My Tractor Forum banner
21 - 40 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
The philosophical question is did it make a sound?

What is needed here is an "Excalibur" style picture of a chainsaw with a Hughe Jass bar plunged into a large round.
funny story. Following Tropical Storm Isaias' passing, we had probably 5 or 6 old black oaks come down (babies compared with the OP's tree). we have a pretty big property so 2' to 3' oaks are a dime a dozen. I walked the property after the storm and found two of the oaks leaners on adjacent trees that I noted the location of to keep the kids away until I got them down (eventually). One night about two weeks after the storm, it was pretty windy and while in our back yard at the firepit, heard a tree off in the woods come crashing down. Couldn't see it; only could hear it. Went walking the next day and it was one of the two leaners I found two weeks earlier. Next night, same windy situation, walking the trash out to the curb and off in the woods, another crashing sound. confirmed the next day that it was the other leaner I had found previously. So I can confirm without a doubt that a tree falling in the woods does in fact make a sound whether it was seen or not.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
833 Posts
That big ole' tree would make some real nice boards fo' sho'... sell the lumber and buy some firewood?
Probably too late now but I'm with KR, that log would have brought a lot of money. Using that saw would make you "sprout wood" My FILs saw isn't that big but it is a pretty big saw and I love to run it. Makes you feel like you got a lot of power going on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Friends...
Well!.... I have a lot questions to answer here . Lol.
First, the GMC is a 3 1/2 ton model 1950.
In very good shape with a 302 straight 6 engine.
Truck is a beast and we love it!
As far as the rings on the tree, I have not gotten close enough to the base yet to count rings,
However, there is a math
Atical formula I found online that involves the circumference (19ft.) and area of the country.
What we came up with was 190 years old.

then I contacted the state Forestry Service and asked them to come out and give us their thoughts...
🤔
The gentlemen took some more measurements and he was extremely impressed with its size.
He estimated At least 225+ yrs old.
so this was an established tree During the civil war.
And most likely existed during the Revolutionary War..
Very exciting when u think about all the weather and storms this tree survived.
Bo, it was not on a fence line or hedge row.
It was inside woods about 40 ft.

If any of youknow of a place that would be interest in a slab or some wood before I get too far into cutting up the trunk.
let me know.

I did cut two 42” slabs and brought home,
Put in shop so they could dry a little, have them on floor with 1000 lbs of lead on top to try and keep it flat?

The chainsaw barks while cuttin this baby, you definitely wanna have ear protection and a good grip on it.

someone mentioned watching for cannonballs...
Well funny you say that because I am an avid civil war buff.
Actually my sons and I shoot original civil war guns live fire in competition..... anyhow..

I am friends with a fellow who builds carriages for originalcivil war war cannon barrels.
So what better to build the carriage from then a oak tree that was alive to see that very event!!
I am cutting him some sections to be used.

****... now u guys got me thinkin bought salvaging more pieces and puttin em in our barn..?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,091 Posts
I recommend you search out someone experienced in harvesting and milling old growth timber and see if they can offer considered advice, and perhaps some connections. I believe that tree is quite valuable.

Wood like that doesn't grow on trees... not so much anymore these days.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
355 Posts
As Ronin has said there are a mass of people who would kill for timber like that.
Heritage builders who need "period" wood to repair historic buildings so a start.
Then wood turners, cabinet makers and strait timber millers.
Old growth timber is hard to come by since we realized how much damage we have done cutting down complete forests .
AS the trees get older the growth rings get thinner, ( they put on roughly the same weight each season ).
The finer the grain, the better the wood & the stronger the wood so it is always in high demand compered to plantation timber which is rarely more then 20 years old so the grain is very coarse and makes it hard to work & highly unstable even after things line steam curing and high pressure resin impregnation.
A bit dear to ship down here but stick an add on evilpay "200 year old oak saw log for sale " then stand back
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
35 years ago I was working for a timber guy.
He harvested one of the last old growth timber stands in WV.
Red and white oak trees were close to 8 feet in diameter, 80+ feet to the first branch.
Each tree made about 2 semi loads.
Many of the branches were bigger than new growth trees.
A guy came from Japan, with an interpreter, and bought most of the trees.
They gave us top dollar and paid shipping to get them to Japan from WV.
The junk he did not want went to the CF Martin guitar factory in Long Pond Pa.
Also had a lot of black walnut, the guitar factory wanted all of that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
to add to what the others are saying: prior to buying my property, the prior owner had several large white oaks (3' diameter) taken down and sold to a mill that veneered the trunks for use in cabinetry, engineered wood flooring, fine furniture, etc. Told me he got $20k for them and this was like 20 years ago. Your tree probably has 10x more wood than the 3' diameter trees he sold.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,496 Posts
Fun fact / spoiler....although there were many Revolutionary War battles fought in NJ...there were no Civil War battles there
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Fun fact / spoiler....although there were many Revolutionary War battles fought in NJ...there were no Civil War battles there
I agree while there were no battles in NJ during the civil war... it would still be nice to build a civil war cannon carriage from a tree that was alive during that era.
that was my point.
no, there is no chance of any cannonballs bein stuck in that tree from a civil war battle.
Brian
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,496 Posts
Oh..I agree...anything made out of that wood would be a fine piece....just no concern about some 155 year old ordnance going boom from your chain saw.....if you do get involved with building the carriage, please get us some pictures as it progresses...if that tree could only talk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,694 Posts
I am estimating 2640 Doyle board feet with 50DBH and a 40' stick.

So 2640/500-550= roughly 5 cord.

BTW, that is one of the biggest oaks I have seen. Would have made a satisfying crash to cut down.:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
35 years ago I was working for a timber guy.
He harvested one of the last old growth timber stands in WV.
Red and white oak trees were close to 8 feet in diameter, 80+ feet to the first branch.
Each tree made about 2 semi loads.
Many of the branches were bigger than new growth trees.
A guy came from Japan, with an interpreter, and bought most of the trees.
They gave us top dollar and paid shipping to get them to Japan from WV.
The junk he did not want went to the CF Martin guitar factory in Long Pond Pa.
Also had a lot of black walnut, the guitar factory wanted all of that.
About 30 years ago, I was a high school student. Our agriculture class took a field trip one day to a small woods in southwestern Michigan for an auction. The auction was for a single tree. It was a massive, straight black walnut with a 80 foot limbless trunk. I don't remember the diameter, but I've yet to see another walnut tree like it. Prior to the auction, the tree had been x rayed and determined to be free of any metal. A German company bought it to make veneer. IIR, they paid around $100K for it. A crane was brought in and the tree was taken down in 20' long sections. None of which were allowed to drop to the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Black walnut is rather brittle wood. If it dropped a 2 foot diameter x 20 foot log from 60 plus feet with no branches on it, it most likely would have been worthless for veneer after impact with the ground.
 

·
Have Dog - Will Travel
Joined
·
6,401 Posts
Nice monster Oak. I know there were plenty recommendations to have some of it milled. Good luck. There are several folks around here (in PA) with portable mills, but none of the ones I've seen would be big enough to handle that tree. And, it would take a serious piece of equipment to even lift a log off that tree. I had several red and chestnut oaks come down in storms this summer. Even at 32" DBH it was not easy to load and haul to a mill. We ended up cutting 9' long sections and sliding them up ramp and onto a trailer. In my very limited experience, the mills around here are not buying logs now, rather, they are back-logged (pun acknowledged, not intended) with logs that people (like me) hauled there for sawing for a fee. Used to be able to trade some wood for the sawing, even that isn't happening around here now. There are literally mountains of wood at the local mills. If you could find someone with the right equipment to come get it, take it to a mill and saw it, I'd be very curious what they might pay for it. I say again: Good Luck
 
  • Like
Reactions: mopar65pa

·
Have Dog - Will Travel
Joined
·
6,401 Posts
Some nice looking wood, there...I hope @Jere sees this and gives his opinion on the yield ...I think he would be able to tell better than anyone...but my guess is about 21/2 cords......what year is the GMC?.....my guess on that is 1951
in case you meant me (Jere39) sorry, it didn't notify me due to shortened version of my name. But, found it anyway. And, I would not be prepared to make an estimate of the cord wood in that tree. Even the branches would be more than a couple.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·
in case you meant me (Jere39) sorry, it didn't notify me due to shortened version of my name. But, found it anyway. And, I would not be prepared to make an estimate of the cord wood in that tree. Even the branches would be more than a couple.
I meant to reply as to cord amount guesses.
So far I helped another relative cut up all the canopy branches and everything up to where I am in the picture now(42”)
That was just over 4 cords alone.
11 headings longbEd pickups loads.
And when I say heaping... I mean the frame was on the axle and you couldn’t find a spot to place a coffee cup on top the pile.

I am fairly confident no sawmill is interested in this trunk or sections of it.
Too heavy too big around and too much work for what they might make.

althought , I AM goin to cut a lot of 6” and 8” slabs and paint ends up, store em under cover for possible future buyers?🤷‍♂️

will cut 8 or 9’ trunk section and put in on dunnage at the farm under cover as well until I can decide on a project for it.

another friend has a 50 ton rotator that he offered to pick piece of wood up with and load onto my beam trailer.

we need to wait for a good ground freeze first though.

will def take pics of that operation.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
833 Posts
Just pay a good chainsaw artist to carve it into whatever makes you happy and put it in your front yard! You will smile every time you pull into your drive!
 
21 - 40 of 45 Posts
Top