. When the cop woke up he was dumfounded to find himself at the nieghbors car garage/shop.
Hope you liked those ones. :thThumbsU
 

·
Citizen of Earth
Joined
·
15,291 Posts
My grandparents bought a small 2 acre piece of land during the Great Depression, about 1931 or '32. My grandfather was a carpenter and luckily still had a job working on the railroad. He dug out his own basement with a shovel and built the house himself. On their little plot, they raised chickens, geese, turkeys, rabbits, and one pig each year. The pig lived under the chicken coop. My grandpa always had some sort of cross breed hunting dog, and this is the story about the beagle he had. Beagles aren't much use for hunting birds, but this one could find a rabbit just about anywhere, and he'd hunt all day every day if given the chance....... until my mom's little sister got in the rabbit pen to play with the bunnys. there was about 35 or 40 rabbits that mostly hopped out of the pen and surrounded the beagle. Poor dog ended up hiding in his doghouse howling his heart out. He never would hunt after that day. My grandpa was not pleased, but the damage was done.

My grandma was a short stocky woman, plain in her features, with raven black hair, and a lightning quick temper. In her 93 years on earth, we family members calculated that she actually laughed out loud 7 times in her life. She was hanging up laundry outside to dry when she heard a commotion in the chicken coop. Walking up the lawn, she opened the door to see a weasle in the coop! Looking around the lawn for anything to defend her chickens with, she picked up a Croquet mallet and flattened the weasle's head. Grandma was VERY protective of her chickens because the egg money was a large part of what paid the bills. When I helped remodel the kitchen, we found egg reciepts that had slid under the old cabinets. One showed that grandma had sold 36 dozen eggs for 10 cents a dozen, getting her $3.60 credit at the grocery store (Imagine the local grocery buying local eggs and produce today??!!). My grandpa was making something like $1.50 a day just before WWII.
 

·
Just Have a Little Faith!
Joined
·
9,271 Posts
I don't know a lot of details, so you have to use your imagination. My Dad told a story about when he was young. They had a 1 1/2 yr old Belgian stallion that for one reason or another they never got around to halter breaking. So one day some men got together and got him cornered in the barn. They tied a hay rope to a post and to his halter. Then they threw open the barn door. Here's where your imagination comes into play!!! Ever see a Belgian do somersaults?

Well, it didn't tame that horse, that's for sure.(I could have told them that, but I wasn't born yet). They fooled all morning with the horse until they tired out. Then one of the men said he had an idea and for the rest of them to go on home. Later that day he was seen leading that horse down the road to the neighbor's farm. I guess they never knew what he did.

Yeah! Poor ending to the story. I just always visualize that horse hitting the end of that rope. I wish it was on youtube!!! Kinda' like that Bud commercial where the Belgian is running at a gallop on the beach.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I guess when I was about 3 or 4 we had a Honda Big Red three wheeler with the blimp size tires and I guess I hopped on and took off across the field in my diaper and it took my dad and grandpa like 10 minutes to get me haha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Yeah those three wheelers have a few stories of their own...

I must have been around 10 years old when my dad and I hopped on our Honda 110 to run to the end of the field to do something (I forget what). On the way back, we were running parallel to a deep drainage ditch. My dad ran over a water furrow a bit too fast and lost control and we were both were dumped into the ditch.

We weren't hurt but we found out that day that the Honda with those big tires, could float! We pushed it out and continued on our way but in the crash we splashed out a couple of confused crawdads and one very angry loggerhead turtle onto the banks of the ditch, though....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
They def float haha I broke through the ice on our pond one year just with the front tire and it just floated there in the water maybe about a foot or a little less! Made it easy to pull it out haha
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top