My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 20 of 74 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i have replaced the original hh100 on my 66ss with a craftsman hh100.
The craftsman has the oil drain in the fount"Had a plug" and back"Had pipe". i switched the pipe to the fount and plug to the back do to clearance. Well after pulling the motor off four timer a adding more and more teflon tape i thought i had the leak stooped. Got the motor all hooked up and it started with no problems. Look down and i see oil!
LOL Now my question. What do you all use to seal the pipe threads?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
1. Check thoroughly, probably have a crack.
2. Pipe fittings are tapered. As you screw the nipple in to the motor it should get tighter. You may not have it tight enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Well Pooh! LOL i know the plug and nipple are tight.
ill try to get all the oil cleaned up and place cardboard under it to get an idea of where the oil is coming from.
 

·
Cranky Motorsports
Joined
·
15,202 Posts
I usually never even use teflon tape on fittings on these motors and they usually don't leak- look for a crack. Sometimes tightening them too tight will crack them too
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Well i cant find a crack. it may be the crank case gasket dried out from sitting? Any way im going to run it and keep a close eye on the oil! Thanks for the help guys...:)
 

·
Cranky Motorsports
Joined
·
15,202 Posts
Well i cant find a crack. it may be the crank case gasket dried out from sitting? Any way im going to run it and keep a close eye on the oil! Thanks for the help guys...:)
could be the side cover gasket. Keep a very close eye on it. These don't have very much oil in them to begin with
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,988 Posts
If the drain & plug are built into a removable 'base' or 'pan', couldn't swapping from the other HH100 insure you had the correct part and no leak? Just need to make/buy a base gasket? Dunno the HH100 per se, but many oldies have removable pans(sumps) and that would be one way to get things fixed.
tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Update.
After siting for a week it only lost about 1/2 cup of oil. i drove it about 100 yards up an down my big hill and it preformed wonderfully 1/4 throttle 3erd gear no problem at all. :) The old one at full throttle and 2ed gear would barely make it up the hill.
BUT!
Back at the shop all but 1 1/2 cups of oil was gone. :(
im going to pull the side cover and look for a crack on the inside and replace the gaskets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Got the side off and took pictures of the case to look for a crack using photo editing software. No cracks where found. The gasket is translucent in spots and has the feel and consistency of old cellophane.

2463016
2463017
2463018
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Update.
After siting for a week it only lost about 1/2 cup of oil. i drove it about 100 yards up an down my big hill and it preformed wonderfully 1/4 throttle 3erd gear no problem at all. :) The old one at full throttle and 2ed gear would barely make it up the hill.
BUT!
Back at the shop all but 1 1/2 cups of oil was gone. :(
im going to pull the side cover and look for a crack on the inside and replace the gaskets.
So how many cups when full?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,988 Posts
You can make a gasket using many different materials. Large manila envelopes, hanging folders, 'Oaktag' (dunno what it actually is), or gasket paper from an auto parts store. If I were doing it, I would make the gasket and then use some RTV sealing material, smeared using my fingers so there is a very slight coating on both sides of the gasket. The RTV will fill any scratch/mar type imperfections in the metal surface, and will set up with a little bit of cushion so if there is high/low spots, the gap might be sealed properly. You can check the fit if you don't mind making another gasket using some grease that has color. Smear on both sides of the gasket, put the thing together and snug the bolts, and then take it apart. You should see the separation marks/shapes on the gasket where the grease has parted from the surface. If you get good indications of the parts touching, on all surfaces, you should be good to go. Back when, Cheerios boxes were a good source of water pump material when $$ were tight or the parts store was closed, and you just needed to get things done.
The very thin gaskets depend on the surfaces being very well finished with minimal to no defects. The do not provide a lot of 'give' to conform, and when a finger with some RTV is smeared over the surface, their sealing improves significantly. The layer added would be so slight as to not have any effect on crankshaft end play.
tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Tom
Yes its amazing of all the stuff we can use as gasket materials. Lucky strike cigarette cartons and Pabst blue ribbon boxes where dads favorites...:)

ive got material from the store just got to find it! lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,988 Posts
I would be proud to call that my handiwork. If a failing gasket was the source of the leak, you should have that problem licked.
tom
 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
20,101 Posts
I've had to make many gaskets like that when no new ones were available locally..
A small ball pein hammer works great to "tap out" a gasket from bulk material,much better and easier than using a pair of snips or razor knife...I have a "Gimlet" tool to punch holes in stuff like leather and it works well on gaskets to make the bolt holes..

I once made a head gasket out of a sheet of copper flashing for an old REO engine I had,no one I called even heard of that brand except one old guy and he said "wish you lots of luck finding parts for THAT!--I used to sell that brand 50 years ago,all my stock was sold out decades ago"..
I think it raised the compression ratio,that engine ran very strong with the new gasket--my dad said to put aluminum paint on it for a "sealer",he said hot rodders often used copper head gaskets and they could be re-used several times by heating them up and quenching them in water first..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Man i loved that 1920 Reo Truck dad and i rebuilt back it the mid 80s. Dad would heat the copper with a cutting torch and let them air cool. He told me the copper stayed softer and therefor it seals better.
P.S. i will leave out the Reo speedwagon puns.
 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
20,101 Posts
The REO I was referring to was a small air cooled engine on a reel mower...it had a slanted cylinder like modern Honda's do,it was probably the first one to use that design..

We had some old REO 2+ ton dual wheeled "straight job" box trucks at the junkyard I worked at--only one ran,the others were seized up solid from sitting since the 50's...the cabs on all of them had very little actual "rot",but none had one flake of paint on them,inside & out,they were severely surface rusted,but still "solid"..

We always wanted to restore one of them seeing we had all the parts--but there was no way to get a title for them,and all trucks in MA need a title regardless of the year..
Sadly I watched them all get cut in half and shoved in the crusher when the yard closed up in 2005...:(..was a lot of history in that place,20 acres of vehicles ranging from the late 20's to the 80's...many strange forigen cars too like Vauxhauls and Sunbeams...there was even two '66 AMC Marlins there,very rough,but a determined person could have restored one or both,those went in the crusher too..
 
1 - 20 of 74 Posts
Top