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Parts collector
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Never had a Issue The Previous Loader Tractor On the Farm was a Model A styled Narrow front. It was Very common to Put Loaders On Narrow front Tractors. Only if your careless! You might have a issue But we were Never careless Only standard front we Had was a JD 4000. Great Uncle Didn't Use Much chemical weed control. So he cultivated Crops So he Needed for a 3020 Narrow which Had a JD 45 Farm Loader The tractor was Bought new the with a Loader the Year I was Born. But I see there always some careless people out there that tip there Narrow fronts :)
That's all dad had was narrow fronts. As did most of the neighbors. Did not know tipping one over ways a problem. But then there has always been stupid.

Well we had a guy mowing with the 3020 "narrow" and he hit a rock in the field and flipped the tractor. Not stupid just unseen obstacles.
 

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How the heck would he have gotten the mower over a rock that size? Guess it pays to know the field your working in and pay attention to what you are doing in stead of laa laa dream land.
 

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Well we had a guy mowing with the 3020 "narrow" and he hit a rock in the field and flipped the tractor. Not stupid just unseen obstacles.
Guess he forgot where the rock was unless it was his first time Mowing that area.

We always would walk our fields if doing any mowing regardless if You Had been over it a 100 times and the Standard Front JD 4000 did most of the Mowing anyways By the time I was Old enough. I was 6 when he Bought It. Didn't get to drive That until I was 8 But was driving the A Styled(NF) at about 5&1/2 years old Standing Up. As I couldn't sit down & reach the pedals until I was about 7 or 8..

But as I said we never had a issue as we were not careless and I didn't live there full time Until My Last year of High School But I knew the fields well and they were Gradual Hills going down to streams. Never Once did I feel Uneasy On the 3020(NF) (Loader was on 100% of the time) or the A Styled(NF). Only Tractor that seemed unstable was his Neighbors Farmall Cub Off set. When it didn't Have the Front Mount Backhoe on. That thing could be scary on hillsides and It was a standard front Tractor but that off set engine really changed the Center of Gravity. Some of these Modern Compact Utilities to me feel a little more unstable than that old 3020(NF) did

I will say that Paying attention to detail it wasn't the Army that taught me that. It was driving narrow front tractors. Because if careless with a narrow front your either permanently hurt or dead. Never had any ROPS or aftermarket ROPS Put On any of the 4 tractors as he also Had a standard Front Model A(AR) with steel wheels :)
 

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Parts collector
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Yes he was new, and 2 years younger than me. He knew the land but not really, he lived right across the street from the farm. It was his first year farming for us. heck i didn't know that farm either. i knew the other 2 but not that one. I was in the chicken house and skidding poop out to the spreader not in the fields.

You were in the Army? Thanks for your service sir!
 

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That the one place I feel Deere is to greedy and yet Deere Is not Making money on the repairs the dealers our.
Don't forget that JD makes a ton of money off of the dealers who have to buy the diagnostic equipment and ythen payo to "license" the software from JD. It's the same for any manufacturer's brand these days, whether it's cars or tractors. The car manufacturers have alrady been through the court system and so there are third party engine analysis computers, but even those are pricey because they still need to purchase a license form the manufacturer. Then there's the "tuner" market, which make computers that the oewner's can use to diagnose and to modify the factory programming, and the companies that sell those still charge quite a bit, usually several hundred to even a couple of thousand dollars, but that is nowhere near what the licensed machines cost, which the last I heard several years ago, are usually in the $25,000.00 range for the machine, plus a couple of thousand per year for the software licenses in order to keep getting access to the updated programs fo rthe new models year after year.
 

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Don't forget that JD makes a ton of money off of the dealers who have to buy the diagnostic equipment and ythen payo to "license" the software from JD. It's the same for any manufacturer's brand these days, whether it's cars or tractors. The car manufacturers have alrady been through the court system and so there are third party engine analysis computers, but even those are pricey because they still need to purchase a license form the manufacturer. Then there's the "tuner" market, which make computers that the oewner's can use to diagnose and to modify the factory programming, and the companies that sell those still charge quite a bit, usually several hundred to even a couple of thousand dollars, but that is nowhere near what the licensed machines cost, which the last I heard several years ago, are usually in the $25,000.00 range for the machine, plus a couple of thousand per year for the software licenses in order to keep getting access to the updated programs fo rthe new models year after year.
Actually dealer's don't have to pay a license fee and they just need a lap top computer with a Plug In Deere even provides the training on the software for free But You can only send so many techs at a time to get Certified In Davenport (y)
 
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