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Took apart the gearbox on the model 49 for my JD 318. Kept the box mounted as I didn't want to get into a real tear down. Got 7 inches of wet snow on Tuesday and had to use the blade which, I must say, the tractor can really push with a ton of snow in front. But my driveway is gravel, wet (not frozen) and not flat so it keeps digging in without a lot of work. So I want to get the blower on.

Bought the cornhead grease for the gearbox, but still need a gasket to finish the job and it is Thanksgiving, and with more snow on the way this weekend, or ice, or rain, or who knows. I used grease on the chain after tightening the idler sprocket. Good idea or should I use something else?

Overall the blower seems a ok. There is a little, 1/32 or less wobble when I yank on the auger and that is probably the auger on the shaft, not the bearings. There is a bit of a squeal that happens every so often when rotating by hand that comes from the left side. Bearings? Don't know and it seems like more than I can get into before the next snow fall this weekend. Some pics attached. the gears look ok, it was semi filled with black grease and I did my best to clean it out. There is a 1/16 or so play before the big gear moves when I spin the belt pulley, but I have little idea about those things.

Last thing really is to consider the 34T sprocket since this machine hardly moves the snow and we get so much more wet snow these days. Easy job?
 

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Frank, depends on how tight the sprocket is on the shaft. Looks pretty well oiled up, might want to put some penetrator on the shaft for a day or so and see if it will pull off.
 

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Break down & purchase an operators manual. Use the attachment's serial no. to purchase.
Chain lubrication is probably not necessary, especially grease. Feel ya need to - use a good spray
chain lube. But if you use JD corn head at least that stuff is lighter and may be OK when warm.
Photos of the gearbox gears: looks OK. JD Corn head grease is the stuff - get a or make a new gasket.
Many have replaced the stock 40 tooth auger gear with a smaller 36 or even 34 tooth. Will have to adjust
chain length/links, don't forget that.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Break down & purchase an operators manual. Use the attachment's serial no. to purchase.
Chain lubrication is probably not necessary, especially grease. Feel ya need to - use a good spray
chain lube. But if you use JD corn head at least that stuff is lighter and may be OK when warm.
Photos of the gearbox gears: looks OK. JD Corn head grease is the stuff - get a or make a new gasket.
Many have replaced the stock 40 tooth auger gear with a smaller 36 or even 34 tooth. Will have to adjust
chain length/links, don't forget that.
Gonna make a new gasket this weekend after I get some cork. Does it matter 1/16th or 1/8th thick? Ok on the chain lube -have some around here somewhere. And yes, the link shortening, #50 chain -probably can't get to this and I know I ought to be doing this in summer but so busy with the summer stuff. Winter in MN is the slow season!
 

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Frank, depends on how tight the sprocket is on the shaft. Looks pretty well oiled up, might want to put some penetrator on the shaft for a day or so and see if it will pull off.
It may have to wait until summer, unless we have a dry spell this winter. Thanks for the tip
 

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Frank, I'd use the 1/8" gasket mat'l and only because it's seems easier to work with...to me anyhow.

Reading your comments and looking at pics, you're in great shape, except for chain area! First, loosen your idler gear. You want to be able to lift the bottom of your chain 1/2" - 5/8" with finger pressure. Second, remove as much grease from the chain as you can, then apply chain lube. Grease will fly off of your chain and provide no lubrication. Chain lube is made to stick and continue lubricating.

You may have seen this before, but I'll post it again: shear pin. If/when you break a shear pin, 3 things to remember:

1. Use correct grade bolt...Grade 5 for a 49 (3 lines on head of bolt).
2. Use a nylok or self-locking nut and not a lockwasher.
3. Do NOT tighten nut. Tightening nut pulls the drive & driven plates together creating friction between them. This friction must first be overcome and then the shear bolt can shear. This extra force to overcome the friction can be enough to damage the equipment. When properly installed, you should be able to turn the nut, or screw, with your fingers.

I hope everyone had a GREAT holiday, Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Frank, I'd use the 1/8" gasket mat'l and only because it's seems easier to work with...to me anyhow.

Reading your comments and looking at pics, you're in great shape, except for chain area! First, loosen your idler gear. You want to be able to lift the bottom of your chain 1/2" - 5/8" with finger pressure. Second, remove as much grease from the chain as you can, then apply chain lube. Grease will fly off of your chain and provide no lubrication. Chain lube is made to stick and continue lubricating.

You may have seen this before, but I'll post it again: shear pin. If/when you break a shear pin, 3 things to remember:

1. Use correct grade bolt...Grade 5 for a 49 (3 lines on head of bolt).
2. Use a nylok or self-locking nut and not a lockwasher.
3. Do NOT tighten nut. Tightening nut pulls the drive & driven plates together creating friction between them. This friction must first be overcome and then the shear bolt can shear. This extra force to overcome the friction can be enough to damage the equipment. When properly installed, you should be able to turn the nut, or screw, with your fingers.

I hope everyone had a GREAT holiday, Bob
Thanks Bob -I'll clean the grease and buy some chain lube -is this an ordinary auto store product or something special -I have to go get the gasket material today so I can get both at the auto store -great! As for your shear pin points:
Yes -I've read up on those here!
I bought a bag of Grade 5 at Mendards, 1" long 1/4-20
I bought a box of Nylon insert nuts
And I've tightened them enough that they still slightly wobble in place -good?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Frank, I'd use the 1/8" gasket mat'l and only because it's seems easier to work with...to me anyhow.

Reading your comments and looking at pics, you're in great shape, except for chain area! First, loosen your idler gear. You want to be able to lift the bottom of your chain 1/2" - 5/8" with finger pressure. Second, remove as much grease from the chain as you can, then apply chain lube. Grease will fly off of your chain and provide no lubrication. Chain lube is made to stick and continue lubricating.
Just watched this amusing video testing lubes....
 

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Frank, Very interesting and amusing video, but I'm still a strong believer in chain oil...applied HEAVILY to the point it drips off!... and I also believe if it moves, it needs lubrication.

Just to confuse you a little more, John Deere states "Chain does not require any lubrication". Your call, but ANY lube won't hurt. Bob
 

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Frank, Very interesting and amusing video, but I'm still a strong believer in chain oil...applied HEAVILY to the point it drips off!... and I also believe if it moves, it needs lubrication.

Just to confuse you a little more, John Deere states "Chain does not require any lubrication". Your call, but ANY lube won't hurt. Bob
Thinking I may just get some gear oil....
 

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Frank, I thing I did pickup on during the video was the mention of the "seals/o-rings" in the chain. This could be something only pertaining to motorcycle chains...don't know, never really worked that much with bikes. I never looked closely at the chain on my snowblower, but I don't recall any seals/o-rings. No matter what you use, apply heavily. Seal or no seals, it should find its way into the center/pivot points of the chain.

Apply heavily, rotate drive pulley enough to advance chain about 1/2 it's length, and lube again. Bolt on outer guard and go play in the snow! Bob
 

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Frank, Very interesting and amusing video, but I'm still a strong believer in chain oil...applied HEAVILY to the point it drips off!... and I also believe if it moves, it needs lubrication.

Just to confuse you a little more, John Deere states "Chain does not require any lubrication". Your call, but ANY lube won't hurt. Bob
That's really interesting. I have a Berco blower and it states to apply chain lube every 4 hours.
 

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Denver, Different manufacturer's, different spec's. My comment from Deere saying it doesn't require lube was right from the manual...I just tended to "overlook it". Every 4 hours seems a little excessive though. I lubed mine when I took it off in the spring, and then when I put it on in the fall...just to refresh it. 35+ years on the blower and still has original chain and sprockets. I'm not going to argue with success! Bob
 

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Denver, Different manufacturer's, different spec's. My comment from Deere saying it doesn't require lube was right from the manual...I just tended to "overlook it". Every 4 hours seems a little excessive though. I lubed mine when I took it off in the spring, and then when I put it on in the fall...just to refresh it. 35+ years on the blower and still has original chain and sprockets. I'm not going to argue with success! Bob
I get that and I agree that 4 hours seems excessive as does not requiring any lube. I thought it was interesting to see the two extremes especially since its probably the same chain.
 

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Fortnine's video is for motorcycle chains, and the environment that those chains see will be different than your snow blower's chain. You mentioned making the gasket, but I am not clear if this is for the bevel gears or the chain. If the chain is exposed to the snow I'd hit it with chain lube (non one of the other lubes tested by F-9) now and then - at least at the beginning of every winter. I suspect that JD says no lube is needed because the chain sees a relatively low load and is shielded from the elements.
 

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Fortnine's video is for motorcycle chains, and the environment that those chains see will be different than your snow blower's chain. You mentioned making the gasket, but I am not clear if this is for the bevel gears or the chain. If the chain is exposed to the snow I'd hit it with chain lube (non one of the other lubes tested by F-9) now and then - at least at the beginning of every winter. I suspect that JD says no lube is needed because the chain sees a relatively low load and is shielded from the elements.
Yeah, that's what I was thinking, but it was a useful takeaway on the things that do matter -does it cling and does it protect from rust. So, I bought some gear oil for the chain. The gasket is for the gears, the lube is for the chain. The gears got cornhead grease.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Frank, depends on how tight the sprocket is on the shaft. Looks pretty well oiled up, might want to put some penetrator on the shaft for a day or so and see if it will pull off.
Turns out that sprocket came right off. The bearing behind it seems to be wobble free, although when I rotate the auger without the sprocket I hear a tumbled type noise in the shaft. Not sure what that is but can't take everything apart with all this snow. The idler sprocket wobbles side to side and the gearbox-chain shaft sprocket (the one behind the idler) has some play in it, but all turns. Probably needs a new bearing, but again, this tractor is piling up a to do list and now's not a good time so it'll have to survive!
 

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Frank, you were one of the lucky ones then. Most have to use pullers to get it off. Probably the bearings are shot if you are getting any movement on the shaft..
Probably. Have to pace my repairs, LOL. The steering components were relatively sane to do (new spindles would make it just right). I ran the blower for the first time last night and it is a bit quieter after my tweaks. But I really wish it would throw farther so back in my brain is the sprocket mod (PACE MYSELF o_O) The other thing is a quite curved wear bar -I think they run about 55$, but it's pretty beat up and so is the revers.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Looks like I'll need to redo that gearbox-shaft bearing at the first sprocket. Watching it blow the other day and that bearing/shaft was wobbling around in there.
 
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