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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Found this a few months ago when I was looking for a GT to push snow around. Guy said he had saw it on ebay and bought it but needed to unload it quick. I didnt give him much for it, but I probably would have. I fell in love with the construction of it. Appears to be a narrowed Ford? rear end with independent rear brakes and a chevy transmission belt driven off a Wisconsin AEH motor.




At some point someone cut the front end out from under it and it has been replaced by the front of a riding mower. The steering was hob-knobbed together and when you turn the wheel right it goes left and turning left it goes right.

I was able to get it running after going through it and cleaning some of the internals up. Asked my wife if she wanted to watch me drive it around so she snapped a few pictures while she hid in the doorway where the neighbors couldnt see her. It ran good. Little scary with reverse steering and the gear reduction in the pulleys isnt enough to slow it down for tractor use.



While i was unloading it, a guy stopped and wanted to look at it and he seemed to think that it wasn't home made but actually a bought tractor that had been modified. Anyone know anything about the components that its made from? I know the transmission is a chevy. Any ideas what to do with it? I would like to put a narrow front in on it and i need to rework the seat area as I obviously do not fit well.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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That is pretty slick.

The rear axle is off a 1936 thru 1939 Ford as they were the only years that Ford used that wide bolt pattern.
The Chevy transmission would be 30's and early 40's with the floor shift.

There were a few companies that tried to build garden tractors in the late 40's and thru the 50's that used car parts.
However, this doesn't look like any of the factory built tractors that I have seen.
I think it is a home made unit.
 

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That bellhousing assembly is pretty neat looking- I am assuming that the lever is the clutch? I wonder what kind of machine that might have come from?

If your transmission is a 3-speed, then you might be able to find a 4-speed from an old pickup that has granny-low. That would slow things down a bit, and more than likely give you a PTO option on the side of the tranny.

Great find!!
 

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Sears Fan
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Looks similar to a Pow'r Pup, but a modified version. The Pow'r Pup tractors were made from plans that anyone could purchase - you bought the plans and got a bunch of car parts and steel, and built it. This looks like it might have been inspired from those plans?
 

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At some point someone cut the front end out from under it and it has been replaced by the front of a riding mower. The steering was hob-knobbed together and when you turn the wheel right it goes left and turning left it goes right.

That's just wild, a lot things wouldn't be safe in my yard if I had to deal with that steering. I'd have to do a lot of :praying:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That is pretty slick.

The rear axle is off a 1936 thru 1939 Ford as they were the only years that Ford used that wide bolt pattern.
The Chevy transmission would be 30's and early 40's with the floor shift.

There were a few companies that tried to build garden tractors in the late 40's and thru the 50's that used car parts.
However, this doesn't look like any of the factory built tractors that I have seen.
I think it is a home made unit.
Ray, just wanted to say that I actually found this website by finding a picture of your R/T tractor on a google search when I was trying to find information on mine. Since then I have read every thread you have posted and I have to say, your work is incredible. It always leaves me inspired to better my own projects when i see the quality and ingenuity of yours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That bellhousing assembly is pretty neat looking- I am assuming that the lever is the clutch? I wonder what kind of machine that might have come from?

If your transmission is a 3-speed, then you might be able to find a 4-speed from an old pickup that has granny-low. That would slow things down a bit, and more than likely give you a PTO option on the side of the tranny.

Great find!!
Yes the lever is a hand clutch. Works well. Right now I am more interested in keeping the driveline as is, but you are right, a 4 speed would be an easy solution. I would be willing bet that in 3rd I could have hit 25 or more no problem
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nice tractor ,,will make a nice project,,,,By the way is that your ford pickup in the picture..old pickups and old tractors seem to go together.
Thanks. Yes that is my 65 Ford F100 in the picture. I restored it 5 or 6 years ago and have used it as a daily driver ever since. It is one of a collection of 14 vintage vehicles. They tend to follow me home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here are some pictures of the plates and tags I found on my computer.
Tractor is buried under snow right now or I would go look for more.






It hit me this afternoon that the guy who stopped and looked at it while I was unloading it thought it was an economy. Thoughts?

Also, does anyone know the HP rating on the engine?
 

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Neat little find, Hope to see lots more :) Out of curiousity, If thats a chev rear end. How did they reduce the stance so much?
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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The AEH is rated at 5.9 HP at 2200 RPM.
Serial #965547 makes it a 1947 engine.

Out of curiousity, If thats a chev rear end. How did they reduce the stance so much?
The transmission is a Chevy but the rear end is a Ford.
 

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TexasFire
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What a cool rig, can't wait to see what you do with it. I bet that steering thing is a trip!!!

TexasFire
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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Swapping the steering from outside the frame to inside if you can take the steering arm loose from the box and move it would solve the backwards issue.
I've changed the steering arm direction on several steering boxes and it's not that big of a problem.

Some of the steering boxes have a fine spline on the shaft so the arm can be repositioned.
On some other steering boxes, several of the splines will be fused together to form a wider flat area so the arm can only fit in one position.
On this type I use a die grinder and grind out that wide flat area so the arm can then be rotated around.
 
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